Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Fit for the future of work?

111 views

Published on

GTI Breakfast News 25 September 2018 - Fit for the future of work?

Published in: Recruiting & HR
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Fit for the future of work?

  1. 1. Welcome and GTI update Simon Rogers Director, GTI
  2. 2. 2018 dates 14 March 24 May 25 September 5 December
  3. 3. We want to hear from you via twitter #BNews18
  4. 4. Todays agenda Welcome and GTI update Simon Rogers, Director, GTI The economic update Declan Curry, Broadcaster, Business and Economics Journalist An agile future Stephen Isherwood, CEO, Institute of Student Employers Holograms & Rocket Packs Andrew Baird, Director of Consulting, Blackbridge Communications The Rise of the Zombie Jobs: machines, robots and the future of work Dr Paul Redmond, Director of Student Experience and Enhancement, University of Liverpool Are they prepared? Rt. Hon Nicky Morgan MP, Former Secretary of State for Education & MP for Loughborough
  5. 5. Out on campus
  6. 6. Micro targeting With over 1 million member profiles on TARGETjobs, find candidates who match your exact criteria by unlocking exclusive data fields including work experience, skills and diversity through Talent Match. Send highly personalised messages directly to candidate’s member profiles. Alerted to your message, our members can accept or decline your request. When they accept, you gain full access to their profile, allowing you to follow up directly with the candidate. Talent Match direct Direct phone calls on your behalf to our most engaged members Targeted banner advertising All banners on site and in email can be targeted at any logged in members by their profile data fields
  7. 7. trendence Research: Helping Campus Recruiting David Palmer UK & Ireland Research Manager
  8. 8. The trendence UK Graduate Study 70,000+ students take part 125+ universities surveyed Data collected on 400+ employers Detailed diversity data
  9. 9. Large sample, more detailed uni data 70,000+ students 1,534 at Glasgow
  10. 10. Campus stats: breaking it down How do students rank employers? Which competitors have students seen on campus? Which on-campus activities do students want you to do? Do students attend careers fairs?
  11. 11. Report: Glasgow University Rank Employer % 1 Google 12.6% 2 Penguin Random House 11.0% 3 Channel 4 Television 9.6% 4 Civil Service Fast Stream 9.0% 5 MI6 - Secret Intelligence Service 8.8% 6 European Commission 8.0% 7 British Council 7.3% 7 J.P. Morgan 7.3% 9 EY 6.5% 10 MI5 - The Security Service 6.2% Most frequently seen employers: EY PwC KPMG The Royal Bank of Scotland J.P. Morgan Careers fairs
  12. 12. The 2019 trendence Graduate Study is in field now!
  13. 13. Thank you Simon Rogers Director, GTI
  14. 14. The Economic Update Declan Curry Broadcaster, Business and Economics Journalist
  15. 15. Highlights • Growth: +0.6% q/q (May-July) • Prices: +2.7% y/y (Aug) • Wages: +2.9% (y/y, ex bonus, July) • Employment: +261,000 y/y (July) • Unemployment: -95,000 y/y (July) • Productivity: +1.5% y/y (Q2 2018) • Interest rates rise to: 0.75% (August) Source: ONS / Bank of England / House of Commons Library
  16. 16. Growth • GDP May – July 2018: +0.6% (3m/3m; vs Feb-Apr) prev: April – June 2018: +0.4% (3m/3m) • Services: +0.6% • Manufacturing: -0.1% • Construction: +3.3% (“Beast” rebound) • Biz Investment: +0.8% Source: ONS / House of Commons Library
  17. 17. Growth International comparisons (all Q2 2018, y/y) : • USA: +2.9% • G7: +2.2% • Germany: +1.9% • France: +1.7% • UK: +1.3% • Japan: +1.3% Source: ONS / OECD / House of Commons Library
  18. 18. Prices & wages • CPI Inflation: +2.7% y/y (Aug ‘18) prev: +2.5% y/y (July ‘18) • Avg weekly wages (GB): +2.9% y/y ex bonus (Jul ’18) +2.6% y/y inc bonus • Private sector wages: +2.6% y/y (3m Jul’18) • Public sector wages: +2.4% y/y (3m July ’18) Source: ONS / House of Commons Library
  19. 19. Job market • Employment: 32.4 million people in work +261,000 y/y (May-Jul 18) 75.5% of working population • Unemployment: 1.36 million unemployed -95,000 y/y (May-Jul 18) Rate 4%; lowest since 1975 • Youth unemployment: Down 40,000 y/y; rate 11.3% Source: ONS / House of Commons Library
  20. 20. Productivity • Productivity: +1.5% y/y (Q2 2018) - best since end of 2016; still below historical avg +2% - stagnated between 2008 & 2017 • UK productivity = 10% below Italy; = 22% below USA & France; = 26% below Germany. Source: ONS / OECD / Eurostat / House of Commons Library
