TARGETjobs Breakfast News Feb 2013

894 views

Published on

Getting your message across held at The Brasserie at The Cumberland

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
894
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The attacks on America came at a bad time for the world economy. Growth in the US had already come to a standstill in response to the shake-out in the IT and telecoms sectors, and consumer sentiment had also just started to slide. It is now highly likely that the US will suffer a brief recession. Japan is again heading for recession and suffering from deflation. The contagion has spread to Europe, where both Germany and Italy are already becalmed. The size of the shock to the global economy will depend on the overall impact on confidence, especially among consumers in the US, and any disruption to supplies leading to higher prices for some goods and services. But the fact that all the major economies have been hit simultaneously and authorities have the scope to cut interest rates aggressively and introduce a fiscal stimulus, it may turn out to be a briefer slowdown than in the past. Indeed, stronger growth and lower inflation should become evident by the second half of 2002.
  • 100,000 workers from 446 companies ranked their employers.
  • More startlingly the same survey revealed that only 16% of customers will defect based on the quality of products and services. So is indifference or apathy damages the bottom line, engagement is key. Although Epson is essentially an R&D organisation, to meet its aggressive growth targets it will need to make sure that employees are engaged to deliver the best possible products to your target customers. But modern organisations are riddled with unhappy, unproductive, disengaged people. How do you make them care? Quite a challenge.
  • When we asked respondents ‘ what are the most important factors in making you feel proud of your organisation? ’ their priorities were: [read off top 4] So employees are more likely to feel proud if you pay fairly, make a positive impact on your customers ’ lives, give them responsibility and set high standards. The essential theme here appears to be supporting individuals to make a difference. Asking people to identify what drives their own behaviour produces haphazard results at best. To cross-check, we measured the correlation between how well people felt their organisation performed in each factor with the level of pride they felt for the organisation . This indirect method revealed a different set of priorities.
  • [read off top 4] This analysis suggests that organisations can build pride by producing the best products and services they can, setting high standards for quality, looking after customers and treating employees respectfully. It emphasises the importance of building a culture focussed on delivering high standards for everyone – employees, customers and the business as a whole. So to encourage pride in an organisation we recommend first focussing on building a culture of delivering high standards for the customer. To back this up you would then support individuals in making a difference. Pride is an important factor in driving positive behaviour that benefits the organisation and its customers. If people are proud of their organisation they are likely to stay longer, work harder and act as ambassadors for their organisation and its products and services. So we know what makes people feel proud to work for their companies. But once people are proud, how does this affect their attitudes and behaviours? How does this benefit the organisation?
  • The chart offers a trend perspective that shows the Best Global Brands consistently outperform stock market indices.
  • We ’ re often concerned with only the top of the ice-berg.
  • ‘ Too often people branding lives in a silo called recruitment or resourcing. It ought to be something the CEO cares about. ’ Helen Rosethorn, CEO Bernard Hodes in CIPD publication, 2007
  • Unique and distinctive people value proposition (EVP) – ‘ the image that the organisation wishes to reflect to its target audience ’ Consistently communicated in company actions and behaviours Evokes both emotive (e.g. I feel good about working here) and tangible benefits (this organisation cares about my career development) for current and prospective employees Reflected in leadership actions Built into and brought to life by company policies, procedures, and practices. From wikipedia
  • Apple has built up its brand consistency over time with a series of products that reinforce the company's central identity—sleek elegant products that push the boundaries of innovation. This message has never changed although the way they have communicated this over the years has, as they have kept up with modern design standards. This has led to consumer recognition and then trust and loyalty from their customers. Apple have developed a “cult-like” brand and strong identity that is cohesive from their products and promotional material right through to the architecture and interior design of their stores. They employ a minimalist approach in order to showcase what is important to them: their products. This brand consistency leads to familiarity, and familiarity leads to trust. People who purchase Apple products know they will be delivered the brand proposition – “innovative, high quality, great looking products”.
  • Google Innovation Time Off : Google adopted this policy to encourage engineers to spend 20% of their work time on projects that interest them. This has clearly translated to strengthening the brand value as some of Google's primary services (such as Gmail, Google News, Orkut, and AdSense) originated from these independent endeavors. In fact, currently approximately half of all new product launches originated from the Innovation Time Off (Marissa Mayer, VP of Search Products and User Experience). Furthermore, Google was ranked number one on a list of ideal employers (Universum 2011). Not only does this attract future engaged top talent, but strengthens the pride and enthusiasm within the existing workforce.
