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SEAI Communities 2019 Preview

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Presentations from the 2019 Communities preview, 27th September 2018.

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SEAI Communities 2019 Preview

  1. 1. Welcome Communities 2019 Preview Questions? Visit sli.do and enter this code: #7952
  2. 2. AgendaAGENDA 10am Welcome John Randles Head of Delivery SEAI 10.10am Policy Update – Communities Programme Review Rebecca Minch: Principal Officer, Energy Efficiency & Affordability Division, DCCAE 10.30am Behavioural Economics & Decision Making for Communities Karl Purcell: Behavioural Economics Unit – Programme Manager SEAI 10.50am Deep Retrofit Programme Update Conor Hanniffy: Deep Retrofit – Programme Manager SEAI 11.10am Q&A with Sli.do – #7952 11.20am Important New Building Regulations – Part L Orla Coyle: Near Zero Energy Building – Programme Manager SEAI 11.40am Communities 2019 & What’s Next John Flynn: Better Energy Communities – Programme Manager 12.10pm Q&A with Sli.do – #7952
  3. 3. Policy Update – Communities Programme Review Rebecca Minch Principal Officer, Energy Efficiency & Affordability Division DCCAE
  4. 4. Karl Purcell Behavioural Economics Unit – Programme Manager - SEAI How can we get more homeowners to upgrade their home? 4
  5. 5. Outline – What I’m going to cover today… 1. How do people make energy related decisions? – Why don’t people engage in energy saving behaviour? – How do people think about energy? 2. An introduction to Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM)? – What is it? – Why is it useful? 3. Some actionable takeaways! – Improving home energy audit reports – Talking to people in their language – Energy auditors as energy upgrade advocates
  6. 6. This is a no-brainer, why aren’t people doing “X”? Why don’t people engage in energy saving behaviours?
  7. 7. Some Typical Diagnoses… People aren’t engaging because… • They aren’t aware of the problem and the solutions we provide • The offering is not in their economic self-interest • They don’t care about the environment So, we should… • Run an awareness campaign and provide information • Give grants and highlight payback periods • Change their attitudes through awareness campaigns
  8. 8. Does providing information to change attitudes lead to behaviour change? • Information is often ineffective when provided alone • For example: • Energy Efficiency Workshop designed to change attitudes and knowledge • Only 2/40 installed wrap • Only 8/40 installed shower head 8
  9. 9. Are people motivated by economic self interest? Are people economically rational? ‘Perfectly rational’ people should: • Switch energy providers every year • Invest in energy projects with a positive rate of return • Monitor their energy bill and change their consumption when it becomes too expensive What people actually do… • Stay with the same provider for years • Fail to apply for free energy upgrade schemes • Pay bills automatically by direct debit and only notice large spikes in their bills
  10. 10. How Do People Think About Energy? • They use simple rules of thumb to make decisions • Most people have a relatively low level of energy literacy • Availability Bias – “Switching off lights and appliances” • Focus on high level signals - “A rated means A rated” 10 They Don’t!
