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Suzie Rose
IT 6710
March 20, 2010
Captivate Job Aid Design Documentation
Overview
Adobe Captivate 4.0 is an exciting progr...
Some existing issues that I plan to improve include the following:
• Remove the tutorial aspect of the job aid so the cont...
Audience
My primary audience includes anyone interested in learning the basic components of Captivate –
all ages, backgrou...
Learning Objectives
• View Captivate as a fun and exciting software application.
• Identify Captivate’s functions so users...
Evidence
• To provide an effective tour and overview of Captivate so a novice user can become
familiar with the atmosphere...
Sequencing
Decision #1 - Comic style precedes mapped annotated picture diagram
This helped me set a story and grab the att...
Decision #3 – Use of white space
Use of white space is exceptionally important in this format due to the dense amount of d...
Layout
Decision #1 –Reading flow left-to-right, up-to-down
Due to the large amount of content I include in a small amount ...
Peer Review Results
1. Is my general placement effective? List two ways to improve it.
Reviewer 1:
• I thought the general...
• It comes to mind that a company might uses template, does yours do that? Would it be
good to encourage that when teachin...
3. I’m concerned about the font. The pages have two fonts, a title font and Arial for the
text boxes. Is Arial too simple?...
• Representation showing changes over time. – Sorry, Suzie, I am completely stumped
with this one. I’m not sure how you co...
5. Please list the three weakest aspects of my job aid and a suggestion about how to fix it.
Reviewer 1:
• Layouts: The pi...
Bibliography
Abela, A. (2008). Advanced Presentations by Design: Creating Great Presentations. San
Francisco: Pffeiffer.
C...
Appendix A - Abela Worksheets
Worksheet A.1a. Audience Personality Type
Audience Personality Type
Anyone interested in lea...
Captivate is a highly intriguing program, which offers robust and easy-to-use features. Users can
create flash-based files...
Worksheet A.4. Spectrum of Solution Contributions
This job aid introduces new users to the Captivate interface. It provide...
Worksheet A.6. List of Evidence
Evidence:
• Visuals of the sections of Captivate beginners need
• How to navigate to the a...
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Job Aid Makeover - Design Document

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Job Aid Makeover - Design Document

  1. 1. Suzie Rose IT 6710 March 20, 2010 Captivate Job Aid Design Documentation Overview Adobe Captivate 4.0 is an exciting program that helps users create flash-based files without learning Flash or html code. These files include self-running presentations, software demonstrations and simulations, quizzes, slideshows, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts. People can view the final published product online, in eLearning presentations, through learning management systems, or in offline browser windows. This comprehensive list shows that Captivate can be a vital asset to many people inside and outside the professional world. However, new users are often intimidated by Captivate. They’re likely to assume that due to the application’s many purposes and it’s close association with Flash, it is challenging and hard to learn. This job aid works to restructure that mode of thinking and show readers that Captivate is fun and easy. It guides readers through basic navigation and components of Captivate with no assumptions of previous knowledge. It is presented in a combination of a comic style and dense data style to capture both a sense of whimsy to intrigue readers and a sense of structure to inform them. My goal is to introduce readers to Captivate with colorful, vibrant, and attention-grabbing visuals, while imparting knowledge to an individual reader without facilitation of a presenter or trainer (Abela, 2008, p.92). Although readers can utilize this guide in any environment, I’ve made the assumption that most will be in a professional environment. Since time is vital in this environment, the scope of this job aid is relatively high-level and is focused towards a new or inexperienced user. It focuses on aspects users are likely to need as they get started, but it does not delve into the details of each option and function available in Captivate. The original job aid I’ve “made over” contains a plethora of information, however it’s not structured in a constructive manner. The objectives do not currently match the lesson, and the directions serve more as a tutorial than as a job aid. Many steps are too strictly defined. For example, it directs the reader to select a specific screen resolution and window size. This may be sufficient for a tutorial, but these factors differ depending on each project. My job aid takes that into account and focuses more on the process of completing tasks.
