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Educational Publishing in Your Discipline
Phil	
  Wankat	
  
	
  
Dis-nguished	
  Professor	
  Purdue	
  Univ.	
  
Editor	...
Why publish in disciplinary education journals?
Altruis-c	
  Reasons	
  
1.  Help	
  improve	
  educa-on	
  in	
  your	
  ...
Why should you listen to me?
Editor, Textbook author, Author book for hire
	
  	
  
Examples: Disciplinary Educational Journals
•  CEE,	
  Educ.	
  for	
  Chemical	
  Engineers	
  	
  
•  	
  J.	
  Chemical...
Where you publish can be important. Research
tier 1 or 2; Sub-discipline, Electronic-only
journal; Conference Proceedings,...
Journal Differences
•  Sub-­‐discipline	
  journals:	
  Tend	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  technically	
  oriented.	
  
–  Includ...
Educational Proceedings
•  The	
  most	
  frequent	
  place	
  engineering	
  faculty	
  publish	
  are	
  in	
  
conferen...
Do Educational Publications Count for P&T?
•  Maybe	
  
•  At	
  Research	
  1	
  Universi-es,	
  will	
  not	
  count	
  ...
Do Educational Pubs help sell textbooks?
•  Absolutely!	
  
•  I	
  am	
  invited	
  to	
  ins-tu-ons	
  based	
  on	
  ed...
Writing Education Papers – 1
	
  	
  	
  	
  Research	
  grants,	
  graduate	
  researchers,	
  and	
  teaching	
  -me	
  ...
Writing Education Papers – 2
4.  Outline.	
  	
  A	
  generic	
  outline	
  can	
  be	
  good	
  star-ng	
  point.	
  
–  ...
Writing Education Papers – 3
8.  Submit	
  	
  
–  Follow	
  the	
  journals	
  rules.	
  Submission	
  is	
  usually	
  e...
11. Response from the Journal
•  Editors	
  pay	
  a^en-on	
  to	
  reviews,	
  but	
  the	
  editor	
  	
  decides.	
  
•...
12. Responding to Reviews
•  Occasionally,	
  all	
  reviewers	
  of	
  a	
  paper	
  accept	
  without	
  changes.	
  
– ...
What editors (or at least this editor) want
•  A	
  sincere	
  effort	
  to	
  improve	
  the	
  paper.	
  
–  If	
  the	
 ...
Teaching books in your discipline
	
  The	
  1st	
  edi-on	
  of	
  Teaching	
  Engineering	
  survived	
  for	
  22	
  ye...
Questions
Preview of Optional Workshop
•  Many	
  professors	
  think	
  that	
  publishing	
  educa-onal	
  papers	
  is	
  
quite	...
 B	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  R	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  E	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  A	
  
	...
WORKSHOP
1.  Decide	
  on	
  a	
  tenta-ve	
  topic	
  for	
  a	
  paper	
  
–  New	
  curriculum	
  or	
  new	
  course	
...
WORKSHOP - 2
5.  AQer	
  iden-fying	
  a	
  topic	
  and	
  target	
  journal,	
  outline	
  the	
  paper.	
  
6.  The	
  ...
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Educational Publishing in Your Discipline

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Textbook and journal authors usually learn useful fundamental approaches and tricks about teaching their subject. Sharing these ideas and becoming known as an educational expert in addition to being a subject material expert will increase their reputation as a scholarly teacher and may help with promotion and tenure. In addition, writing disciplinary education articles can help textbook authors increase adoptions and sales. Learn a step-by-step procedure for developing, writing and publishing a disciplinary education paper, including methods for negotiating the hazards of the peer review process.