  11. 11. The Power of Community Based Social Marketing 11www.seai.ie
  12. 12. Community Based Social Marketing – The Four Steps Define Diagnose Design Test 12
  13. 13. Define Some tips: – Get uncomfortably specific – Define an end-state behaviour – Define a SMART Goal so you know what success looks like – Do not include a solution in your problem definition Example: “To purchase and install one ENERGY STAR-certified LED reflector bulb for a recessed can light fixture”
  14. 14. Diagnose Some tips: – Draw the person’s likely journey – what do they need to do and when? – What barriers might they face at each stage? What motivations can you amplify to encourage behaviour? – Typical barriers include: Cost, time, lack of awareness, mistaken beliefs etc. Example: LED’s were expensive and many believed it was “wasteful” to replace a working bulb
  15. 15. Design Barrier Solution Cost of bulbs Subsidise bulbs Awareness Direct mail shots, sticky notes on local papers, in-bag flyers, web banners Myths/Lack of information In-store information stand Intention- action Gap Pledge Cards
  16. 16. Test Some tips: – Embed data collection into your intervention – Measure success against a similar group – Define a SMART goal Example: – Pledge cards – allowed for follow up
  17. 17. Some Actionable Take-Aways Some tips you can start applying today! 17
  18. 18. Improving Home Energy Audit Reports 18 www.seai.ie
  19. 19. Talking to People in Their Language 19 www.seai.ie OR
  20. 20. Energy Auditors as Energy Upgrade Advocates • Providing sales training to energy auditors may significantly increase sales • Auditors were trained how to communicate their technical findings to align with the personal needs of the ‘customer’ • Auditors were provided with basic checklists and proposal templates which included: – Scales measuring the homeowners motivations for upgrading – Questions to qualify customers interested in upgrades – Reminders for auditors to, for example, compliment the person’s home and offer to remove their shoes 20 www.seai.ie
  21. 21. Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme 1st Insights Conor Hanniffy Deep Retrofit – Programme Manager - SEAI
  22. 22. SEAI Strategy Statement 2017 - 2021 Key Challenge for SEAI The requirement for large-scale and deeper retrofit within our built environment in order to maximise energy efficiencies 22 Vision & Policy Associated challenges: o development of appropriate technical solutions o consumer awareness and adoption o finance models
  23. 23. 23 Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme • Multi annual pilot programme 2017 -2019 • €5m budget allocation 2018 • Residential market only
  24. 24. Guiding Principles • Minimum A3 Building Energy Rating and uplift of 150 kWh/m2/yr • Whole house solution with a fabric first philosophy • Deployment of renewables - fossil fuels are not funded • Demonstrate comfort and health benefits e.g. Indoor Air Quality 24 Deep Retrofit?
  25. 25. 25 Scheme changes to date  50% support of energy capital costs  Requirement for pre-2006 homes is removed (150 kWh/m2/yr)  Air permeability ≤ 5 m3/hr/m2 - Importance of pre-works airtightness plan  5% project management + 2% design & BER + 1% bonus (3m3/m2/hr)  Additional milestone payment at 25% completion stage - 25%, 50%, 90%, 100% (12 months post works)
  26. 26. 26 Target market • 1m homes • €35b estimated spend to 2050
  27. 27. 27 The challenges & opportunities Lack of deep retrofit service providers Confidence & skills to move to deep retrofit Time to form service providers Consumer Awareness & uptake of private finance Technical solutions Finance models
  28. 28. Initial Insights from the pilot evaluation
  29. 29. 29 Applications Increasing June 2018 187 DRP homes started / in progress November 2017 43 DRP homes in process
  30. 30. 30 BER and kWh / m2 Uplift Average BER pre works = F/G Average BER post works = A3 0.00 100.00 200.00 300.00 400.00 500.00 600.00 552 kWh/m2/yr 53 kWh/m2/yr kWh/m2/year Before After
  31. 31. 31 Airtightness Uplift 0.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 1 8.69 m3/hr/m2 4.37 m3/hr/m2 m3/hr/m2 average airtightness pre work average airtightness post work 44% had a pre- works air permeability of > 10 m3/hr/m2
  32. 32. 32 Who is Participating? Family Types Age Profile Age of homes 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 38% 6% 19% 38% 1994-2006 1979-1993 1950-1978 Before 1950
