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DR SURAJ CHAWLADEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE         PGIMS, ROHTAK
A PLAN A Plan is a deliberate attempt to spell out how the resources  of a country should be put to use. It has some gen...
Planning commission of India The Planning Commission was set up in March, 1950 by a  Resolution of the Government of Indi...
Review of the health system during the       previous (eleventh) Plan
 The 11th Plan had set six health outcome indicators as time-  bound „goals‟. These included lowering maternal and infan...
 Low public spending on health (1% of GDP), high out-of-  pocket payments (71%) leading to impoverishment, high  levels o...
 Equally worrying is the growing reliance on private  providers, which currently service 78% of outpatients and  60% of i...
 With a rising trend in non-communicable diseases, even as  we try to conquer conventional, communicable  diseases, India...
Health expenditure in India In the year 2008-2009 Total health expenditure was 4.1 % of  GDP. Public funds contributed on...
A Renewed Commitment to Public Health
 The Directive Principles of State Policy in the Constitution of  India mandate „improvement of public health‟ as one of ...
 Calling for the 12th Plan to be specially focused on health, the  Prime Minister promised that funds would not be a  con...
Goals for Health Systems in 12th Plan
Responsiveness of health systems is assessed by WHO on users‟perception of services on seven parameters, namelychoice, com...
Reduction of Infant Mortality Rate (IMR): At historical rate of decline, India is projected to have an IMR  of 38 by 2015...
Prevention and reduction of underweight children under 3years: Underweight children are at an increased risk of mortality...
Prevention and reduction of anemia among women aged 15-49years: Anemia, the underlying determinant of maternal mortality ...
Prevention and reduction of burden of diseases –Communicable, Non-Communicable (including mental illnesses)and injuries: ...
Principles and strategies recommended by steeringcommittee to build the health care delivery system
Follow Principle of Subsidiarity: The Principle of Subsidiarity demands that matters be  handled by the smallest, lowest ...
 This need can be operationalized through the instrument of  State specific Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), which  wou...
Illustrative List of Items for Inclusion in             MoUs with States
Illustrative List of Items for Inclusion in             MoUs with States
Target national health outcome goals: Every scheme or programme of the health sector should aim  to address at least one ...
Integrate vertical disease control programmes with NRHM: Integrated delivery of health services through a common   instit...
Centrally Sponsored Disease Control Programmes (Current Scenario)     As a part of NRHM                          Independe...
Universal and cashless access to an Essential Health Packageincluding Essential Medicines: It is time to move towards ass...
Address social determinants of health and convergence withpolicies and programmes of other ministries impacting health: T...
Perform Essential Public Health Functions: These are fundamental activities that monitor „determinants   of health‟ in or...
5. Development of policies as well as institutional capacities for    planning and management of public health;6. Strength...
Leverage strength of private sector, subject to strict checks andbalances: With 80% of doctors, 26% of nurses, 49% of bed...
Strong regulation of the health sector, covering PublicHealth, drugs, food, education and medical practice: States need t...
Promote research in national health outcomes: By competitively inviting proposals from all eligible research   agencies i...
Health Systems for the 12th Plan: An Overview
Universal Health Care (UHC)
Definition of UHC “Ensuring equitable access for all Indian residents in any part  of the country, regardless of income l...
 Inherent in the above definition is an assurance from the  Government to provide an EHP to every resident of the  countr...
Key features of the proposed UHC Universal Health Care (UHC) should be financed by Central  and State Governments on a 85...
Key features of the proposed UHC An Essential Health Package (EHP) covering out-patient  and in-patient healthcare should...
Key features of the proposed UHC Ambulatory care under the EHP should be paid using a  „Capitation Fee Model‟, whereby ea...
Convergence with ICDS
 Harmonization of ICDS and Health Blocks / reporting units  for aligning their activities, monitoring and supervision. Th...
 Ensuring effective and efficient operation of Village Health  and Nutrition Days in all areas with community monitoring....
Human Resources for Health
HRH estimates for Healthcare Services in Public Sector
Human Resources for HealthSkilled health workers: Our health system needs four basic categories of human   resource in su...