  2. 2. Some existing issues that I plan to improve include the following: • Remove the tutorial aspect of the job aid so the content is more universal and can be used in larger contexts. • Tutorials tend to encourage learners to follow directives without clear direction explaining why they are doing so. This results in a situation where learners are unable to transfer the information to other contexts. • I plan to restructure the content so it flows in a more constructive manner: o Introduction and definition of Captivate o Navigational and functional explanation of Captivate’s: Opening menu Two most commonly used views Objects toolbar Timeline Slide properties Recording Quizzes Previewing and Publishing Original Job Aid: http://pdfoxy.com/15860-use-adobe-captivate-to-create-tutorials-that-grab-attention--pdf.html http://www.txdla.org/conference/2008/program/presenterresources/348_Captivate_Me_Handout.pdf
  3. 3. Audience My primary audience includes anyone interested in learning the basic components of Captivate – all ages, backgrounds, education levels, etc. Therefore, the communication preferences of these individuals span all audience personality implications. As Andrew Abela states in his book, Advanced Presentations by Design, in cases that include many personality types, I must, “design [my] presentation to appeal to all the types that could be present” (2008, p.21). Abela recommends the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to determine personality types of audiences. Since administering an MBTI test is not feasible in my case, he suggests an informal assessment to estimate possible different personality types or combinations of personality types (2008, p.20). Please refer to the below chart to view methods and techniques applied in the job aid to accomplish this. Personality Type Typical Need How to meet typical needs Examples from the Captivate Job Aid Introvert Time to reflect on information Provide information in advance Distribution techniques may vary, but I plan to post the job aid to a SharePoint cite so users can access it at all times. Extrovert Interactive discussion Plan for lots of discussion / Q&A I use a conversational interaction through charatcers to simulate an interactive experience (p.2-3, 7, 18). I also refer users to tutorial and resources that include message and discussion boards (p.3). Sensor The facts and all the details Include all relevant facts and details I present relevant facts and details (as applicable) in all aspects of the job aid (p.3-20). Intuitor The big picture Provide an overview up-front The characters exemplify the big picture as they discuss a problem that Captivate can solve (p.2). Additionally, one character states the big picture on page 3 when she explains the purpose and value of Captivate. Thinker Principles involved, costs, benefits Identify principles, costs, and benefits The principles and benefits are implied throughout the conversation on pages 2-3 when the characters explain the functions of Captivate that will solve the problem. Feeler To whom it is valuable State implication for the audience The conversation on pages 2-3 shows two employees who create presentations. This implies that it will benefit professional workers, but also mentions other functions (p.3) such as eLearning, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts that could apply to both professional and recreational users. Judger Conclusions Present conclusions up-front The conclusion is presented on pages 2-3 when the characters explain that Captivate can help create a highly interactive, engaging self-running presentation with software simulations and a quiz. Perceiver Alternatives List all alternatives considered Page 21 shows a before and after representation of the character’s work. This illustrates an alternative application and methods in comparison to Captivate.
  4. 4. Learning Objectives • View Captivate as a fun and exciting software application. • Identify Captivate’s functions so users can make educated decisions about which application to use for a given project. • Design and develop creative training materials, presentations, etc. that employ engaging animations, interactions, and assessments. Problem / Solution The audience’s problem is simply that they do not know how to use Captivate. They do not have an application that lets them create self-running presentations, software demonstrations and simulations, quizzes, slideshows, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts quickly and easily. As a result, their presentations or eLearning courses may become mundane electronic page- turners. These types of presentations do not achieve their goal. In the case of eLearning, the goal is to build new knowledge or skills using content that is relevant to learning objectives, instructional methods such as examples and practice, and media elements (Clark, 2003). Even when possible, the media is not often dynamic and engaging. But why is dynamic content important? Today’s learners are enveloped in electronic environments through the Internet, TV, and video games. Their expectations for entertainment have grown, and in turn, their expectations for all forms of media have grown. Dynamic presentations and eLearning courses engage and motivate learners. Many members of my audience may believe they have to learn Flash and html code to create dynamic and engaging content; these skills can be cumbersome, time-consuming, and difficult to learn. Captivate provides an alternative. It has a simple user interface that mirrors many applications users may already use, but it produces high-end Flash products complete with animations and interactions. This job aid introduces new users to the Captivate interface. It provides a tour that includes information they’re likely to need, but excludes extraneous or advanced skills and settings. It works to show that Captivate is fun and easy. It guides readers through basic navigation and features of Captivate with no assumptions that they’re familiar with other software applications.
