Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Disrupting Social Activism

1,915 views

Published on

http://tbwanyplanning.tumblr.com/

Social Activism 2.0: The Social Media Generation and Social Responsibility

Published in: Business, Health & Medicine
  • High paying Twitter jobs? $25 per hour, start immediately ★★★ http://t.cn/AieXipTS
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

Disrupting Social Activism

  1. 1. SOCIAL ACTIVISM 2.0The Social Media Generation and Social Responsibility
  2. 2. 1CHANGING ARCHITECTURE
  3. 3. 2PARTNERSHIPS
  4. 4. 3 BRAND YOU (e.g. )CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT YOU & YOUR PARTNERS
  5. 5. 4WHY RESEARCH SOCIAL ACTIVISM?
  6. 6. THE RESEARCH 5THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATIONCAUSES THAT MOVE THEMWHY BRANDS SHOULD CARESOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION ENGAGEMENT IN CAUSESNEW KIND OF ACTIVISTS FOR A NEW GENERATION10 WAYS BRANDS CAN GET IN THE GAME
  7. 7. THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION
  8. 8. THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION (SMG) 7 Under 30s who engage with social media as an integral part of their lives SOCIAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY picture wall instant music blogs vlogs email crowdsourcing sharing postings messaging sharing SOCIAL PLUGGED IN 72% of18-29 year olds use social 40% of 18-24 year olds spend MOBILE network sites 10-30 hours a month on social networks, posting and sharing 18-24 year olds spend 3x (Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, 2009) as much time texting as adults do. content with their friends (Nielsen NetView, December 2009) And they spend 2x as much time 66% of college students go on texting as young workers, aged social networks daily (Youth Trends, August 2009) 25-34 (Nielsen Wire, 2008) (Social Media Technology defined by Kaplan and Haenlein in “Business Horizons”)
  9. 9. EDUCATED AND OPTIMISTIC 8EDUCATEDMORE IN COLLEGE OPTIMISTIC10% of college-age adults graduated from college in the 1960s The difference between the40% of college-age adults are enrolled in college in 2010 millenial generation and the youth of the 1960s was that in the 60’s no one wanted to be a part of the system, while today’s young graduates, in contrast, are trying to change the system from within.
  10. 10. THEY ARE NOT LAZY SLACKERS 9 Only 1 in 5 is inactive While activism used to mean participating in rallies and protests, for today’s 20-somethings, supporting (or denouncing) a cause is as simple as hitting the “like” button on Facebook or posting a hashtag on Twitter. Sometimes, that’s where their involvement ends. But often, it is only the beginning.
  11. 11. 3 NEW THEMES OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 10SOCIAL IS PERSONALPassion for social causes is very personal, often ACTIVISM IS BEING REDEFINEDdictated by gender, lifestage, and circumstance.Understand their personal point of view in orderto leverage it for your brand. BY SLACKTIVISTS AND 2.0 ACTIVISTS The SMG has been accused of “not doing anything” but becoming Facebook fans of causes - but a full 40% of the SMG donate time, money, and social energy to affect change in addition to engaging online. SHARING = SOLVING Activism is no longer just about rallies and protests, but increasingly about gaining knowledge and sharing it.
  12. 12. CAUSES THAT MOVE THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION
  13. 13. A WIDE RANGE OF CONCERNS 12Over 90% care about social causes related to education, health, poverty and human rights HEALTH HUMAN RIGHTS cancer...access to health care...diseases other than HIV... domestic violence...women’s equal rights...care of the elderly POVERTY women’s health...childhood diseases...HIV/AIDS...drug and ...human trafficking...race relations...non-violence and conflict resolution hunger alcohol TIMELY TOPICS EDUCATION LONG TAIL CAUSES freedom of speech...online privacy information...obesity homelessness/housing...support for the arts...LGBT rights quality education...access to education...literacy ...fair treatment of immigrants...working conditions...refugee assistance and aid
