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Managing a production forest landscape tosustain mature forest biodiversity?Is the Regional Forest Agreement working?Prese...
What we wantMature forest species to persist inmature eucalypt forestsMature forest species torecolonise areas after distu...
We have a lot of mature eucalyptforests BUT it’s not evenly distributed          As here?                         What abo...
A mosaic of disturbance-drivenvegetation types                         Rainforest              LONG                       ...
Landscape context: what’s in the neighbourhood?                           Two patches of silvicultural                    ...
The gradient of disturbance intensity                                   100Proportion of landscape (% area)               ...
Sampling the gradient                                                         Mature eucalypt                             ...
Measuring the biodiversity                                   100Proportion of landscape (% area)                          ...
The biodiversity   44 species          619 species                                       107 species3133 observations   85...
Response of disturbance-sensitiveelements to landscape disturbance                Context-class of 1 km radius landscape  ...
Response of disturbance-sensitiveelements to landscape disturbance                  Context-class of 1 km radius landscape...
Biodiversity response to context-class                          = response to mature eucalypt forest                      ...
Biodiversity response to context-class= response to mature eucalypt forest                                        10      ...
To maintain mature forest biodiversityin production forest landscapes  1. Retain patches of mature forest in reserves or  ...
RFA: a mix of retention strategies    Formal reserves                      Informal reserves                              ...
Disturbance context-class: priorities forretention to sustain mature forest biodiversity  Minimally disturbed (context cla...
Focus is on public land                          State forest
Formal reserves:
+ Informal reserves
+ long-term retention (off-reserve)
Current and future mature eucalypt   forest in long-term retention                                                     80 ...
Proximity of available harvest areas to long-               term retention                                95% of areas ava...
Is the RFA working?Mostly…..  • It’s increased long-term retention of eucalypt forest in    parts of the landscape where m...
Postscript• The Tasmanian Parliament is currently  considering the Tasmanian Forests  Agreement• Aims to end forestry conf...
With:The team                   • Ruiping Gao                           • Marie Yee                           • Dave McElw...
Tim Wardlaw_A gradient study at the Warra Supersite provides new knowledge to support the management of production forests...
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Tim Wardlaw_A gradient study at the Warra Supersite provides new knowledge to support the management of production forests to sustain biodiversity

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Tim Wardlaw_A gradient study at the Warra Supersite provides new knowledge to support the management of production forests to sustain biodiversity