  5. 5. Evidence • To provide an effective tour and overview of Captivate so a novice user can become familiar with the atmosphere and perform simple tasks, I must provide: o Visuals of the sections of Captivate beginners need o How to navigate to the aforementioned sections o The functions of relevant features o How to set preferences (slide, recording, quiz, project) o How to capture screen images o How to create Quiz slides o Previewing and publishing projects I adapted this information from Using Adobe Captivate 4 for Windows (Adobe, 2008). • To help readers view Captivate as fun and exciting, it’s important to include elements of comic style; this creates an amusing and entertaining air. Ideally, the fun readers experience through the comic characters will extend into their overall impression of Captivate. The characters introduce the content heavily on pages 2-3 and are freckled throughout most pages of the job aid to create a sense on continuity and narration. • To help readers identify Captivate’s capabilities, the job aid lists the final products Captivate can create (p.3). I adapted this information from Captivate 4 Essential Training - Introducing Captivate (Plumer, 2009). • To help readers make educated decisions about which application to use for a given project, the job aid lists the final products Captivate can create (p.3) ( Plumer, 2009). The comparison included on page 21 of the job aid also contributes to this goal. Anecdotes I enveloped the content about Captivate with an intriguing and relatable story involving characters Lori and Suzie. Lori signifies the learner, who is synonymous with the typical reader of this job aid. My goal of this story is to create a sense of place, time, and context, which are likely similar to the context my readers experience. In essence, these characters should “draw in” the readers. Format I chose to incorporate both comic style and dense data style. • Comic style helps me capture a sense of whimsy to intrigue readers, create an amusing and entertaining air, and positively influence readers’ overall impression of Captivate. • Dense data style helps me exude a necessary formality as I explain the crux of the content. It gives the content an appropriate authority of factual information.
  6. 6. Sequencing Decision #1 - Comic style precedes mapped annotated picture diagram This helped me set a story and grab the attention of my reader (p.2-3). As John Medina points out in his book, Brain Rules, “Better attention always equals better learning” (2008, p.74). The story in this job aid helps create meaningful communication about my topic. These characters have a problem that my audience cannot only relate to, but it may possibly trigger a memory that mirrors the story. Medina continues to explain, “What we pay attention to is profoundly influenced by memory” (2008, p.75). By tapping into this possible connection, I increase the probability of creating emotional appeal. Medina states, “The brain remembers the emotional components of an experience better than any other aspect” (2008, p.82). This also helped me, “…combine words and pictures to create effects that neither could create separately” as advocated by Scott McCloud (2006, p.4). Decision #2 - I built upon knowledge from easiest to most difficult As Adobe no doubt paid great attention to as they designed Captivate, a beginner can easily create seamless presentations by learning the basics of Captivate. They can use Captivate in the same way as any other presentation software. As my job aid continues, I add more difficult elements such as capturing screen images and creating quizzes (p. 13-16). I chose to flow with this natural sequence as I put together my job aid. I allowed my content to establish my flow as I followed Edwards Tufte’s advice, “What are the content-reasoning tasks that this display is