Human Resources for Health New categories of para-health workers, such as Physicians‟  Assistants and the Bachelor of Rur...
Human Resources for HealthPublic Health professionals and community-based workers: Public health workers, such as public ...
Human Resources for HealthExpansion of Medical, Public Health, Nursing and paramedicaleducation: The strengthening of exi...
Human Resources for Health Setting up 30 new medical colleges with public  financing, preferentially in States with large...
Human Resources for HealthNew category of mid-level health workers through a 3 yeartraining programme: This new category ...
Human Resources for HealthMandate Continuing Medical Education to retain license topractice: While science is rapidly exp...
Human Resources for Health The Working Group on NRHM has recommended one  Community Health Worker (CHW) per 1000 persons;...
Human Resources for Health Orienting medical education to the needs of society: The  curriculum for medical education nee...
Concerns on Health in union budget 2012
 Fund for health sector-Rs 30,477 compared to Rs 26,760  crore in 2011-2012(14% increase). Allocation to NRHM -Rs 20,822...
 Allocation for National Aids Control Organization (NACO)  remains same as that of last year-Rs 1,700 crore. Budget for ...
 Six Life Saving Drugs Exempted from Excise Duty -   1)raltegravir potassium for HIV   2)rotavirus vaccine   3)pneumococc...
 Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls,  SABLA - Rs750 crore allotted for 2012-13. The Pradhan Mantri ...
 Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) gets Rs 710  crore,as against Rs 610.85 crore in 2011-12. Prices of medicines...
References http://planningcommission.nic.in/sectors/index.php?sectors=he  alth planningcommission.nic.in/aboutus/committ...
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Health in 12th Five Year Plan - Dr. Suraj Chawla

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Health in 12th Five Year Plan

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Health in 12th Five Year Plan - Dr. Suraj Chawla

  1. 1. DR SURAJ CHAWLADEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE PGIMS, ROHTAK
  2. 2. A PLAN A Plan is a deliberate attempt to spell out how the resources of a country should be put to use. It has some general and specific goals, which are to be achieved within a specific period of time. The general goals of a Plan are growth, modernization, full employment, self-reliance and equity. But all Plans may not give equal importance to all of them. Each Plan can have some specific goals like improvement of agriculture. For example our first five-year plan was geared to improving the state of agriculture and the second to improving Industry.
  3. 3. Planning commission of India The Planning Commission was set up in March, 1950 by a Resolution of the Government of India. The economy of India is based on planning through its five- year plans, developed, executed and monitored by the Planning Commission . With the Prime Minister as the ex officia Chairman, the commission has a nominated Deputy Chairman, who has rank of a Cabinet minister. Sh. Montek Singh Ahluvaliya is currently the Deputy Chairman of the Commission. The eleventh plan is going to complete its term in March 2012 and the twelfth plan will start from April 2012.
  4. 4. Review of the health system during the previous (eleventh) Plan
  5. 5.  The 11th Plan had set six health outcome indicators as time- bound „goals‟. These included lowering maternal and infant mortality, malnutrition among children, anemia among women and girls, and fertility, and raising the child sex ratio. Though, there has been progress on all these fronts, except child sex ratio, the goals have not been fully met.
  6. 6.  Low public spending on health (1% of GDP), high out-of- pocket payments (71%) leading to impoverishment, high levels of anemia (56% among ever-married women aged 15- 45 years), high levels of malnutrition among children (wasting 22.9%, stunting 44.9%), high infant mortality (47/1000 live births) and maternal mortality (212 per 1 lakh live births). India trails in health outcomes behind its South Asian neighbours like Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, which have a comparable per capita income.Source: SRS Bulletin Dec. 2011, SRS MMR Bulletin 2011, NFHS-3, World HealthStatistics 2011
  7. 7.  Equally worrying is the growing reliance on private providers, which currently service 78% of outpatients and 60% of in-patients. For those who cannot afford private services, illness translates into high out-of-pocket expenditure as a proportion of total household expenditure, reaching catastrophic proportions at times (i.e. equal to or greater than 40% of a households non- subsistence income).