  14. 14. COLLEGE STUDENTS CARE ABOUT THE UNDERDOG 13More college students care about human rights causes such as: v. (graduates in the workplace) 58% 55% Human Trafficking 53% 46% Race Relations More college students care about poverty causes such as: v. 64% Hunger of college graduates in the workplace believe the best 62% 55% way for companies to support a social cause is to donate proceeds from purchases (versus only 48% ofHomelessness college students) 51% 40%
  15. 15. WORKERS CARE ABOUT PERSONALLY RELEVANT ISSUES 14 Workers ca re less abo inequalities ut solving a and more a ll the world bout issues ’s social impact on that have a their lives direct on. and that the y can have an impact v. 75% 70% Access to health care 68% 63% Online privacy information 60% 57% Women’s equal rights More college graduates in the workplace believe that corporations have material resources that could help social causes (a 10 percentage point jump over college students)
  16. 16. WHY BRANDS SHOULD CARE
  17. 17. DOING GOOD IS GOOD FOR BRANDS 161 THEY KNOW YOU CAN DO IT 2 GIVE THEM SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT3 in 4 resree that companies have the material ag ources to support social causes More than 75% would tell their friends about a use. company that supports a social ca 3 BE REAL TO WIN THEM AND 4 THEY WILL SHOW YOU KEEP THEM THE MONEY 5 THEY WILL WORK FOR YOU More than 75% prefer to buy 3 in s4 woloyalty ifportcompanyies wi uld sup compan th were from a socially responsible 56% ase and purch a truly involved and made a differ ence in a company would be more likely cause to seek employment with a socially responsible company Top 100 Socially Responsible Companies
  18. 18. WHY AND HOW THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION ENGAGES IN SOCIAL CAUSES
  19. 19. CAUSES ARE PERSONAL 18 out 2 in 3 say they care ab it is socia l causes because ey are im portant to who th
  20. 20. GENDER AND LIFESTAGE DRIVE ENGAGEMENT 19During this stage of their lives, the SMG are defining themselves as women, men, students, and members of the workforce. Engaging in personally relevant social causes is an important way they can express who they are and what they stand for.COLLEGE STUDENTS vs. GRADUATES IN WOMEN vs. MEN THE WORKPL ACE 83% of women try to stay informed about their top conc erns vs. (11% more than men) lace believe thatMore colle ge graduates in the workp resources that could helpco rporations have material e point jump over collegesoci al causes (a 10 percentag students)
  21. 21. COLLEGE STUDENTS AND WOMEN LEAD THE REST 20Both groups care more, stay more informed,and talk to their friends more about causes thaneach of their counterparts1 WOMEN 2 COLLEGE STUDENTSMore women would tell their friends about a company that supports a social cause (74% vs. 65% of men) 76% of college students stay informed about social causes
  22. 22. WOMEN HAVE THEIR OWN ISSUES 21Women of the SMG are more likely than their male counterparts to share information, stayinformed and care more about causes than men. CAUSES THAT MORE WOMEN CARE ABOUT THAN MEN Domestic violence 80% 55% Women’s health 80% 41% Women’s equal rights 73% 42% Drug and alcohol abuse 61% 39% Care of the elderly 61% 38%
  23. 23. WOMEN DO MORE 22 v. More women talk to their74% 65% friends about their top causes More women would tell their79% 66% friends about a company that supports a social cause More women try to stay83% 72% informed about their top concerns
  24. 24. WHAT ABOUT MEN? 23 Fewer men care about social issues across the board, but those who do... - Are more likely to be (tax breaks) financially motivated - Find more satisfaction from onlin - Would pre fer to enga e activities ge with a c through so ompany sp cial netwo onsor - Are more rk willing to d - Motivated onate thei to engage r time the way the in social iss y are perce ues if it cha ived by oth nges - Peer pre ers ssure is mor for them e likely to tr igger action
  25. 25. COLLEGE STUDENTS SOLVE PROBLEMS THROUGH KNOWLEDGE SHARING 24 76% of college students stay informed about social causes 71% of them talk to their friends about social causes
  26. 26. COLLEGE STUDENTS ALSO CARE ABOUT THEMSELVES 25More college students would engage in acause if: - It were a very well-known event or activity - It contributed to their resumes - They were recognized for their involvement What’s in it for me? “Skills employers are increasingly demanding the ability to work in a team, solve complex problems, and communicate clearly in print and in person.”