supposed to help with? Answering this question will suggest choices for content elements, design architecture, and presentation technologies” (2006, p.136). My choices of moment represent the most efficient way to communicate information to my reader (McCloud, 2006, p.12). Decision #3 – Subject-to-subject The format of my job aid tends to follow the subject-to-subject choice of moment as outlined by Scott McCloud (2006, p.11-12, 14-15). Each window of Captivate can be thought of as a subject. As I switch from subject to subject, I’m creating a sequence of events that merge together to ultimately become a cohesive unit. The comic characters peppered throughout the job aid serve the purpose of illustrating aspects of my job aid and moving the story along (Abela, 2008, p.69). Graphics Decision #1 – Mapped annotated picture diagram I use a mapped annotated picture diagram because, “Visual reasoning usually works more effectively when the relevant evidence is shown adjacent in space within our eyespan” (Tufte, 2006, p.159). The goal of the job aid is to educate readers while exemplifying simplicity of design and complexity of detail (Abela, 2008, p.138). A diagram helps me achieve this goal wonderfully because it’s a good way to explain how parts of a whole interact (Duarte, 2008, p.44). Although this concept is present throughout the entirety of the job aid, my strongest examples are on pages 3-5, 10, 12, 14, and 17. Decision #2 – Compare-and-contrast representation I implement a compare-and-contrast representation to show the juxtaposition of slides created with and without Captivate. This illustrates the differences (Duarte, 2008, p.56) and therefore the benefits of Captivate as displayed in a final product. To help readers make educated decisions about which application to use for a given project, the job aid lists the final products Captivate can create (job aid p.3).
  7. 7. Decision #3 – Use of white space Use of white space is exceptionally important in this format due to the dense amount of data. The vast amount of information demands that I provide visual breathing room (Duarte, 2008, p.106). This helps place content at center stage so readers can identify the main points quickly (Duarte, 2008, p.94). My strongest examples are on pages 8, 16, and 19. Text Decision #1 – Blending comics with mapped annotated picture diagrams This helps balance a playful story-telling method with structured informational content. The dialogue I’ve created between the two characters works as a realistic story, which is directly related to the issue and effectively illustrates my evidence (Abela, 2008, p.67). By keeping the font consistent throughout the dialogue and the annotations, I create cohesiveness throughout the job aid. Decision #2 – What text goes where? Because I used both quotations from comic characters and annotations, I made decisions about how to use each technique. These decisions helped me establish a choice of flow as I guide readers through the job aid (McCloud, 2006, p.32). I use the dialogue that takes place between the two characters mainly to explain where they’re located within Captivate and the prevalent benefits. For example, Suzie’s character on pages 5 and 6 explains which view the reader is looking at and how to get there. Lori’s character on pages 11 and 12 exclaims her excitement about the quantity of things she can customize. Decision #3 – Letting the text in Captivate’s windows speak for themselves Rather than listing redundant information, I chose to use the text inside Captivate screenshots to work for me. My strongest examples are on page 7 where I typed the information that would otherwise go into an annotation into the actual Text caption and Rollover caption. This is another example of how words and pictures create effects that neither could create separately (McCloud, 2006, p.4).