  • Googleplex – California USA SOURCE: Googleplex, California “ focuses on ideas and innovation as a core part of the operating philosophy. The company encourages innovation with its 80/20 rule, where engineers at Google spend 80% of their work time on their regular job and are allowed another 20% to work on a personal project.” “ Googlers, as the company's 20,000 employees are called, can be seen cavorting on buggies and bikes, playing volleyball and downing wheatgrass shots.” “ In each building, Google seems to promote fitness and your overall well being. There are rock-climbing walls, massage chairs, and helmets for use with any of the dozens of Google bikes scattered around campus. At 26 acres, the campus is large enough that you do need a bike to make it between buildings.” “ As soon as you walk into a Google lobby, you know you're not in a typical office environment. Lava lamps provide a groovy vibe and in some lobbies a piano waits for a skilled musician.” “ Google executives want employees to be able to bounce ideas off each other. It's the company's hope that by encouraging interaction, workers will have greater job satisfaction and may even create the next big Google product. Employees can personalize their workstations as much as they like, and even bring dogs to work if they want to.”
  • Amazon become the largest Internet retailer and is continually expanding its global presence. However, although Amazon was a pioneer in e-commerce, electronic books and reading devices and cloud computing, it has lagged in social networking and social media, leaving Facebook and Zynga as leaders in the area. Now, i n conjunction with global dominance, Amazon is actively growing its social media presence rapidly - the key factor in growing its brand strength. Recent moves by Amazon have been to hire a director of social media , John Yurcisin, from Ogilvy & Mather earlier this year to help the company formulate social strategies. Amazon is also building a Social Games Group to take on Zynga, the leader in the space. Other moves include adding Twitter and Facebook social networking features to its popular Kindle e-book offering. Kindle e-book readers can now send public notes about sections of the book they are reading and this is integrated with people's Twitter and Facebook contacts.
  • Amazon continually improve their product and service One click ordering Reccomendation / personalisation Etc etc FedEx And UPS strive for this too
  • “ We rely on our reach, experience and people to develop our extensive expertise McKinsey's expertise comes from decades of working with the world's top leaders and organizations, our continuous investment in knowledge development, and the talent and experience of our people, many of whom are among the most accomplished professionals in their chosen industry or sector. ” http://www.mckinsey.com/careers/is_mckinsey_right_for_me/roles_and_career_paths/join_a_practice.aspx
  • The man in the background is in fancy dress and is clearly wearing a chain mail vest. He probably knows exactly what is going on with national security.
  • Deloitte 02/07/13
  • Bank of America
  • Barclays, BDO, Bloomberg, Boots, Boston Consulting Group, Citi
  • Barclays, BDO, Bloomberg, Boots, Boston Consulting Group, Citi
  • Deloitte, Ernst & young, Goldman Sachs, Grant Thornton, HSBC
  • We ’ re putting on the Mikado again this year…
  • TARGETjobs Breakfast News Feb 2013

    1. 1. GETTING YOURMESSAGE ACROSS
    2. 2. BRYAN FINN 1954–2012
    3. 3. FIVE BREAKFAST NEWS EVENTS IN 2013• • • • • 
    4. 4. WE WANT TO HEARFROM YOU VIATWITTER
    5. 5. WWW.BREAKFAST-NEWS.COM
    6. 6. THE GUARDIAN UK 300 - 2013 •  2013 list has been confirmed •  Ranking will be revealed mid-April •  Opportunities to appear NOW! •  30 unique editorial slots •  100,000 copies sent to UK campuses in September 2013 •  we’ll be in touch!
    7. 7. Shortlists now online – find outthe winners on 3 April 2013 atLondon’s Grosvenor House To buy tickets or a table go to www.targetjobsawards.co.uk or call 020 7061 1927
    8. 8. AGENDA FOR TODAY THE ECONOMIC FORECASTIS GRADUATE RECRUITMENT CHANGING? GETTING YOUR MESSAGE ACROSS WHAT ARE YOU SAYING?
