Tips For Highly Effective Energy Management

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  • Uses – as a blower, to clean your clothes (dangerous), cooling, etc…
  • One company assumed that these compressors were being turned off when in fact there was a perceived production requirement that they be left on – reality was quite different.
  • Tips For Highly Effective Energy Management

    1. 1. 7 Habits of Highly Effective Energy Managers Rick Marsh Director, Industrial EE Network
    2. 2. 2 Engineers Design for “Just in Case” not Energy Efficiency • Fans & Pumps are usually oversized to consider worse case scenarios. • Furnaces designed for peak product flow but.
    3. 3. 3 Air is FREE! (Compressed Air is Very Expensive) • Compared to electric motors, the work that is conducted by compressed air is 7 times more expensive. • Poor management of air supply can yield inefficiencies for costs and also in meeting demand events. • Inappropriate uses and leaks are BIG opportunities
    4. 4. 4 Motel 6 Got it Wrong – Don’t Leave the Lights On • Changing bulbs is a good first step • All light is not created equal • Sensors and controls – Occupancy sensors – Daylighting – Timers
    5. 5. 5 Reality is Somewhere Between our Expectations & Total Chaos • Few industrial operations are truly 24/7 • Compressor sequencing & controls can adversely affect energy efficiency
    6. 6. 6 Low Hanging Fruit Always Seems to Grow Back • Air & steam leaks • HVAC efficiency losses • results of poor maintenance • equipment degradation = need for a continual management process.
    7. 7. 7 Production Needs vs. EE (Can’t We Just All Get Along!) • Perceived needs • Refusing to change anything that may cause a production issue often conflicts with energy reduction • Energy Management = Opportunity
    8. 8. 8 Metering You Can’t Reduce What You Don’t Measure, and You Can’t Measure What You Don’t Meter • Sub-metering helps to align energy consumption with significant energy uses allowing for concentration of effort. • Measuring energy performance should be calculated as a basis of production (energy intensity) without consideration for rate changes – MMBtu/unit production
    9. 9. 9 Material Developed By: Dr. Ken Currie Director, Center for Manufacturing Research Associate Director, Industrial Assessment Center Tennessee Tech University kcurrie@tntech.edu

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