  8. 8. Layout Decision #1 –Reading flow left-to-right, up-to-down Due to the large amount of content I include in a small amount of space, it’s vital that I create a clear and cohesive flow of information. I took McCloud’s advice to honor the unwritten contract with my reader to present my information left-to-right, and then up-to-down (2006, p.32). My strongest examples are on pages 7-9. This helps readers know in which order to process the information (Duarte, 2008, p.92). Decision #2 – Simplicity of design and complexity of detail One of my main goals is to achieve simplicity of design and complexity of detail (Abela, 2008, p.138). An example of this is on page 11. The Slide Properties window can be exceptionally daunting because there are multiple settings available. I use only one annotation box to increase the simplicity of the layout without sacrificing the complexity of the information. The lines linking each option to its definition allows me to do so. Decision #3 – Chunking information to increase clarity Because I want my readers to understand my message and continue reading until I’m finished (McCloud, 2006, p.8), I strive to make reader comprehensions my ultimate goal (McCloud, 2006, p. 37). To accomplish this, I chunk my information appropriately and place clear, distinct visual labels for each section (p. 5-7, 10-15, 17-21). Measurement Ideally, I would assess an individual’s final product (eLearning, presentation, etc.) before and after learning Captivate (with the assistance of my job aid). I could then compare the quality of each product to determine if the reader can use Captivate effectively. Other techniques include: • Comparisons of before and after development time • Comparisons of before and after development cost • Comparison of before and after job satisfaction as determined by a survey
  9. 9. Peer Review Results 1. Is my general placement effective? List two ways to improve it. Reviewer 1: • I thought the general placement of your comics was good, though the placement on the page itself kind of bothered me. The gray column on the right threw me off and made the pages feel heavy towards the left. The only two options I could think of would be to delete it and fill up the page, or just fill up the page and place the comics on top of the gray section as well. I think it would help to find some kind of balance. • Cutting off the comics at the bottom of the page also threw me off a little. I kept wanting to see a defined line within the page. Could you frame the whole page and place the character on the bottom edge of the box? I think that would maintain the comic theme and help it to flow a little better. Reviewer 2: • One thing that I can recommend is to bring the characters and speech bubbles in closer to the screenshots (on the pages where the characters are interacting directly with the images). As it is, there’s a slight visual disconnect between their reaction and things they’re reacting to. I don’t know what software you are using to create the characters or what the limitations are, but if it’s feasible, you may consider integrating the characters with the screenshots so that their reactions are more immediate. • Another thing that you can do is bring the final panel (with the impressed boss) into the rest of the story line – before the Bibliography. If you want to keep it as an epilogue of sorts, you can put it on its own page and enlarge it, but I wouldn’t separate it from the rest of the story by putting any other content between it and the instructional part. Changes Made: • I agreed with most of these comments. I moved the characters closer to the content, which pulled them up from the bottom of the page. • I did not add a frame to the whole page, but I believe the other changes would resolve the visual issues my peer experienced. • The final panel was an issue of my draft being incomplete. I do believe it fits into the product now. 2. If you do not know Captivate, do you think you could navigate through the application by using this job aid? Please list at least three things that would make it more effective. Reviewer 1: • Yes, I think I could basically navigate through Captivate after reading this job aid. • Some of the pages seem really stuffed with information, could you spread it out a little. Sometimes I had a difficult time deciphering the information.
  10. 10. • It comes to mind that a company might uses template, does yours do that? Would it be good to encourage that when teaching about templates if you do? • What do you publish it to? Where does it go from here? I am not sure how your job handles this, but maybe you could include contact or direct them to the person to deliver the video to. Reviewer 2: • I have never used Captivate, but after reading this, I think I could use it. However, I thought the layout of the “Object Toolbar” section was rather confusing. It would be helpful if the arrows and boxes followed a traditional left-to-right, top-to-bottom layout (like reading ordinary text). Using another intuitive layout (like clockwise or counterclockwise) would also be effective. As it is, it looks a bit out of order. • On page 9, I’m not sure what you mean by “order of layers.” I’m a simple PowerPoint user, so “layers” in a presentation is a new concept to me. I also don’t know what “Lock slide” means – never mind, it’s on page 10. Still, it might nice to have some terms defined when they first appear. To maintain consistency, you would still include the definition with the others on page 10. It really doesn’t hurt to have a definition appear twice. • Page 11: “Once audio is attached to a slide, you can edit, replace, or delete it here.” How? • Page 14: Where would I find the quiz option in the context of the screen? Other than that, creating quizzes looks pretty easy. Changes Made: • I have an extraordinary amount of information in this job aid. To combat my misjudgment of quantity, I struggled with layout and placement greatly. I attempted to make my data displays as dense as possible, however after receiving this feedback in the peer reviews, I opted to extend the number of pages in my job aid in exchange for clarity of information. • I elected to not include information about Templates because it actually does not apply to my company (or former companies) so I don’t think it would be of great value. However, this comment made me wonder, and I am sure to research the options available in that menu in the future! • I also elected to exclude information about how to edit audio. I believe this would have created a significant digression and would be best portrayed in a job aid on its own. I prefer to maintain the element of the tour and simple navigation as much as possible.
