\"What\'s your poison?\"

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\"What\'s your poison?\"

  1. 1. What's your poison? A campaign to reduce smoking in New Zealand teenagers
  2. 2. Can we interest you in a glass of nail polish remover, a taste of insecticide, a smidgen of gasoline, a spoon of embalming fluid or perhaps a cup of antifreeze and brake fluid? "NO THANK-YOU!" you say? Perhaps a cigarette then?
  3. 3. If you said “yes” to that cigarette, you also said yes to the acetone, the antifreeze and numerous other highly toxic poisons that make up the ingredients of cigarettes!! Of the hundreds of dangerous chemicals and toxins that are used to make cigarettes the most common and some of the most dangerous include:
  4. 4. <ul><li>ACETONE – used in nail polish remover and to make fibres, plastic, </li></ul><ul><li>chemicals and other drugs (Carr, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>AMMONIA – used in fertilisers (Carr, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>ARSENIC – a well known poison, but also used in wood preservers and in </li></ul><ul><li>manufacturing of ammunition. </li></ul><ul><li>BENZENE – used in industrial solvents, as an additive in gasoline and in the </li></ul><ul><li>production of pesticides, detergents, lubricants, dyes, drugs and explosives </li></ul><ul><li>(Health Information resources, 2008). </li></ul><ul><li>PROPYLENE GLYCOL – a known skin and eye irritant found in toner, tyre </li></ul><ul><li>sealant, rubber cleaner, wallpaper stripper, degreasers, stain removers, paint </li></ul><ul><li>and make-up (Natural-health-information-centre.com, 2008). </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>BENZOAPYRENE – on the list of priority pollutants published by the EPA </li></ul><ul><li>(Environmental Protection Agency) (Delaware Health and Social Services, </li></ul><ul><li>2007). It is a skin and eye irritant and probable cancer-causing agent </li></ul><ul><li>(Delaware Health and Social Services,2007). </li></ul><ul><li>BUTANE – used as a feedstock in the production of industrial chemical </li></ul><ul><li>products (BP America, 2008). Prolonged inhalation has an anaesthetic </li></ul><ul><li>effect (BP America, 2008). </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>CADMIUM – used in the production of batteries (Carr, 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>FORMALDEHYDE – used in embalming/tissue preservation, plywood, </li></ul><ul><li>particle board, cosmetics, insulation materials, industrial </li></ul><ul><li>chemicals, explosives and surface coatings (Lowell Centre for </li></ul><ul><li>sustainable production, 2003). </li></ul><ul><li>LEAD – used as a colouring element in ceramic glazes and in lead-acid </li></ul><ul><li>batteries in cars (Carr, 2006). </li></ul>
  7. 8. MEDIA APPROACH FOR ‘’ QUIT SMOKING’’
  8. 9. if you smoke, you have a very good chanCe of being exposed to the types of harm graphically portrayed by these images
  9. 10. ‘ quit’ message 1 out of every 2 smokers will die from a smoking related disease. Those smokers who die from a smoking related illness lose on average 15 years of life compared to non-smokers. Smoking kills around 13 New Zealanders every day.
  10. 11. Smoking causes more than 80 percent of lung cancer cases and is linked to many other cancers. It is also a major cause of heart attacks, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Smoking can also cause blindness, infertility and impotence . Smoking is known to cause harm to nearly every organ and system of your body. It even affects organs that have no direct contact with the smoke itself.
  11. 12. Quitting at any age has short and long term health benefits. The people you live with, especially your children, will also be healthier if you quit smoking. Quitting smoking will reduce your chance of developing heart disease. After one year of not smoking your risk of heart disease is halved. Fifteen years after stopping smoking your risk of heart disease is the same as a non-sm oker.
  12. 13. HEALTH WARNINGS ON SMOKING *Smoking causes blindness,  *Smoking causes gangrene,  *Smoking causes mouth cancer,  *You are not the only one smoking this cigarette,  Over 80% of lung cancers are caused by smoking,  *Tobacco smoke is poisonous,  *Smoking causes heart attacks,  *Smoking can make you impotent,  *Smoking is highly addictive,  *Smoking causes foul and offensive breath *Smoking causes serious lung diseases,  *Smoking more than doubles your risk of stroke,  *Smoking blocks your arteries.
