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Aboriginal bio-cultural knowledgein Australian ecosystem management and policy:Progress, challenges and opportunities thro...
Aboriginal bio-cultural knowledge                                               www.australiangeographic.com.auAboriginal ...
Ecological knowledge: embedded in culture www.allenandunwin.com   www.janesoceania.com
Ecological knowledge: embedded in culture                         Ray Nadjamerrek recording rock art locations www.lonelyp...
Threats to Aboriginal cultural survivalwww.fraserjourney.ca                           www.nacchocommunique.comwww.cadigalw...
Technology forcultural maintenance
Indigenous natural and cultural    resource management
Indigenous estate 2010 > 23% Australia! From: Altman, Biddle and Buchanan (2010) The Indigenous hybrid economy: Can the NA...
Support for Indigenous natural and        cultural resource managementSeptember 2012
Increasingrecognition and  opportunity
Challenges to sustained support and     development of collaborations• Depletion of some Aboriginal knowledge• Lack of bro...
Progress – through TERN and ACEAS         1. Chapter in upcoming LTERN/MSPN book –        The cultural imperative: broaden...
Progress – through TERN and ACEAS                            Why?To promote two-way learning, research and action between ...
Data collation so far…
Emmanuel Namarnyilk and Gerry Turpin   Living knowledgecase studies
Meetings TERN’ objectives• To connect ecosystem scientists and enable them  to collect, contribute, store, share and integ...
Benefits of ACEAS for INCRM and IBCK• Flexible• Organised• Supportive of multi-disciplinary and  cross-cultural work
We need to do more!Summary:• Unique culture linked to deep  ecological knowledge• Fastest growing conservation  sector• 23...
Thanks!• ACEAS IBCK WG 1 members   – Beth Gott, Gerry Turpin, Emmanuel     Namarnyilk, Bruce Doran, Petina Pert, Jo     Pa...
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Emilie Ens_Progress, challenges and opportunities in the incorporation of Indigenous biocultural knowledge into Australian ecosystem management and policy

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Emilie Ens_Progress, challenges and opportunities in the incorporation of Indigenous biocultural knowledge into Australian ecosystem management and policy

  1. 1. Aboriginal bio-cultural knowledgein Australian ecosystem management and policy:Progress, challenges and opportunities through TERN Dr Emilie Ens ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research The Australian National University and the ACEAS Indigenous Bio-cultural Knowledge Working Group 1 Beth Gott, Gerry Turpin, Emmanuel Namarnyilk, Bruce Doran, Petina Pert, Joanne Packer, Jitendra Gaikwad and Tina Bain
  2. 2. Aboriginal bio-cultural knowledge www.australiangeographic.com.auAboriginal language groupsMap source: David Horton © ASP, AIATSIS 1996
  3. 3. Ecological knowledge: embedded in culture www.allenandunwin.com www.janesoceania.com
  4. 4. Ecological knowledge: embedded in culture Ray Nadjamerrek recording rock art locations www.lonelyplanet.com in Warddeken IPA. Photo: Kim McKenzie www.lonelyplanet.com
  5. 5. Threats to Aboriginal cultural survivalwww.fraserjourney.ca www.nacchocommunique.comwww.cadigalwangal.org.au www.abc.net.au
  6. 6. Technology forcultural maintenance
  7. 7. Indigenous natural and cultural resource management
  8. 8. Indigenous estate 2010 > 23% Australia! From: Altman, Biddle and Buchanan (2010) The Indigenous hybrid economy: Can the NATSISS adequately recognise difference?
  9. 9. Support for Indigenous natural and cultural resource managementSeptember 2012
  10. 10. Increasingrecognition and opportunity
  11. 11. Challenges to sustained support and development of collaborations• Depletion of some Aboriginal knowledge• Lack of broad awareness of Aboriginal knowledge• IP and access issues• Conflicting priorities of some Indigenous and non- Indigenous people• Paucity of resources for effective cross-cultural engagement• Institutional barriers
  12. 12. Progress – through TERN and ACEAS 1. Chapter in upcoming LTERN/MSPN book – The cultural imperative: broadening the vision of long-term ecological monitoring to enhance environmental policy and management outcomes Emilie Ens, Emma Burns, Jeremy Russell-Smith, Ben Sparrow and Glenda Wardle 2. ACEAS Indigenous Bio-cultural Knowledge Working Group Aims: To collate, analyse and raise awareness of collaborativebio-cultural knowledge projects across Australia and promote best practice methods
  13. 13. Progress – through TERN and ACEAS Why?To promote two-way learning, research and action between Indigenous and non-Indigenous ecologists, land managers and policy makers How?1. Spatial & temporal analysis of publically available material 2. Discussion paper 3. Interactive website
  14. 14. Data collation so far…
  15. 15. Emmanuel Namarnyilk and Gerry Turpin Living knowledgecase studies
  16. 16. Meetings TERN’ objectives• To connect ecosystem scientists and enable them to collect, contribute, store, share and integrate data across disciplines• To increase the capacity of the Australian ecosystem science community to advance science and contribute to effective management and sustainable use of our ecosystems
  17. 17. Benefits of ACEAS for INCRM and IBCK• Flexible• Organised• Supportive of multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural work
  18. 18. We need to do more!Summary:• Unique culture linked to deep ecological knowledge• Fastest growing conservation sector• 23 % of Aus Indigenous owned• 2 % of the population• 3 % of conservation $• ? % TERN• National approach to building socio-ecological resilience
  19. 19. Thanks!• ACEAS IBCK WG 1 members – Beth Gott, Gerry Turpin, Emmanuel Namarnyilk, Bruce Doran, Petina Pert, Jo Packer, Jitendra Gaikwad and Tina Bain• The ACEAS team especially Alison Specht• Co-authors of “The Cultural imperative” chapter in upcoming MSPN book – Emma Burns, Glenda Wardle, Jeremy Russell- Smith and Ben Sparrow• All my Aboriginal colleagues, especially in Arnhem Land

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