  11. 11. 3. I’m concerned about the font. The pages have two fonts, a title font and Arial for the text boxes. Is Arial too simple? Should I have the same font in the title and text boxes since the comic characters use a third font? Reviewer 1: • Honestly, yes. I think it is too simple. I think it would be better to find a font similar to the character speaking. If it is her still speaking I think it should look the same throughout. I also think it will help with the flow of the comic and help it to stick out a little more from the screenshots. Reviewer 2: • The title font is fine. It would look more consistent if the font in the text boxes were the same as the font in the speech bubbles; in a way, the text boxes do contain dialogue in the form of explanation. You can’t go wrong with simplicity, but I know what you mean about Arial. It’s a little over-used, maybe. It’s not bad, but we all see it a lot. As for the font in the speech bubbles, did you add Italics or is that just how the font looks? If you’re going to make the dialogue font the same as the instruction font, consider using something without Italics. Changes Made • I took this advice and changed the font in the annotations to match the font in the dialogue boxes. This posed a lot of technical difficulties. (I could not identify the font used in ToonDoo.com easily and did not have any fonts installed that matched it even remotely. I have also never installed a font – yikes.) It worked out and I’m extremely pleased with the results. It was great advice! 4. I’m struggling including the elements required of this project (project description pg. 2). Please list two suggestions to help me incorporate at least three of the four elements required. Reviewer 1: • You already have the two elements, “A narrative sequence” and “annotated pictures/diagrams.” • Compare and Contrast – You kind of do this with Powerpoint at the beginning, but think you could maybe do this a little further within the project aspects. Maybe with quizzes, why would I want to choose one type of quiz over another? What would work in a specific situation? Maybe the teacher could suggest a type for this project and tell Lori why it is the best.
  12. 12. • Representation showing changes over time. – Sorry, Suzie, I am completely stumped with this one. I’m not sure how you could show change over time unless you walked the reader through actually creating a Captive project instead of showing the capabilities and menus. Reviewer 2: • Mapped diagrams – check. • Compare/contrast – You could do this as a before/after - Maybe at the beginning you could have Lori show Suzie (and the audience) a lackluster slide that she made with PowerPoint, then show it again at the end next to the improved slide made with Captivate. If you take my suggestion above about moving the “impressed boss” panel to a separate page, you could display the before/after panel next to the “impressed boss” panel so we can see what impressed him so much. • Instructional narrative – check. • That’s three. Changes Made: • This feedback made me feel much more confident that I was adhering to directions correctly and helped me understand the concepts better. • I added a Final Product section and a compare-and-contrast example of work to the job aid. Not only did this help me fulfill the requirements of the assignment, but it gave me a much stronger conclusion.
  13. 13. 5. Please list the three weakest aspects of my job aid and a suggestion about how to fix it. Reviewer 1: • Layouts: The picture on the front is not properly aligned, so that the white background of the picture bleeds into the gray background. Just shift it over to the left. As well, the arrows on page three are pointing outside of the area. I was looking for a menu above the green for a little while before realizing that the red rectangles were what the arrows and boxes were referring to. Maybe get rid of the arrows or bring them down to point at the boxes. • The amount of information on the middle pages. I think it would be helpful for you to spread the information out a little further so that it is not as jam packed. Someone not used to Adobe products may find it more overwhelming. • I think the Arial text is one of the weakest points. If you could find a font that matched the teaching character’s I think it would help to maintain the narrative. I feel the font difference really affects the story in the comic and makes it seem less like a story and more formal. Reviewer 2: • The physical distance of the characters from the things they’re describing/reacting to (see above) • The confusing layout of the Object Toolbar explanation (also see above) • Other pages, too, are rather confusing. It’s kind of overwhelming - I don’t really know where to look first. It would help if you could establish a clear path for the reader’s eyes to follow. Ideally the pattern would be the same on each page. Changes Made: • I moved the characters closer to the content, which pulled them up on the page. • I changed the font in the annotations to match the font in the dialogue boxes. • I extended the number of pages in my job aid in exchange for clarity of information.