  13. 17. <ul><li>Tar is a black and sticky residue used to cover road surfaces. It clogs up the lungs and causes lung cancer. It contains many cancer-causing substances such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Benzo(a)pyrene found in emissions from burned plant and petroleum products </li></ul><ul><li>Cadmium a poisonous chemical that can cause liver, kidney and brain damage, commonly found in car batteries </li></ul><ul><li>B-napthylamine used in the manufacture of dyes, condensation colours and rubber </li></ul><ul><li>Nitrosamine found in harsh detergents; commonly used as an engine degreaser </li></ul><ul><li>Nicotine is a powerful and addictive drug. It acts as a stimulant, causing your heart rate and blood pressure to soar. </li></ul>
  14. 18. <ul><li>Spontaneous abortion, pre-term births, low-weight full-term babies, and foetal and infant deaths all occur more frequently among mothers who smoke during pregnancy than among those who do not. </li></ul>
  15. 19. <ul><li>Being cruel to own fetus </li></ul>
  16. 22. Smoke free Law in New Zealand <ul><li>On the 3 rd of December 2003 an amendment to the smoke-free environments act 1990 was passed. </li></ul><ul><li>Things that have become smoke-free are places such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Buildings and grounds of schools and early childhood centre's. </li></ul><ul><li>Bars, restaurants, cafes, sports clubs, casinos. </li></ul><ul><li>Other places that have become smoke free in doors include workplaces such as the office, factories, warehouses, work canteens and ‘smoko’ rooms </li></ul><ul><li>The government has also made the display of tobacco products in retail outlets be restricted and a ‘ smoking kills’ sign be put near the tobacco displays for people to see the consequences when buying cigarettes. </li></ul>ALSO: Other products such as herbal smoking products were included in the smoking ban. And the access of these type of products became hard to get and restricted to those that were under the age of 18.
  17. 23. Graphic warnings for cigarette packets <ul><li>Pictorial warnings on cigarette packets are just one of the many tobacco control measures the New Zealand Government has taken to combat the tobacco epidemic. </li></ul><ul><li>The old cigarette packets only had a text warning and this seemed to not get through to the people who smoke and so the Government has replaced the text warnings on cigarette packets to pictorial warnings, covering 30 per cent of the front of every cigarette packet and 90 per cent of the rear. </li></ul><ul><li>The pictorial warnings include images such as diseased lungs, gangrenous toes and rotting gums and teeth. They're designed to shock people into realizing that smoking kills and causes serious illness. </li></ul>
  18. 24. Smoking in public places <ul><li>So with the act being passed this meant that when people went to public places such as bars, restraunts and casino and more importantly schools and day care centers don’t have to put up with second hand smoke that was potentially damaging their health </li></ul><ul><li>So what does the ban mean for people smoking in public places, well it’s a ban on: </li></ul>• smoking in the buildings and grounds of educational institutions (excluding tertiary) 24 hours a day, seven days a week; • the extension of protection from second-hand smoke for workers . • a ban on the display of tobacco products at points-of-sale within retail outlets. <ul><li>Around 350 New Zealanders die each year because of exposure to other people’s tobacco smoke and so this makes second-hand smoke the leading environmental cause of death in this country. </li></ul>
  19. 25. Smoking and Maori health <ul><li>One of the most significant issues for Maori is smoking. </li></ul>Statistics show: • 31 percent of Maori deaths are due to cigarette smoking. • Around 50 percent of Maori adults (15 years and over) currently smoke. • 49.4 percent of young Maori (aged 15-24 years) smoke. • 54.4 percent of young Maori females smoke. <ul><li>It has been estimated that the government collects over $150 million per year from Maori smokers in tobacco tax! </li></ul><ul><li>So the demand has been growing for more funding for stop smoking programmes for Maori. </li></ul>
  20. 26. The Treaty of Waitangi and Smoking <ul><li>Partnership: </li></ul><ul><li>Working together with Maori communities to develop strategies for Maori health gain and appropriate health and disability services. </li></ul><ul><li>So campaigns like TV advertisements such as Every cigarette is doing you damage and its About Whanau is working closely with the Maori community to deliver on the overall aim of healthy Maori families achieving their maximum health and wellbeing in that of not smoking. </li></ul><ul><li>Media campaigns </li></ul><ul><li>The quit smoking campaigns Every Cigarette is Doing You Damage and It’s About Whanau targets the 25–44 years age group. The aims of the television campaigns are to promote stop smoking and to encourage those wanting to quit smoking to call the Quit line for ongoing support and advice. The It’s About Whänau television campaign, in particular, encourages Maori smokers to quit smoking </li></ul><ul><li>It’s about Whanau </li></ul><ul><li>The It’s about whanau campaign features a number of Maori ex-smokers who represent diverse iwi, age groups and socio-economic backgrounds. They share their personal stories about quitting smoking, which highlight the effects of smoking on family. This is showing partnership as this is supplying support and services targeting the Maori and so is showing the Maori the health gains and what it can do for them as Maori to stop smoking. </li></ul>