  27. 27. HOW THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION ENGAGES 261 STAYING INFORMED80% 2 TELLING THEIR FRIENDSof college-educated ABOUT SOCIAL CAUSESadults get theirinformation and Knowledge sharing seenews online toward mor ms to be firs e familiar fo t step such as don rms of actio ating time o n, r money
  28. 28. THE POWER OF ONLINE NEWS 27 56% of college students top 10 sites where they go for information and news read news and browse for information online TRIBUNE NEWSPAPERS
  29. 29. PROBLEM SOLVING IS SOCIAL 28The SMG share information about causes andsocial issues they feel passionate about as a firststep to their involvement 70% tell their friends about social cau ses Mo re than 75% tr y to st ay informed about s ocial causes
  30. 30. ONLINE ACTIVISTS WALK THE TALK 29Among those who participatedin online activities in support oftheir top social causes: 69% also donated time 62% also donated money (vs. 48% of the SMG) (vs. 43% of the SMG)
  31. 31. SYMBIOSIS OF ONLINE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVISM 30 Tunisia Egypt Iran “We were the first to use Facebook, the first toUndoubtedly, besides youth frustration and anger, the most important use Twitter in order to get out messages andadditional ingredient in the success of the Jasmine revolution was the bring in new people.” use of new information technologies to quickly spread news “Things are moving very fast in Egypt, and this is and images and to help organize street protests. (Source: Brookings Institute, 2011) the only way of keeping up with the people.” (Source: The Globe and Mail) Tunisia Iran Egypt
  32. 32. NEW KIND OF ACTIVISTS FOR A NEW GENERATION
  33. 33. SLACTIVISTS AND 2.0 ACTIVISTS AT A GLANCE 32Our study uncovered two groups that give us a fresh perspective on activism for the SMG. Slacktivist)s 37% 2.0 Activists 40% rs (Knowledge Share (Knowledge Sh arers who Act) 52% 55% 51% 51% 45% 48% 49% 49%
  34. 34. FOR SLACTIVISTS, INFORMATION SHARING IS ACTIVISM 33 In this generation, Slacktivists are the most generalized about. Although they may not protest, rally, or organize sit-ins, their penchant for knowledge sharing makes them a ready-made broadcast force for awareness building of social causes.77% consider staying informed as the most satisfying way of engaging 44% find talking to their friends about causes the most satisfying 84% find it important to stay informed about freedom of speech
  35. 35. SLACTIVISTS BELIEVE IN COMPANIES 34 CONVERSE STARBUCKS NIKE APPLE PENGUIN CLASSICS 60% consider donating part of their proceeds the best way companies can support a social cause 3 in 4 Slacktivists would be more likely to buy from a company that helps them support a social cause, but are less likely to have multiple motivations to act than 2.0 Activists
  36. 36. 2.0 ACTIVISTS GO WAY BEYOND INFORMATION SHARING 35 76% Donate time 63% Participate in online activities 61% Donate money 55% Attend a meeting or a rally in person 55% Participate in a fundraising activity
  37. 37. 2.0 ACTIVISTS OVERLAP WITH YOUR YOUNG WORKERS 36
  38. 38. AND MANY VOLUNTEER IN THE AREAS IN WHICH THEY WORK 37
  39. 39. 2.0 ACTIVISTS HAVE THEIR REASONS FOR BEING ACTIVISTS 38 62% feel as if they are doing something to help 41% receive information and feel prompted to act 28% think it’s a fun social thing to do
  40. 40. 2.0 ACTIVISTS FEEL EMPOWERED 39 56% of 2.0 Activists would be more likely to engage in social causes if they could do it with their friends46%believe they have amaximum to some impacton social causes thatmatter to them
  41. 41. 2.0 ACTIVISTS HAVE GLOBAL CONCERNS BUT FEEL RESPONSIBLE LOCALLY 40Area of CONCERN for top social issue 53% 52% 43% GLOBAL NATIONAL LOCALArea of personal RESPONSIBILITY 38% 52% 89% GLOBAL NATIONAL LOCAL
  42. 42. THE POWER OF LOCAL ACTIVISM 41 ‘Check-in for charity’ got 2010 SXSW participants in Austin to check-in usingtheir Foursquare app to raise money for $15,000 was reached in less thanthe Save the Children Haiti Relief Fund. For every check-in, Pay Pal and 48 hours (Selfish Giving, March 2010) Microsoft donated $0.25, up to a maximum amount of $15,000.
