ASLA NSW State Library Day      Engaging Readers                          Susan La Marca           February 2004
Reading for me, is a meansof thought. One way ofsaying this is that literaturegives us images to thinkwith.               ...
ReadingReading literacy is needed to function well in adultlife, whether in fulfilling personal goals, progressingin the l...
ReadingWhat children learn with books is a whole initiationinto such matters as: how do you know whether youare reading a ...
ReadingWe all read ourselves and the world around us inorder to glimpse what and where we are. We read tounderstand, or to...
Reading and school achievement  A print- rich environment leads to more reading and  free voluntary reading is the best pr...
Reading and school achievement  The National Assessment of Educational Progress  (NAEP) 1999 long-term reading assessment ...
Reading and school achievement  Students who read independently become better  readers, score higher on achievement tests ...
Reading and school achievement  (from Conclusion)  Independent reading is the kind students choose to  do on their own; it...
Reading and school achievement  -The amount of free reading done outside school has  consistently been found to relate to ...
Reading and school achievement  -Students reading achievement correlates with  success in school and the amount of indepen...
Reading and school achievement  Student engagement  Students who read well tend to be active readers.  They gain in terms ...
Reading and school achievement  Some important factors such as students home  background are hard to influence. Others, su...
Reading and school achievement  The results show how important it is not just to teach  students to read but to engage the...
Australia   OECD (2000) Reading for  Change: Performance and         Engagement AcrossCountries. Results form PISA 2000 (E...
Enabling adult:the teacher-librarian
AttitudeBertland (1988) found that students patterns ofborrowing books from the library for recreationalreading hinge on t...
Relationships(Executive summary) Libraries, reading, literacy andlearning (point 3.10)Research shows that the relationship...
Enabling adultTeacher-librarians typically place the right book inthe right hands at the right time and encourage alifelon...
Reading environmentTo be successful there should be:   –a large, varied collection of reading materials    –knowledgeab...
Reading environmentTo be successful there should be:   –modelling by staff of positive attitudes towards reading   and the...
Reading environmentIt should come as no surprise that if reading isvalued and promoted, young people will needinteresting ...
Reading environmentA good reading environment, including comfort andquiet, as well as larger library collections, affectre...
Reading environmentWhat is it that enabling adults, teachers especially,do? They provide, stimulate, demonstrate andrespon...
The enabling adult
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Engaging Readers