  8. 8.  With a rising trend in non-communicable diseases, even as we try to conquer conventional, communicable diseases, India is facing a dual burden of disease, presenting a difficult challenge to the health system. Meanwhile, the strategies for provision of inputs and creation of health infrastructure under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) have not yet fully translated into assured health care services for the people.
  9. 9. Health expenditure in India In the year 2008-2009 Total health expenditure was 4.1 % of GDP. Public funds contributed only 1.1% of GDP on health and rest 3.0% of GDP health expenditure was contributed by private sector. Per capita health expenditure in 2008-09 was 1904 rupees. (Source: National Health Accounts)
  10. 10. A Renewed Commitment to Public Health
  11. 11.  The Directive Principles of State Policy in the Constitution of India mandate „improvement of public health‟ as one of the primary duties of the State. The Central and State Governments have been taking proactive steps to promote health of the people by creating a network of public health care facilities, which provide free medical services, and also proactively control the spread of diseases. The Prime Minister in his Independence Day speech (2011) stressed upon the need to provide access to improved health services to all.
  12. 12.  Calling for the 12th Plan to be specially focused on health, the Prime Minister promised that funds would not be a constraint in the important areas of education and health. Government has decided to increase its total health expenditure to 2.5 per cent of GDP by the end of the 12th Plan. A high-level meeting chaired by Prime Minister also decided that the Planning Commission be requested to allocate adequate resources for the health sector to achieve the target, for which it could seek cooperation of the states.
  13. 13. Goals for Health Systems in 12th Plan
  14. 14. Responsiveness of health systems is assessed by WHO on users‟perception of services on seven parameters, namelychoice, communication, confidentiality, dignity, basicamenities, prompt attention and autonomy. Goals for 12th planare:Reduction of Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR): At historical rate of decline, India is projected to have an MMR of 149 by 2015 and 127 by 2017. An achievement of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of reducing MMR to 109 by 2015 would require a further acceleration of this historical rate of decline. At this accelerated rate of decline, the country can achieve an MMR of 75 by 2017.
  15. 15. Reduction of Infant Mortality Rate (IMR): At historical rate of decline, India is projected to have an IMR of 38 by 2015 and 34 by 2017. An achievement of the MDG of reducing IMR to 27 by 2015 would require an even further acceleration of this historical rate of decline. If this accelerated rate is sustained, the country can achieve an IMR of 19 by 2017. Reduction of Total Fertility Rate (TFR): India is on track for the achievement of a TFR target of 2.1 by 2017, which is necessary to achieve net replacement level of unity, and realize the long cherished goal of the National Health Policy, 1983 and National Population Policy of 2000.
  16. 16. Prevention and reduction of underweight children under 3years: Underweight children are at an increased risk of mortality and morbidity. At the current rate of decline, the prevalence of underweight children is expected to be 29% by 2015, and 27% by 2017. An achievement of the MDG of reducing undernourished children under 3 years to 26% by 2015 would require an acceleration of this historical rate of decline.
  17. 17. Prevention and reduction of anemia among women aged 15-49years: Anemia, the underlying determinant of maternal mortality and low birth weight, is preventable and treatable by a very simple intervention. The prevalence of anemia has shown a rising trend (58.8% in 2007, DLHS), which needs to be reversed and steeply reduced to 28%, which is half the current levels, by the end of the 12th Plan.Raising child sex ratio in the 0-6 year age group from 914 to935: Like anemia, child sex ratio is showing a deteriorating trend, and needs to be targeted for priority attention.
  18. 18. Prevention and reduction of burden of diseases –Communicable, Non-Communicable (including mental illnesses)and injuries: These add to the burden of disease, reduce longevity, add to health expenditure and are very amenable to public health and preventive measures. Targets for these conditions can be set by the MoHFW as robust systems are put in place to measure their burden.Reduction of households‟ out-of-pocket expenditure from 71%to 50% of total health care expenditure: Out-of-pocket expenditure on health care is a burden on families, particularly the poor ones.These need to be lowered to tolerable levels in the 12th Plan.