  43. 43. 10 WAYS BRANDS CAN GET IN THE GAME
  44. 44. HOW BRANDS CAN GET IN THE GAME 431 UNDERSTAND WHAT MOTIVATES THEM2 BE THE SOURCE OF INFO THAT PROMPTS THEM TO ACT3 MAKE IT SOCIAL4 USE WHAT YOU’VE GOT5 BE REAL, SHOW THAT THEIR INVOLVEMENT MAKES A REAL DIFFERENCE6 DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE7 CONSIDER STARTING AN L3C WITH THEM8 IGNITE THEIR CREATIVITY9 CONSIDER CROWDSOURCING10 UNDERSTAND AND OVERCOME THE BARRIERS
  45. 45. 1. UNDERSTAND WHAT MOTIVATES THEM 44 There are a handful of classic motivators that drive engagement in altruism, among them: self-interest, being perceived as altruisticto gain social approval, getting back as much as you give and relief from guilt. Here are the top reasons the SMG today say they engage in causes: TOP REASONS THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION ENGAGES IN CAUSES n They feel they ca help 2 They know their involvement will make 1 do something to a difference 5 Getting involved seems fun and social that e information They receiv to act 3 They actively seek out involvement 4 prompts them
  46. 46. 2. BE THE SOURCE OF INFORMATION THAT PROMPTS THEM TO ACT 45 78% try to stay informed about the causes they care about 55% say that staying informed is the top most satisfying engagement in supporting a social cause
  47. 47. 3. MAKE IT SOCIAL 46 A key motivator for the SMG to get involved is that it’s a “fun social thing to do.” Socializing is both currency and entertainment for them, so why not couple their existing behavior with their involvement in causes?1 in 2would engage in a cause with acompany sponsor if they could do itwith their friends1 in 3would be more likely to engage if they coulddo so via their social network
  48. 48. HARNESS THE POWER OF MOBILE 47THE RISE OF MOBILE PHILANTHROPY A recent study conducted among US charitable donors in January, right after the Haiti disaster, found that: 37% of Gen Y respondents considered making a donation to the Haiti relief efforts via text message (compared to 27% of Gen X and only 14% of Boomer respondents) 58% of Gen Y respondents would be willing to contribute to relief efforts after an emergency via text message donations (compared to 43% of Gen X and only 20% of Boomer respondents) (Haiti Mobile Giving Survey Report, January 2010) AND ITS POWER To support the Haiti victims, the Red Cross Amount raised through texting: established its own text donation number $30 Million
  49. 49. 4. USE WHAT YOU’VE GOT 48 60% anies of the SMG believe comp ial ledge to support soc h ave the know causes. 75% of them think that companies have the material resources that cou help social causes ld
  50. 50. 5. BE REAL, SHOW THEIR INVOLVEMENT MAKES A REAL DIFFERENCE 49 The number one motivation for the SMG to engage in social causes centers around authenticity — the sense that they are truly involved in making a difference64%more likely to engage in a socialwould be 72% would engage with a company in acause with a company sponsor if the social cause if they felt it made ancompany’s involvement was large enough actual difference (rather than justand significant enough to make a for show)measurable improvement to the problem
  51. 51. 6. DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE 50 The SMG know brands have the resources, but doubt you have the goodwill to put them to use. So here’s your chance to surprise them. Even though o blame the pr nly1 in 5 ivate sector fo problems relate r social d to poverty, h rights, health a uman nd education majority blam (the e individuals) ... ...Nearlymorally oblig half think you’re ated to helpsocial cause support s Less than 1 in 10 have faith in the non-profit sector in solving issues related to poverty, human rights, health, and education.
  52. 52. THE MOST CREDIBLE WAY BRANDS CAN CREATE SOCIAL CHANGE 51 BRANDS INDIVIDUALSNearly half think you’re 47.5% of the SMGmorally obligated to helpsupport social causes blame individuals for contributing most to creating problems with social issues.But only 4% believe youare best positioned to solve BRANDS SHOULD More believe individualsthese social issues EMPOWER (rather than the public sector, private sector, and non-profits) INDIVIDUAL ACTION are best positioned to solve SSMG’S FAVORITE BRAND these social issues. 9/2010) tation, Mars - (T he TRU Presen
  53. 53. 7. CONSIDER STARTING AN L3C WITH THEM 52More MBA students are pursuing socially responsible business paths, and schools like Duke’s Fuqua School of Business and Yale’sSchool of Management have responded by creating programs to prepare social entrepreneurs. Meanwhile, the government isallowing individual states (like Vermont, Illinois and Michigan) to form L3Cs: low-profit limited liability corporations — for-profitbusinesses whose primary aim is to offer significant social benefits. (Fortune Small Business, 2007), (Daniel Pink Drive, 2010)THE NEW ENTREPRENEURS Entrepreneur s Am erica’s Best Colleges for Social Park, MA Babson College, Babson m New York, NY bia University, Th e Social Enterprise Progra se Ithaca, NY Colum stainable Global Enterpri Cornell Un iversity, The Center for Su Enterprise (CASE), Durha m, NC nter for the Advancement of Social Duke University, The Ce tiative of Boston, MA rvard University, The Social Enterprise Ini hip, NY Ha m in Social Entrepreneurs New York University, The Stewart Satter Progra rd, CA Social Innovation, Stanfo Stanford University, The Center for nt, Tuscon, AZ r College of Manageme rkeley, CA University of Arizona, Elle Center for Responsible Business, Be g Initiative, Boulder, University of California Berkeley, The r for Entrepreneurs hip Sustainable Venturin Cente at Boulder, The Deming University of Colorado CO Haven, CT Social Enterprise, New Yale Un iversity, The Program on e of FSB magazine m the September 2007 Issu Fro THE NEW AGRARIANS Erin Axelrod, who graduated from Barnard last week with an urban studies degree, will not be fighting over the bathroom with her five roommates on the Upper West Side this summer. Instead she will be living in a tent, using an outdoor composting toilet and harvesting vegetables on an organic farm near Petaluma, CA. She’s part of a new wave of liberal arts students who are heading to farms as interns this summer, in search of both work, even if it might pay next to nothing, and social change. The New York Times, 05.23.09
  54. 54. 8. IGNITE THEIR CREATIVITY 53Fewer than 1 in 10 find the most common social engagement activitiessatisfying: attending a meeting or rally, e-mailing or contacting their local representatives,raising money, participating in online activities (other than information sharing), leading ororganizing a group event or organizationARE THEY CYNICAL?The lack of satisfaction may be due to theirlevel of cynicism about making a difference( 40% feel they have no impact on causes nomatter what they do) ...OR ARE THEY BORED?
