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Session7 03 Katharina Raab & Ralf Wagner

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Presentation made at the Sustainable Tourism in Small Island Developing States conference, 23-24 November 2017, Seychelles. A partnership of the Seychelles Sustainable Tourism Foundation, IUCN WCPA Tourism and Protected Areas Specialist Group, University of Seychelles, Paris Tourism Sorbonne (IREST), and Global Sustainable Tourism Council.

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Session7 03 Katharina Raab & Ralf Wagner

  1. 1. K A T H A R I N A R A A B – PhD Candidate email: raab.katharina@gmail.com Prof. Dr. R A L F W A G N E R – Marketing email: rwagner@wirtschaft.uni-kassel.de Green-Tourism for Small Island Developing States
  2. 2. Almost all developing and emerging countries face one big problem: Situation is Worsening: increase in income -> increase in consumption, improving living conditions, industrialization, product packaging, etc. Negative Consequences: pollution of the oceans, streets, air, groundwater, human health, etc. W A S T E !
  3. 3. Amount of Waste is Increasing World Wide Small Islands States (SIS) Waste Production per capita Trinidad and Tobago 14.40 kg/capita/day Antigua and Barbuda 5.50 kg/capita/day Sri Lanka 5.10 kg/capita/day Barbados 4.75 kg/capita/day St Lucia 4.35 kg/capita/day Seychelles 2.50 kg/capita/day Mauritius 1.01 kg/capita/day Source: World Economic Forum 2015 12 times the world average of 1.2 kg. (Germany 1.7kg)
  4. 4. What do We Know? • unclear allocation of responsibilities • lack of financial flexibility • unspecific policy • low engagement in new technologies & suppliers for waste sorting • government implement waste management goals in its policies and plans + - Country • waste production per capita per day is too high • landfilling quotes increasing every year -> risk of saturation of landfilling • recycling quotes are too low & no circular economy • little natural resources • Seychelles Sustainable Tourism Label • recycling of PET bottles, glass, cans and paper Government People • consumers demonstrate a willingness to recycle • peoples purchase decisions: quality over price • recognizing the waste problem • buying cheap, disposable goods • mixed environmental awareness • unpredictable disposal behavior
  5. 5. Homepage Link: http://www.wasteproject.de
  6. 6. Case Studies - Mauritius Positivism Bias NGO - Recycling & Sustainable Environment
  7. 7. Positive Examples - Mauritius A Corporate Social Responsibility Project of the Rogers Group Plankton currently recycles 400 tons per year and expect to increase this to 6000 tons which will represent 50% of total glass waste and 2% of total waste in Mauritius. Uses of Recycled Glass: From To
  8. 8. Positive Examples - Mauritius 1. Waste from food processing is collected Transfer to “Kitchen Garden” 2. Fruits and vegetable waste Process to compost 3. Compost is used for planting of vegetables Replaces chemical fertilizers 4. Rain water collection and storage for watering the “Kitchen Garden” 5. Fresh herbs fruits and vegetable from “Kitchen Garden” to production
  9. 9. Positive Examples - Mauritius Facts Outlined by Ahrim • Waste collection, sorting and recycling is not properly supported & lack of existing policy • Waste management is a business, requiring organization • Tourism produces less than 3% of total solid waste • No programs for households’ motivation for waste sorting and disposal • National policies and actions are necessary - taxation of payment for national services have lost meaning but are important for e.g. concerning public health with respect to solid waste management For a Sustainable Tourism Industry Ideas for the Hotel Industry • Labels: Eco-Tourism / Eco-Lodging / Eco-Labelling or Eco-Classification • Green labelling for the hotel industry (almost 50% do high level of waste sorting, about 20% were not engaged in any form of waste sorting) • Handbook and national programs for waste management & energy efficiency guidelines
  10. 10. International Air Transport AssociationCase Studies - Mauritius Aircraft Cabin Waste • Lack of Cabin Waste Recycling • As per IATA , average passenger generates 1.4 kg of waste per flight • 4.9 million tons of cabin waste in 2016 • Waste bill of $790 million • With the pax growth, double in the next 10 years Food Waste • IATA research also indicates that over 20% of cabin waste comprises of untouched/unconsumed food and beverages • Food waste is recognized as a major environmental challenge • UNEP estimation – 1/3 of food produced in the world gets lost or wasted Airline Cabin Waste Assessment • Lack of standard waste monitoring protocols • Low awareness of appropriate waste management treatment options- recycling & disposal • No incentive for Service partner contracts to minimize and recycling • Low recycling participation rates (crew awareness/motivation) Way Forward • Develop a holistic approach to cabin waste management including waste minimization; recovery/reuse; donation; recycling and alternative waste disposal options • Vision of the airline industry is aiming at a ZERO Waste Flight to support the planet earth
  11. 11. Community Involvement for Green Tourism Managers Employees Guests Improvement for Waste Collection Need for new Processes & Business Models Interaction / Synergy of all participants is necessary Example of Plankton Glass Recycling - Mauritius Plankton: First process was manual – insanity. Pyrolysis-based waste processing plant transforming recyclable materials to energy, gas and fluids (BTX) at the same time. Innovative Infrastructure and Technology Plankton education for disadvantaged individuals living in Mauritius Conclusion
  12. 12. http://www.mu.undp.org/content/mauritius_and_seychelles/en/home/operations/funding_ delivery.html Funding Opportunities Homepage Link: http://www.wasteproject.de

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