  21. 21. Confidence • Manufacturing PMI: 52.8 (Aug) vs 53.8 (Jul) - expecting expansion, but less confident than July • Services PMI: 54.3 (Aug) vs 53.5 (Jul) - expecting expansion, and more confident than July • Consumer index: -7 (Aug) vs -10 (Jul) - better than July, but still mildly gloomy Source: ONS / CIPS / GfK NOP / House of Commons Library
  22. 22. Housing & retail • UK House Price Index: +3.1% y/y (July) prev: +3.2% y/y (June) • London prices: -0.7% y/y (July) • Mortgage approvals: -6.1% y/y (July) • Housing starts: -8% y/y (Q1 2018) • Retail sales (volume): +3.4% y/y (August) • Online sales: +14% y/y (August) Source: ONS / Land Registry / Bank of England / House of Commons Library
  23. 23. Trade Trade deficit widens in Q2 2018 …. • UK exports: £156.5 bn Q2; -£0.3bn q/q • UK imports: £162.5 bn Q2; +£2.5bn q/q 2017: UK buys more than it sells; narrower gap than 2016 • Exports: £616 billion; +10.6% • Imports: £640 billion; +8.8% 44% of UK exports to EU; 53% of imports from EU in 2017 Source: ONS / House of Commons Library
  24. 24. Debt • Household debt: 134% of disposable income Peak = 148% in Q1 2008; fell to 127% in late 2015 • New Govt borrowing: £39.9bn 2017/18 -£5.6bn vs 2016/17 • Deficit: 1.9% (17/18); -0.4%pts y/y • Net Debt (% of GDP): 84.3 (Aug); -1.8% y/y • Net Debt (value): £1,782 billion Source: ONS / Bank of England / House of Commons Library
  25. 25. Markets • UK interest rates: 0.75% - unchanged Sept; increased by 0.25%pts in August • £1 = $1.29 (avg Aug); -0.6% y/y • £1 = €1.12 (avg Aug); +1.7% y/y • Shares - FTSE 100: 7,367 (20 Sept); +1% y/y • Oil – Brent Crude: $78.70 (20 Sept); +40% y/y • Gold: $1,203.30 (20 Sept); -8% y/y • Source: Bank of England / FT / House of Commons Library
  26. 26. Thank you Declan Curry Broadcaster, Business and Economics Journalist
  27. 27. An agile future Stephen Isherwood, CEO, Institute of Student Employers
  28. 28. “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.” Bill Gates
  29. 29. Thank you Stephen Isherwood, CEO, Institute of Student Employers
  30. 30. Holograms & Rocket Packs Andrew Baird Director of Consulting, Blackbridge Communications
  31. 31. ‘Neurotechnologies [will] enable users to interact with their environment and other people by thought alone’ – Quantumrun
  32. 32. ‘There will be underwater hotels and tourist attractions’ – Ian Pearson
  33. 33. ‘[There will be] people reincarnation through AI’ – Apiumhub
  34. 34. ‘[There will be] major advances in air travel comfort’ – Airbus
  35. 35. The 2050 Study • 1,267 students • 109 universities represented • Online questionnaire • Conducted 15th to 18th of September 2018 • No significant differences when cut by gender, ethnicity or social profile
  36. 36. Which sectors won’t exist by 2050? Retail 22.2% Banking 9.8% Accounting 7.1% Public 5.8% Media 4.9%
  37. 37. In their actual words ‘As a woman, I hope that the current movement on gender equality comes to a head where I will be paid the same as my male colleagues and also that it will be a more inclusive environment for all.’
  38. 38. In their actual words ‘Environmental problems cause the nonrenewable industries to shut down and be replaced by renewable resources. The transportation industry goes green. Big businesses work together to stop caring so much about capitalism and start reducing the resources they waste. Brenda in accounting has a cool new chip in her brain that lets her turn the coffee on in advance, but it's buggy and she usually turns the office lights on and off instead.’
  39. 39. In their actual words ‘Jobs which have previously had stereotypical gender roles pinned onto them (careers in science and engineering for example) will be changed due to encouragement and normalisation in schools.’
  40. 40. In their actual words ‘Hopefully working will become something people will do because of their interests and passions rather than as a means to survive.’
  41. 41. In their actual words ‘I believe that VR/AR will be used therapeutically allowing workers to turn their working environment into one that best suits them for instance, they could view their desk as if they were working in the middle of a forest with a calming river or by the sea with a sky that changes from sunrise to sunset as the day progresses to show their working hours as well as a starry night for those working nightshifts.’
  42. 42. In their actual words ‘A.I. will be used to replace tiresome tasks and data gathering. This will assist job roles where decision making is important factor, however, it will make quite a lot of people redundant.’
  43. 43. In their actual words ‘What other innovations do I expect to see in the office by 2050? Better coffee.’