  33. 33. 33 Types of homes? 33 House types 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% 48% 17% 12% 7% 7% 5% 5%
  34. 34. 34 Householder Motivations What are the top 3 householder motivations for carrying out a deep retrofit? “We used to have ice form on the inside of windows in the north facing rooms” 2. To save money on my energy bills Financial 3. To reduce the impact of our household on the environment Environmental 1. To make my home ‘warmer and more cosy’ is the biggest motivator (78%) Comfort
  35. 35. 35 Householder Satisfaction 94% Of respondents were ‘very happy’ with the outcome of the deep retrofit works. This is reflected in householder comments about their finished works: of householders are confident in their ability to use their new technology and controls. 67% Householder Satisfaction
  36. 36. 36 Home Environment How did homeowners rate air quality before and after the deep retrofit? Air quality Before After No draughts Draughty Air was dry Air was damp Air is dry Air is damp No draughts Draughty Average position circled by respondents Direct and indirect impacts of the deep retrofit Before After
  37. 37. 37 Home Environment Before Before Comfortable Uncomfortable Too hot Too cold Comfortable Uncomfortable Temperature Too hot Too cold Average position circled by respondents How did homeowners rate temperature before and after the deep retrofit? Direct and indirect impacts of the deep retrofit AfterAfter
  38. 38. 38 Benefits Householder Opinion 76% feel the value of their house has increased 94% answered their home feels less damp 69% don’t have the heating on as much 53% of householders notice that they use more rooms in the house
  39. 39. 39 Health Benefits 94% think the air in their home is healthier 35% find they have had fewer trips to the doctor Householder Opinion “I would have serious chest infections once the winter hit, and I’ll tell you, this year is the first time in a long time where I didn’t have to go on an anti- biotic” “We had to have the fire on all winter before. My brother used to come up and he would be so chesty after. Now we have the wood burning stove, and he hasn’t had a problem since.”
  40. 40. 40 Contractor Motivations Top 3 reasons given for getting involved in the Deep Retrofit Pilot 1. To develop business and grow capacity 2. To gain a competitive advantage 3. Environmentally motivated / interested in zero energy buildings Developing business and growing capacity was ranked first by 50% of contractors, otherwise motivations were evenly split across other options. Strategic Environmental Financial
  41. 41. 41 Success Factors What was most important to the success of your project? Top five factors as ranked by contractors Whole house approach Level of funding provided by SEAI Support from the SEAI team End-to-end project management and additional Clerk of Works resource 1 2 3 4 5 Trading energy credits Other factors • Other finance options i.e. low interest loans • Access to contractor workshops/training • Access to technology associations • Follow up with clients post-handover
  42. 42. 42 Deep Retrofit Pilot Programme - Slane Video
  43. 43. Q&A Communities 2019 Preview Questions? Visit sli.do and enter this code: #7952
  44. 44. Orla Coyle NZEB and High Performance Retrofit- Programme Manager SEAI Better Energy Communities Building Regulations
  45. 45. • Member states to ensure that all new buildings are “Nearly Zero Energy Buildings” by 31st Dec 2020 • Member states to ensure that all new buildings owned and occupied by Public Authorities are `Nearly Zero Energy Buildings’ after 31st Dec 2018 • Major Renovations to be at Cost Optimal Level in Building Codes . Energy Performance of Buildings Directive
  46. 46. Energy Performance of Buildings Directive Article 9 Nearly Zero Energy Buildings are defined as….. “nearly zero-energy buildings” means a building that has a very high energy performance, as determined in accordance with Annex I. The nearly zero or very low amount of energy required should be covered to a very significant extent by energy from renewable sources, including energy from renewable sources produced on-site or nearby;” Article 7 Major Renovations to be at Cost Optimal Level in Building Codes . “more than 25% of the surface area of the building envelope undergoes renovation”
  47. 47. Cost Optimal Study
  48. 48. Buildings Other than Dwellings - Requirements