  55. 55. THE MOST POWERFUL WAY BRANDS CAN CREATE SOCIAL CHANGE 54 SOCIAL SOCIAL CAUSES NETWORKING FUNThere’s an opportunity to link their passions (causes)and activities (social networking) with their creativeabilities (Youtube, digital photography, gaming).
  56. 56. 9. CONSIDER CROWDSOURCING 55While connecting the SMG with their long-tail causes may be a promisingendeavor, brands can benefit from going one step further: use their love forinformation and sharing to actually create a platform for crowdsourced activism. The possibilities are endless: digital sit-ins, homegrown edutainment campaigns and glocal iReporting of social issues
  57. 57. 10. OVERCOME THE BARRIERS 56 TOP 3 REASONS THEY DON’T GET INVOLVED TIME CONSTRAINTS LACK OF OPPORTUNITIES TO GET INVOLVED SKEPTICISM THAT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE 40% of the SMG feel they have no impact on the causes that matter to them most OPPORTUNITIES MAKE IT EASY MAKE IT ACCESSIBLE CONVINCE THEM THEY COUNT
  58. 58. THANK YOU
  59. 59. APPENDIX
  60. 60. CAUSES THAT MOVE THE SOCIAL MEDIA GENERATION
  61. 61. TIMELY TOPICS 60 77% FREEDOM OF SPEECH 65% ONLINE PRIVACY INFORMATION 52% OBESITY
  62. 62. EDUCATION 61 83% QUALITY EDUCATION 79% ACCESS TO EDUCATION 69% LITERACY
  63. 63. HEALTH 62 75% CANCER 72% ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE 61% DISEASES OTHER THAN HIV 61% WOMEN’S HEALTH 59% CHILDHOOD DISEASES 55% HIV/AIDS 50% DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE
  64. 64. HUMAN RIGHTS 63 68% DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 58% WOMEN’S EQUAL RIGHTS 55% CARE OF THE ELDERLY 52% HUMAN TRAFFICKING 50% RACE RELATIONS 47% NON-VIOLENCE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION
  65. 65. POVERTY 64 59% HUNGER 46% HOMELESSNESS/ HOUSING
  66. 66. LONG-TAIL CAUSES 65 41% SUPPORT FOR THE ARTS 40% LGBT RIGHTS 40% FAIR TREATMENT OF IMMIGRANTS 40% WORKING CONDITIONS 29% REFUGEE ASSISTANCE AND AID
  67. 67. THEY KNOW YOU CAN DO IT 66The SMG knows you have the goods to help causes, so don’t let them down. 3 in 4 agree that companies have the material resources to support social causes 60% of them agree companies have the knowledge to help social causes
  68. 68. WHY BRANDS SHOULD CARE
  69. 69. GIVE THEM SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT 68 More than 75% would tell their friends that supports a social c ause. about a company The SMG already spends most of their time communicating with their friends. Why not give your brand a meaningful place in their conversation?
  70. 70. BE REAL TO WIN THEM AND KEEP THEM 69The SMG will reward you with brand affinity and loyalty 3 in 4 would think more company that s highly of a upports a socia l cause s with ort companie 3 in 4 would supp hases and lo yalty if a company were in a purc de a difference truly inv olved and ma cause
  71. 71. THEY WILL SHOW YOU THE MONEY 70The SMG will let social responsibility drive purchase preferences...and talk about it after.Brand loyalties go forward with them into the highest-spending years of their lives. More than 75% prefer to buy from a socially responsible company Once this generation enters their 30s, they will be in the highest consumer spending index category (+270 until age 55)
  72. 72. THEY WILL WORK FOR YOU 71 Top 100 Socially56% would be more likely to seek Responsible Companiesemployment with a socially responsible company

×