  14. 14. Bibliography Abela, A. (2008). Advanced Presentations by Design: Creating Great Presentations. San Francisco: Pffeiffer. Clark, R. C. (2003). e-Learning and the Science of Instruction. San Francisco: Pfeiffer. Duarte, N. (2008). Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media, Inc. McCloud, S. (2006). Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Magna and Graphic Novels. New York: Harper. Medina. J. (2008). Brain rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School. Seattle: Pear Press. Plumer, T., Jr. (2009). Captivate 4 Essential Training - Introducing Captivate. Retrieved March 15, 2010 from Lynda.com: http://www.lynda.com/home/displaycourse.aspx?lpk2=47546# . ToonDoo Maker. (2009). Retrieved March 16, 2010 from ToonDoo.com: http://www.toondoo.com/createtoon.do?param=openfullwindow. Tufte, Edward (2006). Beautiful Evidence. Cheshire, CT: Graphics Press. Using Adobe Captivate 4 for Windows. (2008). New York: Adobe Systems Incorporated: http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Captivate/4.0/Using/captivate_4_help.pdf.
  15. 15. Appendix A - Abela Worksheets Worksheet A.1a. Audience Personality Type Audience Personality Type Anyone interested in learning the basic components of Captivate – all ages, backgrounds, education levels, etc. Unknown / Varies Worksheet A.1b. Audience Personality Implications Personality Type Typical Need How to meet typical needs Examples from the Captivate Job Aid Introvert Time to reflect on information Provide information in advance Distribution techniques may vary, but I plan to post the job aid to a SharePoint cite so users can access it at all times. Extrovert Interactive discussion Plan for lots of discussion / Q&A I use a conversational interaction through charatcers to simulate an interactive experience (p.2-3, 7, 18). I also refer users to tutorial and resources that include message and discussion boards (p.3). Sensor The facts and all the details Include all relevant facts and details I present relevant facts and details (as applicable) in all aspects of the job aid (p.3-20). Intuitor The big picture Provide an overview up-front The characters exemplify the big picture as they discuss a problem that Captivate can solve (p.2). Additionally, one character states the big picture on page 3 when she explains the purpose and value of Captivate. Thinker Principles involved, costs, benefits Identify principles, costs, and benefits The principles and benefits are implied throughout the conversation on pages 2-3 when the characters explain the functions of Captivate that will solve the problem at hand. Feeler To whom it is valuable State implication for the audience The conversation on pages 2-3 exemplifies a situation that depicts two employees who create presentations. This implies that it will benefit professional workers, but also mentions other functions (p.3) such as eLearning, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts that could apply to both professional and recreational users. Judger Conclusions Present conclusions up-front The conclusion is presented on pages 2-3 when the characters explain that Captivate can help create a highly interactive, engaging self-running presentation with software simulations and a quiz. Perceiver Alternatives List all alternatives considered Page 21 shows a before and after representation of the character’s work. This illustrates an alternative application and methods considered in comparison to Captivate.