  49. 49. Implementation of EPBD-Part L Buildings other than Dwellings • December 2017: Part L of the Building Regulations 2017 for buildings other than dwellings – Work, material alteration or the change of use commences or takes place on or before 31st December 2018 – Where planning approval or permission for buildings has been applied for on or before 31st December 2018, and substantial work has been completed by 1st January 2020
  50. 50. Non Domestic – New Buildings - NZEB Based on NEAP Methodology 60% Improvement on Previous Regulations - Improvement in Fabric Performance - Improvement in Efficiency of Systems - 10% to 20% Renewable Energy OPW – Lesson Lane
  51. 51. Non Domestic – Existing Buildings – Major Renovation Department of Education and Skills – Aughrim National School Upgrade: - Heating - Cooling - Lighting - Ventilation
  52. 52. • >25% of the surface area of building envelope undergoes renovation – Cladding external surface – Dry lining internal surface – Replacing windows – Excludes painting / replastering • Performance of entire building improved to ‘Cost Optimal’ levels – Upgrading oil / gas heating systems >15 years old – Upgrading direct electric heating controls – Upgrading cooling systems >15 years old – Upgrading lighting systems >15 years old OR systems with efficacy < 50lms/W • Alternate Option Table 13 Major Renovations
  53. 53. Fabric Performance • New building U values apply to extensions • Material alterations have revised U values Building Element Area Weighted Elemental U Value W/m2.K Max Average Elemental U Value W/m2.K Pitched Roof 0.16 0.35 Flat Roof 0.25 0.35 Cavity Wall 0.55 0.6 Other Wall 0.35 0.6 Curtain Wall 1.8 1.8 Door, Window, Rooflight 1.6 3.0 Ground Floor 0.45*
  54. 54. • Material change of use requires minimum U values for all building elements if they exceed threshold Existing Buildings Building Element Area Weighted Threshold U Value W/m2.K Area Weighted Elemental U Value W/m2.K Max Average Elemental U Value W/m2.K Pitched Roof 0.16 0.16 0.35 Flat Roof 0.35 0.25 0.35 Cavity Wall 0.55 0.55 0.6 Other Wall 0.55 0.35 0.6 Curtain Wall 3.6 1.8 1.8 Door, Window, Rooflight 3.6 1.6 3.0 Ground Floor 0.45 0.45 0.6 Other Exposed Floor 0.6 0.25 0.6
  55. 55. • Heat generator efficiencies – 93% for boilers >70kW and <= 400 kW – 86% for boilers <70kW • Heat pumps must meet EcoDesign directive efficiencies • Defined minimum controls / BMS for various heating systems • Maximum specific fan power (SFP) reduced for various systems • All motors > 1.1kW should have variable speed drives Building Services
  56. 56. • Cooling system efficiencies as per EcoDesign directive • Minimum control requirements • Systems > 70kW effective rated output, BACS – Continuously monitoring, analysing and allowing for adjusting energy usage including that provided by renewable energy technologies; – Benchmarking the building’s energy efficiency, detecting losses in efficiency of technical building systems, and informing the person responsible for the facilities or technical building management about opportunities for energy efficiency improvement; – Allowing communication with connected technical building systems and other appliances inside the building, and being interoperable with technical building systems across different types of proprietary technologies, devices and manufacturers, and – Monitoring the energy provided by renewable energy technologies. Building Services
  57. 57. • Minimum controls – Manual switches – Daylight sensing switching / dimming – PIR’s – Time controls • Minimum standards for efficacy – Lower efficacies acceptable with better controls Lighting 57
  58. 58. Dwelling
  59. 59. Domestic – New Buildings - NZEB Durkan Homes – Citywest 25% Improvement on Current Regulations Same Fabric Performance - Boiler with Increased PV - Boiler with MVHR and PV - Heat Pump
  60. 60. Upgrade - Fabric - Heating & Controls Domestic – Existing Buildings – Major Renovation Deep Retrofit Supported Project “more than 25% of the surface area of the building envelope undergoes renovation”
  61. 61. Implementation of EPBD-Part L Buildings other than Dwellings PUBLIC CONSULTATION • Part L of the Building Regulations 2018 for dwellings – Applies to new dwellings commencing construction from 1st April 2019 – Transitional arrangements; Where planning approval or permission for buildings has been applied for on or before 1st April 2019, and substantial work has been completed by 31st March 2020