    9. 9. THE ECONOMICFORECAST
    10. 10. THE RECESSION IS OVER
    11. 11. A DEEP RECESSION QUARTERLY 4.0 ANNUAL Long-term average 2.0 0.0% -2.0 -4.0 -6.0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    12. 12. BUT A FRAGILE RECOVERY
    13. 13. LEGACY ISSUES
    14. 14. CONSUMERS WERE THE DRIVING FORCE 7 CONSUMER SPENDING 6 RETAIL SALES 5 4 3% CHANGE 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
    15. 15. BUT UNDERPINNED BY BORROWING15 165 % INTEREST REPAYMENTS/DISPOSABLE INCOMES(LHS)% 15513 DEBT / DISPOSABLE INCOMES(RHS) 14511 1359 1257 1155 1053 951 85 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008-1 75
    16. 16. THE BIG HOUSEHOLD SQUEEZE 6 6 Inflation Earnings 4 4 2 2 % annual growth % annual growth 0 0 Real household income* -2 -2 -4 -4 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
    17. 17. UNEMPLOYMENT STUBBORNLY HIGH 2,000 7 6 1,750 Unemployed 000s (L axis) Unemployment rate (R axis) 5 1,500 % of workforceNumber 000s 4 1,250 3 1,000 2 750 1 500 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    18. 18. A DIFFICULT CONSUMER ENVIRONMENT 5.5 4.5 CONSUMER 3.5 2.5% CHANGE 1.5 0.5 -0.5 -1.5 -2.5 -3.5 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    19. 19. SURGE IN PUBLIC SECTORBORROWING
    20. 20. GOVERNMENT FINANCES WEAKENED 20 50 15 45 CURRENT EXPENDITURE (RHS) 10 40 5% of GDP CURRENT REVENUE (RHS) % of GDP 35 0 30 -5 SURPLUS/DEFICIT (LHS) 25 -10 -15 20 1999/00 2001/02 2003/04 2005/06 2007/08 2009/10
    21. 21. SO NET DEBT (AS A % OF GDP) SOARED Autumn Statement, December 2012 73 65 57% of GDP 49 41 Sustainable Investment Rule 33 25 1990-91 1992 1994-95 1996 1998-99 2000 2002-03 2004 2006-07 2008 2010-11 2112 2114-15 2116
    22. 22. GOVT RECEIPTS AND SPENDING 55 Autumn Statement, December 2012 50 % of GDP 45 40 35 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
    23. 23. NEW ISSUES
    24. 24. EUROZONE FRAGILITY
    25. 25. IN THE WRONG PLACES 60 60 Western Europe Share of UK exports (goods & services): Central & Eastern Europe BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) 40 40 Euro Area southern fringe (Greece, Spain, Italy, Portugal) % % 20 20 0 0 1998 2003 2008
    26. 26. GETTING THE DEBT DOWN 130 130 120 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 120 110 110 100 100 % of GDP % of GDP 90 90 80 80 70 70 60 60 50 50 Euro Area France Germany Italy
    27. 27. GETTING THE DEBT DOWN 160 160 150 150 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 140 140 130 130 120 120 % of GDP % of GDP 110 110 100 100 90 90 80 80 70 70 60 60 50 50 Greece Portugal Spain Belgium
    28. 28. IMBALANCES: THE KEY TO DEBT 250 250 Germany Ireland Italy Spain Greece Portugal 200 200 150 150 Current account balances 100 100 € bn, annual totals € bn, annual totals 50 50 0 0 -50 -50 -100 -100 -150 -150 -200 -200 -250 -250 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
    29. 29. ALL STICKS AND NO CARROTS 6 6 Euro Area Greece Portugal Spain 4 4 GDP growth 2010 2 2011 2 % 2012 % 0 0 2013 -2 -2 -4 -4 -6 -6 -8 -8
    30. 30. OUTLOOK
    31. 31. INFLATION – LIKELY TO EASE 6 5 Forecast 4 % change month on month 3 2 Target Range 1 0 CPI RPI -1 -2 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
    32. 32. INTEREST RATES TO STAY LOW 7 6 Forecast 5 % 4 3 2 1 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
    33. 33. SO STERLING TO REMAIN COMPETITIVE 2.1 1.5 2.0 US$ / £ 1.4 (L axis) 1.9 Forecast 1.3 1.8 euro / £ (R $/£ axis ) €/£ 1.7 1.2 1.6 Sterling weaker 1.1 1.5 1.4 1.0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
    34. 34. WHERE IS GROWTH COMINGFROM?GDP (100%) = Consumer spending (64%)
    35. 35. REAL EARNINGS GROWING AGAIN6% Consumer price inflation5 Average earnings growth43210-1 Real earnings growth-2-3-4 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
    36. 36. DEBT REPAYMENT UNDERWAY 175 175 150 Household debt:income ratios 150 125 125 % % 100 100 75 75 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