  16. 16. Captivate is a highly intriguing program, which offers robust and easy-to-use features. Users can create flash-based files without learning Flash or html code. Because files can be published into SWF files, people can view them online, in eLearning presentations, through learning management systems, or in offline browser windows. Users can create self-running presentations, software demonstrations and simulations, quizzes, slideshows, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts. These versatile features make it attractive to many users from countless professional fields. Therefore, my audience must be broad and all-inclusive. From To Think Captivate is a difficult program that only advanced designers use; it requires significant training to learn. Captivate is easy! Many elements of Captivate are similar to other applications with which users are likely familiar. Once they get used to navigating in Captivate, they can use it with little difficulty. Do Use PowerPoint as the default application for all projects Witness the capabilities of Captivate and identify its functions so they can make an educated decision about which application to use for a given project Do Create linear electronic page turners (with or without narration) Design and develop creative training materials, presentations, etc. that employ engaging animations and interactions Worksheet A.3. Audience Problem The audience’s problem is simply that they do not know how to use Captivate. They do not have an application that lets them create self-running presentations, software demonstrations and simulations, quizzes, slideshows, branching content, screencasts, and podcasts quickly and easily. As a result, their presentations or eLearning courses may become mundane electronic page- turners. These types of presentations do not achieve their goal. In the case of eLearning, the goal is to build new knowledge or skills using content that is relevant to learning objectives, instructional methods such as examples and practice, and media elements (Clark, 2003). This is difficult or impossible to do in many software applications. Even when possible, the media is not often dynamic and engaging. But why is dynamic content important? Today’s learners are enveloped in electronic environments through the Internet, TV, and video games. Their expectations for entertainment have grown, and in turn, their expectations for all forms of media have grown. Dynamic presentations and eLearning courses engage and motivate learners. Many members of my audience may believe they have to learn Flash and html code to create dynamic and engaging content; these skills can be cumbersome, time-consuming, and difficult to learn. Captivate provides an alternative. It has a simple user interface that mirrors many applications users may already use, but it produces high-end flash products complete with animations and interactions.
  17. 17. Worksheet A.4. Spectrum of Solution Contributions This job aid introduces new users to the Captivate interface. It provides a tour that includes information they’re likely to need, but excludes extraneous or advanced skills and settings. Although this only solves part of the problem, this job aid provides foundational knowledge for the basics of Captivate that addresses the immediate needs of new users, and provides a one-stop- shop resource users can reference while on the job. Worksheet A.5. Solution Evaluation Evaluation Criteria Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Captivate PowerPoint Flash Quality of Final Product Quizzes, interactions, simulations, screencasts, video Animations are possible, interactions are not Quizzes, interactions, simulations, video; Flash has more capabilities than Captivate (aside from screencasts) Development Time 100 hours 80 hours 180 hours Development Cost $100,000 $80,000 $180,000 Job Satisfaction Currently unknown - Ask employees to rate their satisfaction with the tools available Currently unknown - Ask employees to rate their satisfaction with the tools available Currently unknown - Ask employees to rate their satisfaction with the tools available
  18. 18. Worksheet A.6. List of Evidence Evidence: • Visuals of the sections of Captivate beginners need • How to navigate to the aforementioned sections • The functions of relevant features • How to set preferences (slide, recording, quiz, project) • How to capture screen images • How to create Quiz slides • Previewing and publishing projects Worksheet A.7 Stakeholder Analysis Who will be impacted by the success or failure of this instructional product? Group A Developers (My Audience) Group B Training Managers Group C Participants (My Audience’s Audience) What is their role in the success or failure of this instructional product? Using the job aid to make presentations and eLearning courses using Captivate Evaluating content developers create Receiving the content developers make How will they be impacted if the instructional product is a success (i.e., learners achieve learning objectives)? Increased scores on performance appraisal, positive reputation The content represents them and their department; they will receive praise, incentives, or bonuses Full understanding of the content, ability to do their job well How will they be impacted if the instructional product is a failure (i.e., learners do not achieve learning objectives)? Decreased scores on performance appraisal, negative reputation The content represents them and their department; they will lose incentives or bonuses Poor understanding of the content, inability to do their job well

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