@ Copyright 2015 Phil Wankat

Published in: Education
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Educational Publishing in Your Discipline

  1. 1. Educational Publishing in Your Discipline Phil  Wankat     Dis-nguished  Professor  Purdue  Univ.   Editor  Chemical  Engineering  Educa0on     TAA  Conference,  Las  Vegas,  June  20,  2015  
  2. 2. Why publish in disciplinary education journals? Altruis-c  Reasons   1.  Help  improve  educa-on  in  your  discipline   2.  Want  to  share  effec-ve  teaching  methods  you  have  learned   3.  Well  help  focus  your  teaching  improvement  efforts.   Career  Reasons   1.  Helps  integrate  your  teaching  and  scholarship  and  can  give   you  a  campus  reputa-on  as  a  scholarly  teacher   2.  May  help  with  promo-on  &  tenure  (P&T)   3.  OQen  easier  to  earn  reputa-on  in  educa-on  than  in  research   4.  Textbook  authors:  Reputa-on  as  both  an  educa-onal  expert   &  a  content  expert  can  increase  adop-ons  &  sales.   5.  Educa-onal  publishing,  including  textbooks,  was  the    difference  that  made  me  a  dis-nguished  professor.  
  3. 3. Why should you listen to me? Editor, Textbook author, Author book for hire    
  4. 4. Examples: Disciplinary Educational Journals •  CEE,  Educ.  for  Chemical  Engineers     •   J.  Chemical  Educa-on,  Educ.  in  Chemistry,  Physics  Educ.,  J.   Biological  Educ.,  Research  in  Science  Educ.,  J.  Geosience  Educ.,   Astronomy  Ed.  Review   •  J.  Engineering  Educ.  (JEE),  Prism,  European  J.  Engr.  Educ.  (EJEE),   Intl  J.  Engr.  Educ  (IJEE),IEEE  Transac-ons  Educ.  (IEEE  Trans),   Technology  &  Engr.  Teacher  (TET),  Advances  Engr.  Educ.   •  American  J.  Health  Educ.,  Medical  Educ.,  Nurse  Educ.  Today,   Nurse  Educ.  in  Prac-ce,  Pharmacy  Educ.,  Optometric  Educ.,     •  Art  Educ.,  English  Educ.,  English  Educ.,  History  Educ.,  History   Teacher,  J.  Poli-cal  Science  Educ.,  Intl.  J.  Social  Educ.   •  College  Teaching  –  all  disciplines.  Academe  –  AAUP  -­‐  issues   •  Teaching  Journals  Directory:           h^p://cetl.kennesaw.edu/teaching-­‐journals-­‐directory  
  5. 5. Where you publish can be important. Research tier 1 or 2; Sub-discipline, Electronic-only journal; Conference Proceedings, Magazine    
  6. 6. Journal Differences •  Sub-­‐discipline  journals:  Tend  to  be  more  technically  oriented.   –  Include  course  &  curriculum  development   –  Authoring  a  paper  does  not  require  special  educa-onal  research  tools   •  Electronic  only  journals:  OQen  thought  of  as  lower  quality,   but  may  not  be.   –  Unfortunately,  there  have  been  a  number  of  predatory  journals  that  are   electronic  only.  The  journals  I  list  are  not  in  this  category.   •  Magazines:  Prism  is  the  ASEE  magazine.  It  is  not  peer   reviewed  and  mostly  contains  ar-cles  by  professional  writers.     Since  all  ASEE  members  +  members  of  congress  &  other   opinion  leaders  receive  a  copy,  it  is  widely  read.   –  For  8  years  I  co-­‐authored  a  column  in  Prism  on  Teaching.    Despite  being   limited  to  one  page  and  no  cita-ons,  it  was  fairly  widely  cited  and  reproduced.     I  was  invited  because  Prism  editors  thought  I  would  deliver  columns  on  -me.   –  Not  peer  reviewed,  would  not  count  for  P&T,  but  many  more  readers  than  a   typical  research  paper.  Definitely  helped  my  name  recogni-on.    