    37. 37. % CHANGE -3.5 -2.5 -1.5 -0.5 0.5 1.5 2.5 3.5 4.519 5.5 9119 9219 9319 9419 95 CONSUMER19 9619 9719 9819 9920 0020 0120 0220 0320 0420 0520 0620 0720 0820 0920 1020 1120 1220 13 A SLOW CONSUMER RECOVERY20 14 Forecast
    38. 38. WHERE IS GROWTH COMING FROM?GDP (100%) = Consumer spending (64%) + Investment (15%)
    39. 39. CORPORATE SECTOR IN GOOD SHAPE 80 18 Operating surplus and profitability of UK private non-financial companies 70 Gross operating surplus 16 60 14 Profitability £ billion % 50 12 40 10 30 8 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
    40. 40. BUT COMPANIES NOT SPENDING 120 140 Level of investment (R axis) Investment by 130 110 Private Non-financial Corporations 120 100 110 100 90 Investment relative to post-tax surplus £ billion (L axis) % 90 80 80 70 70 60 60 50 50 40 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011
    41. 41. INVESTMENT TO PICK UP……AT LAST 24 20 Business 16 Forecast – OBR 2012 Investment 12 8 % annual growth 4 0 -4 -8 -12 -16 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    42. 42. WHERE IS GROWTH COMING FROM?GDP (100%) = Consumer spending (64%) + Investment (15%) + Government spending (23%)
    43. 43. GETTING THE DEFICIT DOWN 180 12 Net borrowing (L axis) 150 10 % of GDP* (R axis) 120 8 £ bn % 90 6 60 4 30 2 0 0 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016-17
    44. 44. WHERE IS GROWTH COMING FROM?GDP (100%) = Consumer spending (64%) + Govt consumption (23%) + Investment (15%) + Net trade (-2%) (Exports 30% – Imports 32%)
    45. 45. EXPORTS STARTING TO RESPOND 30 Goods Services 20 Annual Percentage change 10 0 -10 -20 -30 15/03/2002 15/03/2003 15/03/2004 15/03/2005 15/03/2006 15/03/2007 15/03/2008 15/03/2009 15/03/2010 15/03/2011
    46. 46. LIGHT AT THE END OF THETUNNEL
    47. 47. SLUGGISH GROWTH AS GOOD AS IT GETS 3.0 Long-term average 2.0 QUARTERLY Forecast 1.0 ANNUAL 0.0 -1.0 % -2.0 -3.0 -4.0 -5.0 -6.0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
    48. 48. THANK YOU
    49. 49. IS GRADUATERECRUITMENTCHANGING?
    50. 50. WHAT HAS CHANGED(OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS)
    51. 51. CHANGES IN PRIORITIES
    52. 52. CHANGES IN RESOURCES
    53. 53. CHANGES IN THE MEDIALANDSCAPE
    54. 54. CHANGES TO THE EMPLOYERBRAND
    55. 55. CHANGES IN THE QUALITY OFGRADUATES RECRUITED
    56. 56. CHANGES IN THE PROFILE OFGRADUATE RECRUITMENT WITHIN THEBUSINESS
    57. 57. WHAT WILL CHANGE(IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS)
    58. 58. CHANGES TO TALENT ENTRYROUTES• • • • 
    59. 59. CHANGING PRIORITIES INGRADUATE ATTRACTION
    60. 60. CHANGES IN DELIVERY OFGRADUATE RECRUITMENT• • • • 
    61. 61. THINGS HAVE CHANGED AND WILL CONTINUE TO CHANGE BUT EVOLUTION, NOTREVOLUTION
    62. 62. GETTING YOURMESSAGE ACROSS
    63. 63. PRODUCTS PEOPLE ANDAND SERVICES BEHAVIOURSENVIRONMENTS COMMUNICATIONSAND CHANNELS
    64. 64. CLARITYCONSISTENCYLEADERSHIP
    65. 65. GETTING YOURMESSAGE ACROSS
    66. 66. DOWNLOA WATCH D IPHONE VIDEO ON APP PHONE SEARCH COMPAR LIKE US E SHOP ON ONLINE FACEBOOK WATCH YOUTUBE COMMERCIA L BUY ITEM DEMO PRODUCT IN STORE VIEW PRINT AD WATCH TUTORIAL SHOP ON WEBSITE READREAD REVIEWSBLOG VIEW BANNER AD
    67. 67. WHAT MAKES YOU PROUD AT WORK? They pay fairly compared to the competition 66% They have a positive impact on people’s lives 65% They give me responsibility to make a difference 63% They set high standards for the quality of work 61%They are well known for looking after their customers 61% They treat employees respectfully 60%Their products or services are seen as being the best 56% They are praised for their ethical standards 51% They give back to the community 48% They have a celebrated heritage 45% They consistently produce great financial results 44% They have inspiring senior managers 42% They are represented positively in the media 38% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Ranking score (%)