  1. 1. Managing a production forest landscape tosustain mature forest biodiversity?Is the Regional Forest Agreement working?Presentation by: Tim Wardlaw, Forestry Tasmania
  2. 2. What we wantMature forest species to persist inmature eucalypt forestsMature forest species torecolonise areas after disturbance ……….throughout forest landscapes
  3. 3. We have a lot of mature eucalyptforests BUT it’s not evenly distributed As here? What about the recolonisation of areas by mature forest species after disturbance? Do mature eucalypt forests here have a similar biodiversity
  4. 4. A mosaic of disturbance-drivenvegetation types Rainforest LONG Interval between disturbance events Wildfire eucalypt (mature) Wildfire eucalypt (regrowth) Other native forest Older silvicultural regeneration Younger silvicultural regeneration PlantationIncreasing disturbance Native non-forest Agricultural land SHORT Huon River
  5. 5. Landscape context: what’s in the neighbourhood? Two patches of silvicultural regeneration Frequent disturbance: Infrequent disturbance: (mostly anthropogenic) (mostly natural) • Non-forest • Rainforest • Plantation • Mature eucalypt forest • Silvicultural regeneration • Wildfire regrowth
  6. 6. The gradient of disturbance intensity 100Proportion of landscape (% area) 90 Natural • Rainforest 80 • Mature eucalypt 70 • Wildfire regrowth 60 • Other native forest 50 40 30 20 • Silvicultural regen . Anthropogenic 10 • Plantation • Agricultural 0 3 4 5 6 7 Most disturbed Context-class Least disturbed
  7. 7. Sampling the gradient Mature eucalypt 100 Older silviculturalProportion of landscape (% area) 90 Natural regeneration 80 70 7 7 7 7 60 50 7 7 7 7 2 forest types 40 X 30 4 context-classes 20 Anthropogenic 10 X 0 7 replicates 3 4 5 6 7 Context-class Most disturbed Least disturbed
  8. 8. Measuring the biodiversity 100Proportion of landscape (% area) 90 Natural 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 Anthropogenic 10 0 3 4 5 6 7 Context-class
  9. 9. The biodiversity 44 species 619 species 107 species3133 observations 85,740 specimens Responsive to landscape disturbance intensity 5 species 38 species 13 species
  10. 10. Response of disturbance-sensitiveelements to landscape disturbance Context-class of 1 km radius landscape 3 4 5 6 7 Increasing disturbance in surrounding landscape
  11. 11. Response of disturbance-sensitiveelements to landscape disturbance Context-class of 1 km radius landscape 3 4 5 6 7 Reduced abundance / richness Abundance / richness maintained Mature Silvicultural Mature Silvicultural Mature Silvicultural
  12. 12. Biodiversity response to context-class = response to mature eucalypt forest Plot offorest birds Dense Fitted Model Disturbance-sensitive beetles Plot of Fitted Model Rainforest plants Plot of Fitted Model 50 30 10 Number of beetle speciesNumber of birds counted Number of plant species 40 25 8 20 30 6 15 20 4 10 10 5 2 0 0 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Amount of mature eucalypt forest in 1 km landscape (% area) • Poorer recolonisation in landscapes with little mature eucalypt forest • Maintain at least 20% mature eucalypt forest
  13. 13. Biodiversity response to context-class= response to mature eucalypt forest 10 8 Number of rainforest species 6 4 2 0 -2 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Distance to nearest mature forest (m) • More disturbance-sensitive species recolonise older silvicultural regeneration when mature forest is nearby
  14. 14. To maintain mature forest biodiversityin production forest landscapes 1. Retain patches of mature forest in reserves or long-term retention (Aim for at least 20% in 1 km radius landscape) 2. Configure retention so that a high proportion of harvest areas are close to retained mature forest (Aim for harvest areas to be within 400 m of mature forest) How does the RFA perform?
  15. 15. RFA: a mix of retention strategies Formal reserves Informal reserves Off-reserve management
  16. 16. Disturbance context-class: priorities forretention to sustain mature forest biodiversity Minimally disturbed (context classes 7-10) Intensively disturbed (context classes 1-4) Decline in mature forest Intermediate disturbance biodiversity. Retention to (context classes 5-6) provide more future mature forest a high priority Wood production areas provide comparable mature forest biodiversity as minimally disturbed areas
  17. 17. Focus is on public land State forest
  18. 18. Formal reserves:
  19. 19. + Informal reserves
  20. 20. + long-term retention (off-reserve)
  21. 21. Current and future mature eucalypt forest in long-term retention 80 Amount in surrounding 1km landscape (% of area) Mature in CAR Mature - excluded 70 Regrowth in CAR Regrowth - excluded 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Context-class 52% of total landscape 40% of total landscape
  22. 22. Proximity of available harvest areas to long- term retention 95% of areas available for harvest within 500m of long-term retention
  23. 23. Is the RFA working?Mostly….. • It’s increased long-term retention of eucalypt forest in parts of the landscape where mature eucalypt forest is deficient • It’s retained sufficient mature forest in long-term retention to sustain biodiversity in the less intensively disturbed parts of the production landscapeBut, • Not all retained eucalypt forest is mature • Proximity benefits for recolonisation need to be demonstrated in most disturbed landscapes
  24. 24. Postscript• The Tasmanian Parliament is currently considering the Tasmanian Forests Agreement• Aims to end forestry conflict in Tasmania• Proposes a more “black and white” forest landscape.• Conservation Science did not get considered during negotiations to this agreement
  25. 25. With:The team • Ruiping Gao • Marie Yee • Dave McElwee • Jordan RendellSimon Grove (FT) • Leigh Edwards • Dick BashfordJayne Balmer (UTas) • Liam HindrumAndrew Hingston (FT) • Nita RamsdenLynne Forster (UTas) • Kevin Bonham • Nicky LynchChristina Schmuki (UTas) • Lucile BaudRob Musk (FT) • Grégoire Thauvin • Elsa LibisSteve Read (FT) • Chloe Hill • Yijin Ong

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