  7. 7. Educational Proceedings •  The  most  frequent  place  engineering  faculty  publish  are  in   conference  proceedings:   –  Proceedings  ASEE  Annual  Conference  1300  –  1400  papers.   –  Proceedings  Fron0ers  in  Educa0on  Conference  (IEEE  &  ASEE)  ~150  papers.   –  Peer  reviewed,  but  erra0cally.   –  Both  conferences  are  publish  to  present,  but  paper  quality  varies  widely.   –  All  papers  are  now  available  free  on  the  web.   •  Contrast  this  with  the    ~30  papers  per  year  in  JEE.   –  Very  extensive  peer  review   •  Proceedings  papers  cited  much  less  oQen  than  JEE  papers.   •  Proceedings  papers  tend  to  be  dismissed  during  P&T.   •  An  Aside  on  Books:  Textbooks  and  engineering  educa-on   books  are  extensively  cited,  but  not  included  in  SCI  or  Scopus.  
  8. 8. Do Educational Publications Count for P&T? •  Maybe   •  At  Research  1  Universi-es,  will  not  count  much  for  promo-on   to  Associate  Professor,  but  may  be  helpful  at  margin.   –  Professors  hired  to  do  disciplinary  educa-on  research  are  excep-on.   •  At  UG  ins-tu-ons,  will  bolster  teaching  side  for  all   promo-ons.   •  At  Research  1  Universi-es  an  argument  can  be  made  for   promo-on  to  full  or  dis-nguished  professor  based  on   educa-onal  publica-ons  –  and  –  amazingly,  textbooks  count!   –  Need  proof  of  external  impact  such  as  adop-ons.   •  If  a  professor  has  good  teaching  ra-ngs,  educa-onal   publica-ons  can  help  one  receive  teaching  awards.  
  9. 9. Do Educational Pubs help sell textbooks? •  Absolutely!   •  I  am  invited  to  ins-tu-ons  based  on  educa-onal  publica-ons.   –  Every  visit  is  a  chance  to  talk  about  textbooks.   –  Professors  are  oQen  5  to  10  years  behind  on  what  is  in  my  text.   •  Other  textbook  authors  (in  different  areas)  are  told  to  look  at   how  I  approach  example  problems.  This  can  lead  to  adop-ons   since  I  am  not  compe--on.   •  If  the  word  gets  out  that  students  like  and  learn  from  your   textbook,  you  are  half  way  to  an  adop-on.     –  S-ll  need  to  have  content  the  professors  want.   •  Doing  the  study  and  research  for  educa-onal  publica-ons  will   improve  your  textbooks  if  you  follow  good  educa-onal   prac-ces.    
  10. 10. Writing Education Papers – 1        Research  grants,  graduate  researchers,  and  teaching  -me  off   are  useful,  but  are  not  needed  –  do  a  project  to  improve  your   regular  teaching.  Then  write  about  that.   1.  Have  something  worth  saying.   –  New  curriculum  or  new  course   –  New  teaching  method.   –  Thorough  pedagogical  literature  review.   –  Reduced  D,  F,  and  withdrawals  in  core  course.   –  Well  thought-­‐out  opinion  piece.   2.  Study  recent  issues  educa-onal  journals  &  find  two  targets.   –  Ed  journals  have  become  more  scholarly  and  older  papers  may  not  be   representa-ve  of  what  is  published  now.   3.  Actually  read  the  journal’s  guide  for  authors.       –  Most  authors  do  not.  
  11. 11. Writing Education Papers – 2 4.  Outline.    A  generic  outline  can  be  good  star-ng  point.   –  Introduc-on   –  Literature  review  with  both  subject  and  pedagogical  references   –  Describe  course,  curriculum,  research,  etc.  with  emphasis  on  novelty   –  Best  evidence:  improved  student  learning,  student  ajtude  surveys  common   –  Discussion  and  further  improvements   5.  If  your  paper  will  involve  student  data,  file  for  an  exemp=on   with  Ins=tu=onal  Review  Board  (IRB)  before  collec=ng  data.   6.  Write.       –  Get  something  down  on  paper.    Then  you  can  move  on.   7.  Edit  and  revise.       –  Proofread  and  spell  check.  Educa-onal  publica-ons  are  budget  opera-ons   and  cannot  afford  to  provide  editorial  services.     –  Pull  out  the  guidelines  for  authors  and  make  sure  they  are  followed.   –  Ask  a  colleague  to  read  and  comment.   –  Polish.  Editors  dislike  receiving  rough  draQs.  