  44. 44. Ideas to take home with you • Students are interested in AI, but many are as engaged with workplace equality, the pay gap and environmental sustainability • They are worried that, sooner or later, they will be replaced by robots • They are anticipating career change, so should be interested by continuous learning and personal transformation possibilities • Employers in retail, banking and accounting should try to convince prospects of the sustainability of their sectors
  45. 45. Thank you Andrew Baird Director of Consulting, Blackbridge Communications
  46. 46. The Rise of the Zombie Jobs: machines, robots and the future of work Dr Paul Redmond, Director of Student Experience and Enhancement, University of Liverpool
  47. 47. Daily Mail, 23.05.18
  48. 48. ‘Future Shock’ Alvin Toffler, 1970
  49. 49. ‘Too much change in too short a time.’ Alvin Toffler, 1970
  50. 50. Rate of Change RateofChange Time Technology Human Adaptability We are here Source: Friedman, 20162007
  51. 51. 2007: Apple iPhone 2007: Google + YouTube 2007: Facebook 2007: Twitter 2007: Google Android 2007: Amazon Kindle 2007: Airbnb 2007: IBM Watson 2007: PlayStation 3.
  52. 52. ‘A child’s PlayStation today is more powerful than a military supercomputer of 1996.’ Erik Brynjolfsson, MIT
  53. 53. ‘Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral.’ Prof.MelvinKranzberg,‘TechnologyandSociety’(1985)
  54. 54. Three challenges 1. ‘Technology is making reality less interesting than the story told about it later. 2. Technology is hollowing-out millions of white-collar jobs.
  55. 55. Three challenges 1. ‘Reality’’ is becoming less interesting than the story told about it later. 2. Technology is rapidly hollowing-out millions of white-collar jobs. 3. For organisations, success is neither dependent on, nor synonymous with, large workforces.
  56. 56. ‘A 2015 McKinsey report found that solely by using existing technologies, 45 percent of the work that human beings are paid to do could be automated, obviating the need to pay human employees more than $2 trillion in annual wages in the United States.’ Joseph E. Aoun, ‘Higher education in the age of Artificial Intelligence’ (2016)
  57. 57. ‘About35%of currentjobs in the UK are at high risk of computerisationoverthe following20 years,accordingto a studyby researchersat OxfordUniversityand Deloitte.’ 'The Future of Employment: How susceptible are jobs to automation’ Michael Osborne & Carl Frey, Martin School, Oxford University (2015).
  58. 58. 10. Careers Adviser 22% risk of automation
  59. 59. 9. Marketing Professional 37% risk of automation
  60. 60. 8. Writer / Translator 37% risk of automation
  61. 61. 7. Archivist / Curator 37% risk of automation
  62. 62. 6. Financial Analyst 40% risk of automation
  63. 63. 5. Librarian 54% risk of automation
  64. 64. 4. IT Engineer 60% risk of automation
  65. 65. 3. Surveyor 64% risk of automation
  66. 66. 2. Laboratory Technician 70% risk of automation
  67. 67. 1. Accountant 97% risk of automation
  68. 68. Three challenges 1. ‘Reality’’ is becoming less interesting than the story told about it later. 2. Technology is rapidly hollowing-out millions of white-collar jobs. 3. For organisations, success is neither dependent on nor synonymous with large workforces.
  69. 69. The New Logic: Scale w/o Employment Kodak: 1988/145,000 employees; 2012/bankrupt Instagram: 30,000,000 customers/ 13 employees (WhatsApp: 450,000,000 customers/ 55 employees/ Valued @ $19,000,000,000) Source: Robert Reich’s Blog/0316.15
  70. 70. SUMMARY: ZOMBIE-PROOF CAREERS?
  71. 71. Future Jobs (University of Oxford, 2016) • Virtual Habitat Designer • Ethical Technology Advocate • Digital Cultural Commentator • Freelance Bio-hacker • Internet of things data creative • Space tour guide • Personal content curator • Re-wilding strategist • Sustainable Power Innovator • Human Body Designer
  72. 72. 3 Questions 1. Does the job require interacting with people and using social intelligence? 2. Does it involve creativity and coming up with clever solutions? 3. Does it require working in an unpredictable environment?
  73. 73. ‘Nothing is so painful to the human mind than a great and sudden change.’ MaryShelley,Frankenstein
  74. 74. Thank you Dr Paul Redmond, Director of Student Experience and Enhancement, University of Liverpool
  75. 75. Are they prepared? Rt. Hon Nicky Morgan MP, Former Secretary of State for Education & MP for Loughborough
  76. 76. Thank you Rt. Hon Nicky Morgan MP, Former Secretary of State for Education & MP for Loughborough
  77. 77. Next event 5 December

×