    68. 68. WHICH FACTORS SHOW THE STRONGEST CORRELATION? Their products or services are seen as being the best 0.63 They set high standards for the quality of work 0.52 They are well known for looking after their customers 0.47 They treat employees respectfully 0.44 They have inspiring senior managers 0.39 They give me responsibility to make a difference 0.38 They have a positive impact on peoples lives 0.36 They pay fairly compared to the competition 0.35 They are praised for their ethical standards 0.34 They are represented positively in the media 0.34 They consistently produces great financial results 0.31 They give back to the community 0.27 They have a celebrated heritage 0.23 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 Correlation score
    69. 69. “ to promote the development ofChina’s brand commodities so as tobenefit the world’s people .development of brand commoditiesconcerns China’s economic growthand social progress”
    70. 70. 250200150100 50 0 Interbrand Top 100 Portfolio MSCI World Index S&P 500 Index
    71. 71. BEST GLOBAL BRANDS BY SECTOR Sector Breakdown FINANCIAL SERVICES 14 ELECTRONICS 14 FMCG 11 AUTOMOTIVE 12 ALCOHOL 7 LUXURY 7 BUSINESS SERVICES 5 DIVERSIFIED 5 BEVERAGES 4 INTERNET SERVICES 4 RESTAURANTS 4 APPAREL 3 MEDIA 3 COMPUTER SOFTWARE 2 SPORTING GOODS 2 ENERGY 1 HOME FURNISHINGS 1 TRANSPORTATION 1
    72. 72. Names Visual identity External communications Product ranges Vision Values Business processesTraining and recruitment Management controls Sense of purpose Methods of rewardsShared sense of fate Employee communication Beliefs and personality Clear brand strategy
    73. 73. BRAND AS CENTRAL ORGANISING PRINCIPLEFROM THIS: TO THIS: FINANCE FINANCE HR HR SALES SALES MARKETING BUSINESS MARKETING BRAND TRADITIONAL BUSINESS BRAND STRATEGY STRATEGY COMMUNICATION STRATEGY STRATEGY MANUFACTURING/ MANUFACTURING/ RETAIL OPERATIONS RETAIL OPERATIONS DISTRIBUTION DISTRIBUTION R&D R&D
    74. 74. Business Brand HRstrategy strategy strategy & practice
    75. 75. PRODUCTS PEOPLE ANDAND SERVICES BEHAVIOURS BRANDENVIRONMENTS COMMUNICATIONSAND CHANNELS
    76. 76. People & Behaviours Products & ServicesAppraisals Offer lettersFeedback mechanisms Induction packsCareer customisation Learning and development programmesCompetencies & Behaviours Flexible working practicesDevelopmentPerformance management People Comp. & Bens Advice and guidance for non HR colleaguesEnvironment/channels Brand CommunicationsHow people feel when they walk into your office IntranetInterview rooms and experience Milk-roundsOrganisational design (team structure) Referral programmesJob mobility Recruitment advertisingRecruitment fairs NewslettersRoadshows Social medis
    77. 77. CLARITYCONSISTENCY
    78. 78. CLARITYCONSISTENCYLEADERSHIP
    79. 79. STRONG PEOPLE BRANDS SHARE5 KEY TRAITS1. Distinctive stance and reputation as an employer2. Evokes both emotive and tangible benefits3. Built into and brought to life by company policies, procedures, and practices4. Consistently communicated in company actions and behaviours5. Modelled by leadership
    80. 80. VISIONMan is the creator of change in this world andshould not be subordinate to machines orsystems.MISSIONProviding human tools. Dedicated to theempowerment of man, helping change the way wework, learn and communicate.VALUESIndividualistic, thinking differently, clarity, clever.
    81. 81. PRODUCTS PEOPLE ANDAND SERVICES BEHAVIOURS BRANDENVIRONMENTS COMMUNICATIONSAND CHANNELS
    82. 82. DELIVERING THE BRANDPRODUCTS AND SERVICES PEOPLE AND BEHAVIOURS HUMANISING TECHNOLOGYENVIRONMENTS AND CHANNELS COMMUNICATIONS
    83. 83. GOOGLE – LANGUAGE AND TONE OF VOICE• • • • • • • • 
    84. 84. CLEAR ANDCONSISTENT BRANDIDENTITY
    85. 85. BMW – CONSISTENT TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT“At BMW Brand Academy, we trainstaff and produce training materialsaround the BMW brand, as well asbringing best practice and knowledgefor the management to share”
    86. 86. ‘Our mission is to be the earth’s mostcustomer-centric company it’s the job ofevery person in this company to reinforcethe culture, including me.’