  12. 12. Writing Education Papers – 3 8.  Submit     –  Follow  the  journals  rules.  Submission  is  usually  electronic.  Grit  your  teeth   and  do  it.   9.  Although  few  authors  see  it  this  way,  editors  who  send  the   paper  back  with  a  request  for  polishing,  changes,  or   addi-ons  before  sending  it  out  for  review  are  doing  you  a   favor.     10. Follow  the  editor’s  advice.  You  want  the  editor  on  your  side.   Revise  and  send  paper  in  again.   –  If  the  editor  states  the  paper  is  not  suitable  for  this  journal,  try  another.   11.         Wait    
  13. 13. 11. Response from the Journal •  Editors  pay  a^en-on  to  reviews,  but  the  editor    decides.   •  Read  editor’s  le^er  and  reviews  quickly  to  get  a  general  idea.   Then  read  the  le^er  very  carefully   –  A  le^er  that  states,  “once  we  have  received  an  acceptable  version,  we  will  be   pleased  to  publish  your  paper”  or  something  similar  is  very  posi-ve.     –  A  le^er  sta-ng  that  revisions  are  requested  and  implies  there  may  be  another   review  is  also  posi-ve  since  the  editor  is  asking  you  to  work  with  him  or  her  to   eventually  obtain  an  acceptable  version.   –  A  rejec-on  with  encouragement  to  totally  rewrite  and  then  resubmit  is  not   posi-ve,  but  there  is  hope  since  the  editor  saw  some  worthwhile  parts.   –  An  outright  rejec-on  with  no  encouragement  to  resubmit  means  you  go  to   your  second  choice  journal;  however,  use  the  reviews  to  improve  the  paper   before  submijng  again  –  the  same  reviewer  may  receive  the  paper.     •  If  result  is  a  rejec-on,  it  is  healthy  to  vent  –  privately.   –   Write  in  Word,  NOT  e-­‐mail,  a  le^er  sta-ng  what  you  think  of  the  reviewers.   Do  not  send  it.   –  AQer  an  hour  or  two,  it  is  -me  to  get  back  to  work.  
  14. 14. 12. Responding to Reviews •  Occasionally,  all  reviewers  of  a  paper  accept  without  changes.   –  Twice  in  twenty  years  of  edi-ng.   •  Reviewers  comments  can  be:     –  insighrul  or  dead  wrong,     –  self-­‐serving  (cite  my  publica-ons)   –  complimentary  or  nasty   –  comment  on  English  only  (oQen  useful)   –  suggest  a  lot  more  work  (if  they  are  correct,  but  you  do  not  want  to  do  the   work,  the  argument  that  this  would  greatly  lengthen  the  paper  oQen  works)   –  contradict  other  reviews.   •  To  deal  with  this  variety   –  Listen  to  the  editor.  If  the  editor  says  pay  a^en-on  to  part  of  a  review  –  do  it.   –  If  the  reviewers  are  correct,  make  the  changes.   –  If  a  reviewer  claims  a  sentence  or  paragraph  is  hard  to  understand,  it  is.  Revise   –  If  a  reviewer  is  wrong,  explain  respecrully  why  the  comment  is  wrong   –  Contradictory  reviews  are  oQen  a  good  argument  for  not  changing  a  sec-on.  
  15. 15. What editors (or at least this editor) want •  A  sincere  effort  to  improve  the  paper.   –  If  the  author  makes  75-­‐80%  of  the  suggested  changes  (including  trivial   typographical  errors  and  including  any  that  I  explicitly  asked  for)  I  will  usually   accept  the  paper.   •  Authors  who  will  work  with  me  to  improve  the  paper.   •  Common  courtesy   –  Politely  asking  about  the  progress  of  your  paper  is  certainly  OK,  and  can  help   the  journal  catch  papers  that  have  slid  from  view.   –  Cursing  and  harassing  the  managing  editor  and/or  the  editor  via  e-­‐mail  or   phone  will  not  get  your  paper  and  any  subsequent  papers  published.   •  Honesty   –  If  the  paper  was  presented  at  a  conference,  state  this  in  acknowledgments.   –  If  a  conference  paper  was  published,  cite  that  paper.   –  CEE  requires  that  conference  publica-ons  be  enhanced  with  approximately  a   third  of  the  paper  being  new  material.   –  Do  not  cite  your  own  papers  if  you  would  not  cite  an  equivalent  paper  from      another  author.  
