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Susie Wilson-Etiquette Expert
ETIQUETTE & ETHICS
Introduction
Ethic (n) 1.a. A set of principles of right conduct. b. A th...
ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS
2
● The Importance of Ethics in
Business
When business are engaged in multinational activ...
ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS
3
The United Nations Global Compact encourages business everywhere to advance and honor t...
ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS
4
As the process of globalisation has increased its pace and depth, the problem and need ...
ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS
5
However, if the owners are responsible and share the financial hardships with their emp...
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BUSINESS ETIQUETTE REPORT

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The Importance of Ethics in Business
When business are engaged in multinational activities, a variety of important issues arise that do not have the same easy answers as are offered by doing business in only one area of legal jurisdiction or nation. Because of this dilemma that is increasingly plaguing the large multinational corporations, international business ethics has arisen to help address these sticky subject matters. International business ethics attempts to deal with questions of what to do in situations where ethical morals come into conflict as a result of the differing cultural practices.

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BUSINESS ETIQUETTE REPORT

  1. 1. Susie Wilson-Etiquette Expert ETIQUETTE & ETHICS Introduction Ethic (n) 1.a. A set of principles of right conduct. b. A theory or a system of moral values. 2. ethics. The rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the members of a profession. Etiquette (n). The practices and forms prescribed by social convention or by authority. The codes governing correct behaviour. Forms of conduct as prescribed in polite society.
  2. 2. ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS 2 ● The Importance of Ethics in Business When business are engaged in multinational activities, a variety of important issues arise that do not have the same easy answers as are offered by doing business in only one area of legal jurisdiction or nation. Because of this dilemma that is increasingly plaguing the large multinational corporations, international business ethics has arisen to help address these sticky subject matters. International business ethics attempts to deal with questions of what to do in situations where ethical morals come into conflict as a result of the differing cultural practices. There are many international business ethics discussions going on that believe the question of how to behave in the home country versus the host country are the central point. The argument in favor of behaving according to host country socially accepted morals shows respect both to the citizens and the culture of the hosting country in which the business is conducting affairs. Such an argument would tell the business to follow the ancient world adage: When in Rome, do as the Romans do, not simply for etiquette, but also for business ethics. The other side of the argument counters with questions of what a business representative should do when socially accepted norms are morally repugnant to the cultural values of the business' home. As an example, in many Latin American countries, bribing public officials is necessary for doing business. Does this countenance the multinational corporation representatives doing the same out of respect for the host country, or instead argue against participating as it is morally repugnant to the home country of the business in question? A middle ground approach emerges as central to international business ethics. This lies in creating a list of internationally accepted morals that should be consulted in the performance of multinational business dealings. As an example, the United National Global Compact, or the older UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, would be put forward as an appropriate conduct guide for international business ethics.
  3. 3. ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS 3 The United Nations Global Compact encourages business everywhere to advance and honor the internationally accepted human rights, to uphold the right of collective bargaining, to avoid being involved with human rights' abuses, to have no part in compulsory human labor, to do away with child labor, to support a caring and cautious approach to the environment, to reduce any kind of employment discrimination, to encourage the creation of technologies that are friendly to the environment, to encourage more significant personal environmental responsibility, and to work to stamp out corruption in all of its many ugly guises, such as bribery and extortion. Other justice or moral ground theories create different lists of ethical practices for multinational corporations conducting business in countries featuring lower levels of development. One source, DeGeorge, called in 1993 for ten guidelines for the behavior of multinational corporations in other countries. Among these were avoiding harm, honoring human rights, affecting good, respecting local cultures, accepting the responsibilities for individual behaviors, working fairly with honorable institutions and governments, and ensuring that dangerous technologies and factories are made safe for workers and the community. Although such intentions are good and honorable, there are still three different problems with such approaches to international business ethics. First, they ignore or avoid the reality of competition. A real life example involves a company trying to do business honorably in a country that takes and accepts bribes as a regular part of doing business. The business wants to help improve the environment as they do their business, but refuses to pay the government officials bribes. Licenses can not be secured from the governmental officials since no bribes are paid. Market share begins to erode, along with the