    87. 87. “We are thrilled to create the first ever ‘Tweetwalk show’in partnership with Twitter”.Christopher Bailey, Burberry Chief Creative Officer
    88. 88. •  Consistent rigorous training programs• Fact based and hypotheses• Call assignments “engagements”• Confidentiality is cardinal• Never work alone, always in a team• Coaching/ mentoring as soon as you arrive
    89. 89. BEST PRACTICE? GOLDMAN SACHS
    90. 90. GOLDMAN SACHS - LANGUAGE• Excerpts from the Goldman Sachs Business Principles•  superior returns to our shareholders•  profitability is critical•  uncompromising determination to achieve excellence•  We make an unusual effort to identify and recruit the very best person forevery job. Although our activities are measured in billions of dollars, we selectour people one by one•  Being diverse is not optional; it is what we must be.•  We have no room for those who put their personal interests ahead of theinterests of the firm and its clients.•  The dedication of our people to the firm and the intense effort they givetheir jobs are greater than one finds in most other organizations.•  We consider our size an asset that we try hard to preserve•  Our business is highly competitive, and we aggressively seek to expand ourclient relationships .
    91. 91. GOLDMAN SACHS - LANGUAGE• Excerpts from the Goldman Sachs Business Principles•  superior returns to our shareholders•  profitability is critical•  uncompromising determination to achieve excellence•  We make an unusual effort to identify and recruit the very best person forevery job. Although our activities are measured in billions of dollars, we selectour people one by one•  Being diverse is not optional; it is what we must be.•  We have no room for those who put their personal interests ahead ofthe interests of the firm and its clients.•  The dedication of our people to the firm and the intense effort they givetheir jobs are greater than one finds in most other organizations.•  We consider our size an asset that we try hard to preserve•  Our business is highly competitive, and we aggressively seek to expand ourclient relationships .
    92. 92. “In a future where physical and virtual worlds will blend every brand will have the possibility of becoming both a powerful medium and a power retailer - if they canquickly build strong enough relationships.” The Future of Brands
    93. 93. DOWNLOAD WATCH IPHONE APP VIDEO ON PHONE SEARCH COMPARE LIKE US SHOP ON ONLINE FACEBOOK WATCH YOUTUBE COMMERCIAL BUY ITEM DEMO PRODUCT IN STORE VIEW PRINT AD WATCH TUTORIAL SHOP ON WEBSITE READ REVIEWSREADBLOG VIEW BANNER AD
    94. 94. CLARITYCONSISTENCYLEADERSHIP
    95. 95. THE BENEFITS OF HAVING A PEOPLE BRAND –  Higher levels of staff retention and therefore reduced staff turnover costs –  Reduced candidate attraction costs as people want to work for your organisation –  Reduced recruitment costs as you attract higher performers –  Higher employee morale and potentially greater productivity –  The opportunity to build and reinforce the culture and work practices of the organisation both internally and externally –  Making your overall corporate brand more valued and valuable
    96. 96. WHAT AREYOU SAYING?
    97. 97. Change is theonly constant.
    98. 98. Rip VanWashington Irving, 1819 Winkle
    99. 99. <---------------18cm------------> <---------------------26cm--------------------->Your true nature mayonly emerge when youfind yourself cornered.
    100. 100. THE TROPESCOPE
    101. 101. A ‘TROPE’ ORIGINALLY MEANT AFIGURATIVE EXPRESSION, BUTINCREASINGLY IT IS TAKEN TO MEANTHOSE COMMON CONVENTIONS,DEVICES AND CLICHĒS FOUND INCREATIVE WORKS.
    102. 102. Trope #1A young person holds up a sign withSOMETHING WRITTEN ON IT.
    103. 103. Bob Dylan - Subterranean Homesick Blues, 1965
    104. 104. 2007
    105. 105. 2008
    106. 106. 2007
    107. 107. 2011
    108. 108. Trope #2Young people jump into the air inunison, expressing joy and excitementthat scarce may be contained.
    109. 109. Cultural reference: A-level results day in the local press
    110. 110. 2002
    111. 111. 2002
    112. 112. 2001
    113. 113. 2009
    114. 114. The question facing creative teams in themiddle of the first decade of the twenty-first century was, “Can we create evenmore visual impact and exhilaration thanwe have seen here?”
    115. 115. The question facing creative teams in themiddle of the first decade of the twenty-first century was, “Can we create evenmore visual impact and exhilaration thanwe have seen here?” The answer was, “Yes we can.”