  21. 27. The Treaty of Waitangi and Smoking <ul><li>Participation: </li></ul><ul><li>The participation principle of the treaty involves Maori at all levels of the health spectrum in making choices, planning, improving and delivering health and disability </li></ul><ul><li>services. So services such as quit line and quit group are put in place to help the Maori to quit smoking. </li></ul><ul><li>The Quit Group is a charitable trust set up to run quit smoking programmes in New Zealand, including the national free telephone support Quit line. Our aim is to reduce the number of New Zealanders who smoke, with a particular focus on Maori smokers. They develop and provide innovative quit smoking programmes, television, radio, and print quit campaigns as well as evidence-based tobacco control facts and figures. </li></ul><ul><li>Quit Group: </li></ul><ul><li>The Quit Group desires to be acknowledged as an organization that is responsive and supportive of Maori expectations and aspirations, and will ensure this commitment is entrenched in its own strategic planning and operations. </li></ul><ul><li>The programmes are funded by the Ministry of Health. </li></ul>
  22. 28. The Treaty of Waitangi and Smoking <ul><li>Protection: </li></ul><ul><li>The protection principle is the process of working to ensure Maori have the same level of health as non-Maori. </li></ul><ul><li>So the aim is to protect Maori cultural concepts, values and traditions . </li></ul><ul><li>So protection of Maori can be achieved if the health professionals recognize the distinctive way that Maori respond to certain issues and so in particular with smoking, health problems associated to smoking, are heart disease, lung cancer and respiratory diseases and so health professionals should deliver at all levels of healthcare and should ensure that Maori receive the appropriate care in relation to their needs. </li></ul>
  23. 31. <ul><li>You are agreeing to; a number of  cancers , increasing your heart rate and blood pressure, straining your heart and blood vessels, the heart attacks and strokes.... </li></ul>YOU ARE AGREEING TO THE DEADLY STATISTICS
  24. 32. Want a change? <ul><li>Change is possible, and New Zealand is helping to lead the world in the anti-smoking movement by actively promoting strategies of awareness that offer the public with the only information that can save them-the truth. </li></ul><ul><li>This comes with the intention of saving thousands of Kiwi’s falling victim to this poison... </li></ul>
  25. 33. Campaigns and Strategies- NZ <ul><li>In 2004, The smoking ban on indoor areas enforced by the NZ government has seen smoking around areas of pubs and bars halve in numbers. </li></ul><ul><li>Video Advertisements Like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syuxMvLosBw , preached by NZ celebrities show the smoking public that smoking is no longer the fashion symbol that it once was, aiming to ‘anti-socialise’ smoking. </li></ul>
  26. 34. <ul><li>Advertisement showing hard hitting damage to people, such as this newly released Adrian Pilkington featured ad. http://www.quit.org.nz/page/media/campaigns/healthWarningsAdrian.php , a man who has 6 months to live after diagnosed with mouth cancer, use reality scare tactics to personalise images such as the ones on the bottom of the slides prompting smokers to quit. </li></ul>
  27. 35. Campaigns and strategies-aboard <ul><li>In Canada, MTV (teenage targeted tv channel) and Ministry of Health have come together and put up a 50 foot banner outside their MTV headquarters condemning teenage smoking, also using celebrity band performance to send the message home to teenagers. </li></ul><ul><li>Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Health is using the Islamic holy month of Ramadan to convince people to quit smoking through distribution of 0.5 million pamphlets and opening of 35 country wide anti-smoking clinics. A message said to target those who are religious to give up their addiction through spiritual well-being. </li></ul>
  28. 36. What is the message? <ul><li>Everybody around the world is moving forward to quit smoking…. </li></ul><ul><li>DON’T let yourself be LEFT BEHIND. </li></ul>
  29. 37. <ul><li>&quot;Health is not everything, but without health, everything else is nothing.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li> ~ Anonymous </li></ul>
  30. 38. SOME PEOPLE WHO SMOKE A PACK A DAY! SPEND OVER $3000 A YEAR! YOU CAN BUY TWO CARS FOR THAT
  31. 39. AROUND HALF OF ALL SMOKERS AGED 20 WILL DIE EARLY AS A RESULT OF SMOKING .
  32. 40. Increasing numbers of young people think that smoking is not as cool as it is made out to be. If you are offered a cigarette by anyone, just say no.
  33. 41. (ASH, 2004)
  34. 43. SAVE MONEY TO BUY NEW THINGS ON AVERAGE IF YOU SMOKE A PACK A DAY THATS AN EXTRA $70 A WEEK YOU COULD SPEND ON OTHER THINGS! FEEL BETTER QUITTING IMPROVES YOUR HEALTH AND YOU WILL LIVE LONGER! CONFIDENCE BOOST ITS SOMETHING TO BE PROUD OF
  35. 45. CHECK OUT SOME OF THESE LINKS FOR MORE INFO ON QUITTING SMOKING OR ABOUT HOW SMOKING IS SO HARMFUL. http://www.notourfuture.co.nz/ http://www.auahikore.org.nz/ http://www.lungfish.co.nz/home http://www.attitude.org.nz/ http://www.notourfuture.co.nz/
  36. 47. You may think you look like this: Gorgeous MASCULINE
  37. 48. But if you smoke you will most likely be perceived by others as this:
  38. 50. DON’T BE A MONKEY!

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