  16. 16. Teaching books in your discipline  The  1st  edi-on  of  Teaching  Engineering  survived  for  22  years  –   the  last  18  as  free  on  the  web.    I  did   not  make  money,  but  I  earned  a  lot    of  good  will,  cita-ons,  and  renown.     Teaching  Engineering  is  the  most     adopted  book  in  this  area  (there  is   only  1  other  book).  Student  e-­‐book   Version  of  2nd  edi-on  is  available     through  Skyepack  for  $10.   Consider  wri-ng  a  teaching  book    for  your  discipline.  
  17. 17. Questions
  18. 18. Preview of Optional Workshop •  Many  professors  think  that  publishing  educa-onal  papers  is   quite  different  than  publishing  disciplinary  research.   •  This  is  true  –  in  most  disciplines  it  is  easier  to  publish   educa-onal  papers.  Only  hard  part  can  be  obtaining  IRB   approval  –  and  that  is  usually  only  needed  for  rigorous   research.  Classroom  research  usually  rates  an  exemp-on.   •  The  goal  of  the  workshop  is  to  get  a^endees  started  on  a   project  to  publish  an  educa-onal  paper,  provide  personal   a^en-on,  &  develop  enough  momentum  that  you  will  finish.   •  I  am  also  happy  to  discuss  wri-ng  a  book  on  teaching.   •  AQer  a  short  break,  we  will  do  the  short  workshop  por-on.   •  Note:  workshop  will  not  run  over  as  I  have  a  2:25  flight.  
  19. 19.  B          R                  E                          A                                    K   •   5  minutes  
  20. 20. WORKSHOP 1.  Decide  on  a  tenta-ve  topic  for  a  paper   –  New  curriculum  or  new  course   –  New  teaching  method.   –  Thorough  literature  review.   –  Reduced  D,  F,  and  withdrawals  in  core  course.   –  Well  thought-­‐out  opinion  piece   –  What  ever   2.  Iden-fy  a  target  journal  and  a  backup.    If  no  idea,  go  to   h^p://cetl.kennesaw.edu/teaching-­‐journals-­‐directory   3.  Study  the  target  journal’s  web  page  &  sample  issue.  If  the   journal  fits  your  tenta-ve  paper,  proceed   4.  Read  the  journal’s  instruc-ons  to  authors.    
  21. 21. WORKSHOP - 2 5.  AQer  iden-fying  a  topic  and  target  journal,  outline  the  paper.   6.  The  outline  will  focus  you  on  what  addi-onal  work  needs  to   be  done.   –  Introduc-on  –  you  can  probably  write  this  now.   –  Literature  review  with  both  subject  and  pedagogical  references  –  you   probably  need  to  do  a  review  of  pedagogical  references.   –  Describe  course,  curriculum,  research,  etc.  with  emphasis  on  novelty  –  may   need  your  pedagogical  literature  review  to  see  what  is  novel.   –  For  papers  about  course  or  curriculum  improvements,  evidence  of  student   learning  is  best,  but  if  not  available  survey  student  ajtudes  –  for  this  type  of   paper  probably  need  to  collect  some  student  data.  Before  star=ng  data   collec=on  file  for  an  exemp=on  with  your  local  IRB.   –  Discussion  and  further  improvements  –  although  early,  good  -me  to  think   about  the  significance  of  your  results  and  what  next.   7.  Devise  a  work  plan  to  do  what  needs  to  be  done.  

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