purpose for having operations placed in the country, as competitors without scruples pay their bribes without any moral restrictions. The company will have to decide which moral is more important, refusing to endorse corruption in paying bribes, or staying to help improve the environment and employ the locales through paying the necessary bribes. A second limitation to such list approaches lies in them only replicating the home country versus host country question that they are supposed to answer. Since the one list advocated working with just institutions and governments, the argument comes full circle again. Whose morals or sense of justice will determine if such entities are just and should be cooperated with or not? Finally, respect for moral norms and local cultures have to come from some culture's concept of justice. Those of the west for ethics, fairness, and justice in general are the ones that are commonly sourced. Clashes between host and home countries must be resolved by some culture's guidelines, whether Western or non-Western.
  4. 4. ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS 4 As the process of globalisation has increased its pace and depth, the problem and need for international business ethics has only intensified. With falling communication and transaction costs that are encouraged by telecommunication and computer technology advances, the global market has recently become a truly global marketplace. Multinational business is more often the standard and not the exception. This is particularly the case where the production of cars, clothes, shoes, and commodity types of goods are concerned. For a business owner, there is a very fine line between doing what's best for the profitability of the company and crossing the line over into the unethical. While many may argue that there is no place for personal values in the dog eat dog world of business, the truth is that ethics can make or break a growing business in a number of ways. Business ethics is far from the only thing that must be addressed for entrepreneurs. It is generally accepted that society values ethics from their businesses. Companies are boycotted for unethical behavior and profits go down as does consumer trust in the company. When consumers and clients feel they cannot trust a business, their natural reaction is to end their loyalty in that business which in turn, lowers the company's profits. If a company can maintain their clients’ loyalty by acting reasonably and ethically while still remaining in the black financially- no small feat for even the most moral business owner- they will find continued success as the business grows and expands. But how exactly does a business remain ethical? The question is one asked time and time again and often there is no clear answer. The ethics of a business are determined by those running it, and understanding the concept does not make for an ethical business owner. This goes for all employees and not just a CEO. Because of this many ethical business will perform a criminal record check for all new job applicants. He or she must have strong moral values and beliefs and have a determination to uphold those beliefs before even entering into the business world. The person must also have a strong character and be able to handle challenging situations. Oftentimes it is a difficult decision to choose between doing what is ethical and doing what is best for the business. Take the example of the small business phone system industry. Telecom is a necessity in every person's life and the industry is of course aware of this. During a seller's market- that is, there are more buyers than sellers, reducing the variety of choice available to the customer- if a store maintains their prices and does not increase to take advantage of the consumers who have little other choice, they will gain the respect and loyalty of their customers during the subsequent buyer's markets, when consumers have more choices for shopping and stores are generally competing for customers. The stores that remained fair to their customers even when they could have raised profits by acting unethically, increase their profitability in the long run. Business ethics can also relate to how we behave in other professional settings outside of our own place or work when we ourselves are the customer. Honesty and integrity are just as important in these situations.
  5. 5. ETIQUETTE AND ETHICS IN BUSINESS 5 However, if the owners are responsible and share the financial hardships with their employees, with those on the upper rungs taking pay cuts and laying of a reasonable number of lower rung workers, both the employees and customers will have nothing but respect for the company and will be much more willing to support it, with hard work from the former and higher profits from the latter. While it is the choice of the owners of a business whether or not to remain ethical, it is certainly better in the long run for profits and consumer and employee loyalty to operate with ethics in mind at all times. About Susie Wilson SUSIE WILSON - FOUNDER-DIRECTOR AUSTRALIA’S LEADING ETIQUETTE & FINISHING EXPERT ANTOINETTE CHAMPAGNE FINISHING SCHOOL, MELBOURNE Ms Wilson is a motivational modern etiquette expert, sought out industry leader, accomplished speaker and owner of Antoinette Champagne Finishing School of Melbourne, a company specialising in executive leadership and etiquette. "Society creates “norms” and it is human nature to want to meet those norms. Following my methods takes the concept further; standout, shine and flourish with that extra polish and sophistication." With origins dating back to London’s Victorian Age, founder and director of Antoinette Champagne Finishing School, Susie Wilson, is the epitome of old modern day and deportment. An expert in her field, Susie has presented countless seminars to corporate executives, business organisations, academia, private clubs, and individuals of all ages. She is dedicated to providing her clients with the most up-to-date etiquette and finishing training relevant to today’s modern society.

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