    116. 116. THE DIATROPEIn which two tropes are combined tocreate an impact that is EVEN MOREstriking than the sum of its parts.
    117. 117. 2009
    118. 118. Trope #3Young persons sitting on strangethings in high places, the better toview their future prospects.
    119. 119. 2007 2013
    120. 120. Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceedinghigh mountain, and showeth him all the kingdomsof the world, and the glory of them; and saith untohim, All these things will I give thee, if thou wiltfall down and worship me.Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan:for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thyGod, and him only shalt thou serve. The Gospel According to St Matthew, Chapter 4, Verses 8-10
    121. 121. Trope #4The re-purposing of the classic jigsawpuzzle to express the integration of the skillsand sensibilities of the individual with theculture and purposes of the enterprise.
    122. 122. 2013
    123. 123. Trope #5Typographical noodling that seeks toinvest a commonplace thought withanarchic energy and graphic vitality.
    124. 124. 2013
    125. 125. What dire offence from amrous causes springs,What mighty contests rise from trivial things… The Rape of the Lock, Alexander Pope, 1712
    126. 126. What dire offence from amrous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things“I wanted to give it more impact, it’s like a word cloud, right ?” Graphic design early 21st century.
    127. 127. Trope #6Tragic hubris that sometimesprovokes the gods to wrath.
    128. 128. 2007
    129. 129. Trope #7Exploring the unique and limitlesspotential of recruitment language.
    130. 130. The Inexorable Rise of the Big Four2001 2006 2012
    131. 131. Experts at the heart of a new economyHelping power our ambition to remain the foremost professional services firm in the world are a wealth of highlytalented graduates, enjoying work of spectacular range and variety.A career worth aspiring toAmbition is a good thing. So are aspirations. Ours have helped to keep us ahead in the global marketplace forprofessional services. It’s the ambition of exceptional individuals like you that has helped us achieve our goals. Foryou, it’s the promise of a career that can take you further – and faster – than you ever thought possible.Step into the best career in businessAn extraordinary future in business opens up when you join us. Few will be able to match the network you’ll build, theexposure you’ll gain and the expertise you’ll develop with us. In fact, we’ll give you all you need to become someonethe world’s biggest businesses turn to for advice. A superlative decade
    132. 132. Face challenges with confidence. Nimbly navigate every obstacle in your path. It’s thatunique quality that’s positioned you where you are today. And it’s what we value here.Join our team and we’ll open your career path and give you new opportunities to take thepossible and make it real. We’ll solicit your input and provide training, mentorship andsupport to boost your aspirations to a global level. And as part of the world’s leadingfinancial institution, you can create the kind of opportunity that begets greater opportunityand bigger impact than you ever imagined. What the Dickens
    133. 133. Your unleashed potential is our most powerful asset. Your ideas, ambition andtalent have the power to drive the future of our business. We reward yourcommitment by offering you unparalleled training, support and globalopportunities – because we see cultivating top talent as a critical businessopportunity, not just a nice-to-have. So expect to be stretched. Expect to gofurther, faster and higher. And expect to have your potential fulfilled. Good Heavens Missus
    134. 134. In the knowledge economy ideas are the new currency. Here theideas of our people are literally re-shaping the business world. Ittakes a particular type of mind to play a full part: Intelligent. Lateral.Curious. For those who aren’t satisfied with just part of the picture,we offer the widest possible perspective. Clients large and small,well-established and newly-founded. Projects which spanmanagement consulting, risk, tax, law and every other discipline Death Star 2002
    135. 135. An extraordinary future in business opens up when you join us. Few will be able to match the network you’ll build, the exposure you’ll gain and the expertiseyou’ll develop with us. In fact, we’ll give you all you need to become someone the world’s biggest businesses turn to for advice. It’s your future. How far will youtake it?Our clients across the world demand people with exceptional skills and knowledge to help them make vital business decisions every day. That’s why we provideworld-class mentoring, training and professional qualifications to take you from strength to strength.If you’re the kind of person who can’t wait to make a difference, consider a career here. We believe that good ideas and innovations can come from anyone, atany level. We offer meaningful opportunities, best-in-class training and a wide variety of career paths for talented people from all academic backgrounds. Plus,with access to important clients and projects, you’ll have the chance to make an impact with global significance.Some advice just states the obvious. But the kind of insight that adds real value to dynamic organisations, such as our clients, takes reason, instinct and theconfidence to challenge assumptions right from day one. You’ll enjoy tough challenges, seek out opportunities and be ready to kick start a career as a trustedadviser at the heart of business.The way the world does business is changing. We’ve invested in an economic future led by emerging markets and grounded in established economies. That’swhy we’re looking for graduates with open minds, international perspectives and a focus on change. We can offer exposure to global markets and experience,training and experts that will prepare you for a long and successful career.Unless you’ve grown up in a boardroom, things like dealing with corporate politics, working directly with big business clients, having to travel at short notice,having to report to someone, knowing when to express your opinion and when to keep schtum are unknown quantities to you right now. Rest assured though,we get that and will give you the training, development and support you need to deal with every aspect of your new working world.Do you have bursting ambition? If you can lead and inspire as part of a team, take the next step now towards applying to work for a world-class business.Your career is just that, yours. You choose it. You live it. You make it happen. To get the best from it, you need the best opportunities. That’s why opportunity isat the heart of a career with us. Opportunities to grow as an individual, to build lasting relationships and make an impact in a place where people, quality andvalue mean everything.The fresh-thinking you generate. The conversations you instigate. The skills you develop. The relationships you grow. The unique contribution you make willhelp shape the future of our organisation. You’ll need to be able to work in a constantly changing environment and there will be plenty of challenges along theway – but, in return, you can expect to build a truly rewarding career. Ready to make a lasting difference?
