Three initiatives and one opportunity Cambridge Technopole, University Enterprise Network, Cambridge Open Innovation Netwo...
University of Cambridge <ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>12,000 undergraduates </li></ul><ul><li>6,300 graduate student...
Institute for Manufacturing (IfM) <ul><li>230 staff, researchers and PhD students </li></ul><ul><li>142 MEng, MPhil and MS...
IfM approach EDUCATION RESEARCH Services GOVERNMENT INDUSTRY UNIVERSITIES
With thanks to Alan Barrell,  http://www.alanbarrell.com/
With thanks to Alan Barrell,  http://www.alanbarrell.com/
1 Limited
 
1 Limited
CDT / Sumitomo Chemical:  P-OLED Technology Ecosystem Source: CDT Ltd IP & Technology Centre Manufacturing Development Cen...
 
Cambridge Open Innovation Network (COIN)   <ul><li>Initially Unilever-funded, now 30 organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Ident...
 
What is the role of location for open innovation?
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Gvl Berkeley Cambridge University Minshall

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  • CDT provides a good example of a start-up company that has built its business around partnerships with larger companies. However, there are many challenges in setting up and managing such a partnership-based business model and these include: Size difference and proximity – There are some basic practical issues around bringing together a company with a few employees with one having tens of thousands. Who should you talk to in the larger company? How to deal with the fact that people frequently change roles within larger firms? Also, if the two companies are located at opposite sides of the world, this can lead to some real management problems. One quote from a start-up that had many problems working with a larger company reveals how this situation can feel: “We felt like s a small speedboat trying to dock with a supertanker”. Strategy and business models – Both sides of any partnership will have their own strategy and business models. Partnerships are formed when there is mutual strategic need. But strategies and business models tend to be dynamic. What happens when one partner’s strategy changes? Sector and organisational ‘clockspeed’ – Companies and industries have particular ‘clockspeeds’. For example, in business to business selling, the time between making first contact with a customer and receiving payment may be either a few days to several months (for aerospace, it may be years). If one company is used to operating at the short deal cycle end and the other at the long deal cycle end, this can cause practical cash flow problems. Resources and funding – Partnerships take a lot of time to make them work. For a small company with very few people, the proportion of time that they are devoting to making the partnership work can be very significant, and may lead to insufficient time being available for other management tasks. For the bigger firm, they may be able to devote substantial resource to making the partnership work. For the smaller firm, the partnership may be come so time consuming and distracting that it becomes harmful to the overall success of the business. Partnering capability – The ability to work with other firms has become a key skill for many high tech firms. The level of skill is often linked to amount of experience the companies have at managing partnerships, and whether lessons learned are converted into management practices. For a start-up, a good question to ask of a big firm is ‘Have you ever worked with a company small as ours?’
  • Gvl Berkeley Cambridge University Minshall

    1. 1. Three initiatives and one opportunity Cambridge Technopole, University Enterprise Network, Cambridge Open Innovation Network Dr Tim Minshall [email_address]
    2. 2. University of Cambridge <ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>12,000 undergraduates </li></ul><ul><li>6,300 graduate students </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Income US$ 398m </li></ul><ul><ul><li>8% from industry </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Commercialisation </li></ul><ul><li>US$ 14m licensing and consultancy income </li></ul><ul><li>68 spin-outs in portfolio </li></ul><ul><ul><li>US$ 5 0m raised since 09/2008 </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Institute for Manufacturing (IfM) <ul><li>230 staff, researchers and PhD students </li></ul><ul><li>142 MEng, MPhil and MSt students plus undergraduate management options </li></ul><ul><li>1,254 attendees at external courses </li></ul><ul><li>8 research centres addressing aspects of engineering, management and economics </li></ul><ul><li>External funding of over US$30m </li></ul><ul><li>Academic and industrial collaborators in 36 countries </li></ul><ul><li>Projects with 73 international companies </li></ul>To provide a leading international focus for education, research and practice for the manufacturing and related service industries
    4. 4. IfM approach EDUCATION RESEARCH Services GOVERNMENT INDUSTRY UNIVERSITIES
    5. 5. With thanks to Alan Barrell, http://www.alanbarrell.com/
    6. 6. With thanks to Alan Barrell, http://www.alanbarrell.com/
    7. 7. 1 Limited
    8. 9. 1 Limited
    9. 10. CDT / Sumitomo Chemical: P-OLED Technology Ecosystem Source: CDT Ltd IP & Technology Centre Manufacturing Development Centre PLED materials Polymer deposition Device physics Process equipment Manufacturing process Device electronics CDT Dow Chemical (USA) Covion (Germany) Sumitomo Chemical (Japan) Bayer (Germany) Melville Polymer Lab. (UK) Oxford University (UK) Litrex Corp. (USA) Toppan Printing (Japan) CDT Cavendish Lab. (UK) Tokki (Japan) Ulvac (Japan) OTB (NL) CDT Optics enhancement CDT Cavendish Lab. (UK) ST Microelectronics (France)
    10. 12. Cambridge Open Innovation Network (COIN) <ul><li>Initially Unilever-funded, now 30 organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies areas of common interest / opportunity </li></ul>
    11. 14. What is the role of location for open innovation?

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