  62. 62. >25% of the surface area of building envelope undergoes renovation that is technically, functionally and economically feasible – Cladding external surface – Dry lining internal surface – Above and Window/ Roof or Floor Renovation • Performance of entire building improved to ‘Cost Optimal’ levels – Upgrade insulation at ceiling level where U Values are greater than in Table 5 of Part L, – Oil or gas boiler replacement & controls upgrade where the oil or gas boiler is more than 15 years old and efficiency less than 86% – Replacement of electric storage heating systems where more than 15 years and with heat retention heaters • Primary Energy <125 kWh/m2/yr Major Renovations – Domestic – Public Consultation
  63. 63. • Upgrade in Window Fabric Performance
  64. 64. • Heat generator efficiencies – 90% Boilers • Electric Heat pumps must meet EcoDesign directive efficiencies – 300 for Space Heating – 150 for Domestic Hot Water • Gas Fired Heat pumps must meet EcoDesign directive efficiencies – 150 for Space Heating – 100 for Domestic Hot Water • Minimum Control and Insulation Requirements Building Services
  65. 65. Communities Grant Programme 2019 John Flynn Better Energy Communities – Programme Manager - SEAI
  66. 66. 66 Communities 2012 to 2018 • 17,500 homes completed • 2000 non domestic projects complete • Total Project spend €300M • Total grants €125M • Energy savings 540GWh
  67. 67. BEC review 67 Thank you for your feedback! Review pending publication. Some of the findings will be implemented in 2019, Continuous feedback needed.
  68. 68. 68 2019 Programme Objectives • Longer contracting time, • Scheme for small and large projects, • Contract all year round subject to budgets, • Ideally we would have 3 contracts 9, 6 and 3 months, *Engage with Communities team prior to an application*
  69. 69. 69 Communities 2019 Grant Programme • Guidelines will be available by the end of October, • SEAI will open for applications once the guidelines are published, • Communities programme will be available to big projects and smaller SEC styled applicants.
  70. 70. 70 Communities 2019 Usual questions are: 1. Closing date for works?  14th October 2019 2. Application deadline?  None **This is a first come first served process!! SEAI will publish monthly the application status update.
  71. 71. 71 Communities 2019 headlines 1. Maximum grant level 50%, 2. PM fees 7%, 3. No scope changes permitted, 4. 25% funding requirement at contract stage, 5. Applications accepted all year round. • Milestones will be set by Project Coordinator, • Project Mgt (PM) fee to be reduced by 1% for each milestone missed • Bonus payments rolled into PM fee
  72. 72. 72 6. SEAI will commit to a project evaluation turnaround time of 8-10 weeks subject to speedy clarifications from applicants, 7. Habited Islands applications will receive additional points to support delivery, 8. Smaller projects (€200,000) may be single measure, 9. Changes to the Domestic requirements. Communities 2019
  73. 73. 73 Domestic Changes • Building Regulations part L - B2 requirement, • Stoves (solid fuel) to conform to the “clear air directive”, • Projects under €200K (Grant) may be single measure and a mix not required, (to spend on SEC participants)
  74. 74. 74 • Pre and Post BER’s must be published and available, • Minimum number homes for larger projects is 5 homes (€200,000 is deemed small), • Fossil Fuel upgrades are allowed but not supported by a grant. Domestic Changes
  75. 75. 75 Milestones • Set by project coordinator, • The milestones and your delivery must match to SEAI requirements* , • Projects with unrealistic milestones will not be evaluated or declined, • PM fees will reduce when milestones are missed, • Payments will be based on works undertaken on completed projects.
  76. 76. * Larger projects should be 50% delivered by August *Smaller projects must be 70% delivered by September 76 Guidance
  77. 77. 77 www.seai.ie Milestone examples
  78. 78. 78 www.seai.ie SEAI will reject this!!! Project X Grant Delivery Milestone St Catherns 30000 October 3 Dundalk Fire station 9000 October 3 Clancys pub 15000 October 3 The library 6000 October 3 Hospital 150000 October 3 Factory 1 75000 October 3 285000 Milestone 1 285000 October
  79. 79. 79 Workshops Workshops to be confirmed
  80. 80. Q&A Communities 2019 Preview Questions? Visit sli.do and enter this code: #7952
  81. 81. Thank you for attending

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