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Engaging Readers

  1. 1. ASLA NSW State Library Day Engaging Readers   Susan La Marca February 2004
  2. 2. Reading for me, is a meansof thought. One way ofsaying this is that literaturegives us images to thinkwith. (Chambers, 1991, p. 14)
  3. 3. ReadingReading literacy is needed to function well in adultlife, whether in fulfilling personal goals, progressingin the labour market or participating more widely insociety. OECD (2000) Reading for Change: Performance and Engagement Across Countries. Results form PISA 2000 (Executive summary): OECD - PISA (Program  for International Student Assessment). p. 3.
  4. 4. ReadingWhat children learn with books is a whole initiationinto such matters as: how do you know whether youare reading a story or a factual report, how do youknow if someone in a story is telling the truth, howdo you learn to play an author’s game of beingtricked by red herrings, seduced by charmers,repelled by the wicked and much, much more. Infact, most, if not all, the reading we do as adultsrests on the bedrock of having learned as childrenthe devices and techniques of narrative that havebeen developed over thousands of years in literature. Michael Rosen in The Reading Solution by Paul Kropp with Wendy Cooling, Penguin, 1995. 
  5. 5. ReadingWe all read ourselves and the world around us inorder to glimpse what and where we are. We read tounderstand, or to begin to understand. Manguel, A. (1996) A History of Reading.  London: Harper Collins. p. 7. 
  6. 6. Reading and school achievement A print- rich environment leads to more reading and free voluntary reading is the best predictor of comprehension, vocabulary growth, spelling and grammatical ability and writing style. Lonsdale, M. (2003) Impact of School Libraries on Student Achievement: a Review of the Research (Report for the  Australian School Libraries Association - ASLA ). Melbourne:  Australian Council for Educational Research, p. 1. 
  7. 7. Reading and school achievement The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 1999 long-term reading assessment found that reading for fun had a positive relationship to average scores. At all three ages (9, 13, 17 years), students who said they read for fun scored higher than peers who said they never read for fun. Campbell, J. R., Hombo, C. M., & Mazzeo, J. (2000) 1999 Trends in Academic Progress: Three Decades of Student Performance, [online report]. NAEP (National  Assessment of Education Progress) Department of Education, Washington DC.  Available: www.nifl.gov/nifl/facts/reading-facts.html [Accessed 18th November, 2002]. 
  8. 8. Reading and school achievement Students who read independently become better readers, score higher on achievement tests in all subject areas, and have greater content knowledge than those who do not (Krashen 1993; Cunningham and Stanovich 1991; Stanovich and Cunningham 1993). Cullinan, B. E. (2000) Independent Reading and School Achievement, This  manuscript was commissioned as part of a national study - Assessment of the  Role of School and Public Libraries in Support of Educational Reform, Westat,  In., 1998-2000. (Originally prepared for the U.S . Department of Education).  New York: American Library Association. 
  9. 9. Reading and school achievement (from Conclusion) Independent reading is the kind students choose to do on their own; it is not assigned or assessed, but it has a positive effect on learning and school achievement. Research about the effects of independent reading on school achievement and programs planned to promote it demonstrates these common factors: Cullinan, B. E. (2000) Independent Reading and School Achievement, This  manuscript was commissioned as part of a national study - Assessment of the  Role of School and Public Libraries in Support of Educational Reform, Westat,  In., 1998-2000. (Originally prepared for the U.S . Department of Education).  New York: American Library Association. 
  10. 10. Reading and school achievement -The amount of free reading done outside school has consistently been found to relate to achievement in vocabulary, reading comprehension, verbal fluency, and general information. Cullinan, B. E. (2000) Independent Reading and School Achievement, This  manuscript was commissioned as part of a national study - Assessment of the  Role of School and Public Libraries in Support of Educational Reform, Westat,  In., 1998-2000. (Originally prepared for the U.S . Department of Education).  New York: American Library Association. 
  11. 11. Reading and school achievement -Students reading achievement correlates with success in school and the amount of independent reading they do. Cullinan, B. E. (2000) Independent Reading and School Achievement, This  manuscript was commissioned as part of a national study - Assessment of the  Role of School and Public Libraries in Support of Educational Reform, Westat,  In., 1998-2000. (Originally prepared for the U.S . Department of Education).  New York: American Library Association. 
  12. 12. Reading and school achievement Student engagement Students who read well tend to be active readers. They gain in terms of both motivation and experience from reading regularly outside the context of school work. OECD (2000) Reading for Change: Performance and Engagement Across Countries. Results form PISA 2000  (Executive summary ): OECD - PISA (Program for  International Student Assessment). p. 12. 
  13. 13. Reading and school achievement Some important factors such as students home background are hard to influence. Others, such as the way in which schools are organised, are more amenable to change. One crucial factor that education systems can work on is the degree to which students are active and well motivated readers. This report shows that the degree to which students are engaged in reading is a crucial factor associated with reading proficiency. OECD (2000) Reading for Change: Performance and Engagement Across Countries. Results form PISA 2000  (Executive summary): OECD - PISA (Program for  International Student Assessment). p. 3.
  14. 14. Reading and school achievement The results show how important it is not just to teach students to read but to engage them in reading as part of their lives. OECD (2000) Reading for Change: Performance and Engagement Across Countries. Results form PISA 2000  (Executive summary): OECD - PISA (Program for  International Student Assessment). p.12.
  15. 15. Australia OECD (2000) Reading for Change: Performance and Engagement AcrossCountries. Results form PISA 2000 (Executive summary ):  OECD - PISA (Program for  International Student  Assessment)
  16. 16. Enabling adult:the teacher-librarian
  17. 17. AttitudeBertland (1988) found that students patterns ofborrowing books from the library for recreationalreading hinge on the attitudes of their teachers.Teachers who consistently bring their classes to thelibrary for skills lessons and to do content-arearesearch have students who frequently use thelibrary for independent reading. On the other hand,teachers who do not bring their classes to the libraryto select books have students who check out fewerbooks per person. Cullinan, B. E. (2000) Independent Reading and School Achievement, This  manuscript was commissioned as part of a national study - Assessment of the  Role of School and Public Libraries in Support of Educational Reform, Westat,  In., 1998-2000. (Originally prepared for the U.S. Department of Education).  New York: American Library Association. p. 3. 
  18. 18. Relationships(Executive summary) Libraries, reading, literacy andlearning (point 3.10)Research shows that the relationship betweenschool librarians and teachers has a significantimpact on the quality of learning in schools. Betterintegration, mutual understanding and respect needto be developed. CILIP (2002) Start with the Child: Report of the CILIP Working Group on Library Provision for Children and Young People (report ISBN 0 9543792 2 5).  London: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. 
  19. 19. Enabling adultTeacher-librarians typically place the right book inthe right hands at the right time and encourage alifelong love of reading (Barlup, 1991). The role of theteacher librarian, connecting young people withbooks that interest them, has been underestimated. Haycock, Dr Ken (2003) The Crisis of Canadas School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Re-Investment, Association of Canadian Publishers. p. 27  Available at: http://www.publishers.ca
  20. 20. Reading environmentTo be successful there should be: –a large, varied collection of reading materials  –knowledgeable library staff who know both the collection and the students with whom the work –adequate access to reading materials both during structured reading programs and out of school hours – varied forms of reading materials in an array of reading ability levels 
  21. 21. Reading environmentTo be successful there should be: –modelling by staff of positive attitudes towards reading and their students as readers –whole school support for reading as a necessary part of life  –an encouraging, welcoming physical environment  –a sense of ownership by the students of their own reading development and their reading environment Next
  22. 22. Reading environmentIt should come as no surprise that if reading isvalued and promoted, young people will needinteresting and relevant material to read. Access tothese materials becomes critical. Further, the largerthe library collection, the larger the impact onreading and achievement. Haycock, Dr Ken (2003) The Crisis of Canadas School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Re-Investment, Association of Canadian Publishers. p. 28 Available at: http://www.publishers.ca Back
  23. 23. Reading environmentA good reading environment, including comfort andquiet, as well as larger library collections, affectreading, literacy development and reading scores. Haycock, Dr Ken (2003) The Crisis of Canadas School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Re-Investment, Association of Canadian Publishers. p. 28  Available at: http://www.publishers.ca Back
  24. 24. Reading environmentWhat is it that enabling adults, teachers especially,do? They provide, stimulate, demonstrate andrespond.They provide books and time to read them andan attractive environment where people want toread. They stimulate a desire to become athoughtful reader. They demonstrate byreading aloud and their own behaviour what a‘good’ reader does. And they respond, and helpothers respond, to the individuality of everyone inthe reading community they belong to. Chambers, A. (1991) The Reading Environment.  NSW: PETA, Thimble Press, p. 92. 
  25. 25. The enabling adult

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