    136. 136. Tropes are teleologicallyambiguous and subjective:how are we to chart ourcritical landscape withoutnumerical expression?
    137. 137. The Portland-Kirby Index®Towards a thematic and contextual taxonomy ofsemiological concepts employed in twenty-first-century graduate marketing. Work Group © 2012
    138. 138. Abstract wibblingThe Portland-Kirby Index® Bonkers/impenetrable Children are our futureA theoretical construct based Core brand Foreign partson forced-recall studies with Gamessalient target audiences. Not this but that Our offices Product Smiley faces Stories TypographicalWork Group © 2012 Visual metaphors
    139. 139. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 1: “Abstract wibbling”If you don’t have time to think through what youwant to say, abstract expressionism may be theway to go. Chuck it all in, but beware ofunfortunate juxtapositions
    140. 140. The most obvious answerto the question is“job centre plus” 2013
    141. 141. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 2: “Bonkers/Impenetrable”Sometimes, you just wish you had been at themeeting where the idea was presented - andbought. It probably made sense at the time
    142. 142. 2007
    143. 143. 2007
    144. 144. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 3: “Children are our future”EITHER, (i) the emotive use of a winsome infant to impart thesocial and community value of your contribution; OR (ii) the childas symbolic quintessence of idealistic, all-is-possible aspiration. 2013
    145. 145. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 13: “Visual metaphors”(Class 13a: “Signposts”)Signposts are often used to symbolise a choiceof direction, either in literal geographical terms oras a broader metaphor for career options.
    146. 146. 2001
    147. 147. 2010
    148. 148. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 13: “Visual metaphors”(Class 13b: “Living things”)Flora and fauna-based metaphors may be used to borrowdynamism and meaning from the natural world. It is important toselect organisms that resonate with the target audience.
    149. 149. 2007
    150. 150. 2007
    151. 151. 2012, 2013 Fruit & Veg
    152. 152. PORTLAND-KIRBY INDEXPhylum 7: “Not this, but that ”Oft beginning with a presumptuous summary ofthe reader’s misconceptions and prejudices, thewriter offers to share a profundity that would elsebe hidden from the common intelligence
    153. 153. 2007
    154. 154. 2007
    155. 155. Abstract wibblingThe Portland-Kirby Index®: Bonkers/impenetrable Children are our futurea thematic and contextual Core brandtaxonomy of conceptual Foreign parts Gamestreatments employed Not this but that Our officesin twenty-first-century Productgraduate marketing. Smiley faces Stories TypographicalWork Group © 2012 Visual metaphors
    156. 156. A multivariate regression analysis using the Portland-KirbyIndex provides compelling proof that creativity in graduatemarketing is not infinite, but ordered by structured andlimited rules, the close examination of which can provideclues to the state of the economy.
    157. 157. 2001/20022006/20072012/2013
    158. 158. What this meansfor the economy.
    159. 159. What does the world leader in marketing communications recommend?
    160. 160. I lied...
    161. 161. Two glorious pieces ofgraduate communication
    162. 162. 2013
    163. 163. SMILEY, HAPPY FACE [ ]BRAND CHECK [ ]ARBITRARY RANKING [ ]MISCHIEVOUS WORDPLAY [ ]INVESTOR IN PEOPLE [ ]
    164. 164. 2013
    165. 165. THE NEXTBREAKFAST NEWS –THURSDAY25 APRIL

    ×