  19. 19. Principles and strategies recommended by steeringcommittee to build the health care delivery system
  20. 20. Follow Principle of Subsidiarity: The Principle of Subsidiarity demands that matters be handled by the smallest, lowest or least centralized competent authority. The Union Government should focus on regulations for food, drugs, medical profession, human resource in health, vital statistics and provide support to States and Local Bodies to discharge their roles. There is a need to provide a framework that allows flexibility at local levels within the national priorities for health, and which incorporates interventions in preventive public health.
  21. 21.  This need can be operationalized through the instrument of State specific Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), which would specify the roles and responsibilities of authorities at the national and State levels. Regarding human resource (HR), para-medical professionals and community health workers should be trained and equipped, and given greater authority and responsibility in managing patients‟ health.
  22. 22. Illustrative List of Items for Inclusion in MoUs with States
  23. 23. Illustrative List of Items for Inclusion in MoUs with States
  24. 24. Target national health outcome goals: Every scheme or programme of the health sector should aim to address at least one of the eight national health outcome goals, and the link between the two should be made explicit through measurable intermediate and final indicators. The accountability for outcomes should be defined a priori in location specific plans.
  25. 25. Integrate vertical disease control programmes with NRHM: Integrated delivery of health services through a common institutional set-up has the advantage of optimal utilization of funds and infrastructure; also access is made easy, and it facilitates a holistic approach to health and addresses multiple determinants of disease. In reality, however, most of the other 15 vertical disease control programmes are administered independent of NRHM, which is focused on Reproductive and Child Health. The 12th Plan prioritizes convergence among all the existing National Health Programmes under the NRHM umbrella.
  26. 26. Centrally Sponsored Disease Control Programmes (Current Scenario) As a part of NRHM Independent of NRHM ambit1. Vector Borne Disease Control Programme 7. National Program for Prevention and2. Tuberculosis Control Programme Control of Cancer, Diabetes,3. Leprosy Elimination Programme Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke4. Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control 8. Tobacco Control Programme Programme 9. Mental Health Programme5. Blindness Control Programme 10. Trauma Care Programme6. Drug-addiction Control Programme 11. Programme for Prevention of Burn injury 12. Health Care for the Elderly Under Department of AIDS Control 13. National AIDS Control Programme Pilot Projects 14. Sports Medicine 15. Deafness control 16. Leptospirosis control 17. Control of human rabies 18. Medical rehabilitation 19. Organ transplant 20. Oral health 21. Fluorosis control
  27. 27. Universal and cashless access to an Essential Health Packageincluding Essential Medicines: It is time to move towards assured provision of quality services in health care, in order to meet citizens‟ expectations and needs, bring in more accountability in healthcare delivery, and to lower out-of-pocket expenses on health.Build a Health Information System (HIS): The HIS should be both population and community based and should include „facility-based‟ information. It should link all service providers, laboratories and public health managers, so that it is able to provide information needed to monitor disease burden, and subsequently support decision-making and resource allocation.
  28. 28. Address social determinants of health and convergence withpolicies and programmes of other ministries impacting health: The MoHFW should become a stakeholder in every policy decision that has a potential impact on health. Conversely, MoHFW should proactively suggest policy options to other Ministries on matters that have a bearing on health.
  29. 29. Perform Essential Public Health Functions: These are fundamental activities that monitor „determinants of health‟ in order to protect the health of the population. These functions have an impact on citizens‟ lives and thus, the Government has a duty to ensure that these are carried out. The 11 Essential Public Health services which the Government must provide are:1. Monitoring, evaluation, and analysis of health status of populations;2. Public health surveillance, research and control of risks and threats to public health;3. Health promotion;4. Social participation in health;
  30. 30. 5. Development of policies as well as institutional capacities for planning and management of public health;6. Strengthening of institutional capacities for regulation and enforcement in public health;7. Evaluation and promotion of equitable access to necessary health services;8. Human resources development and training in public health;9. Quality assurance in personal and population-based health services;10. Research in public health; and11. Reducing the impact of emergencies and disasters on health.
  31. 31. Leverage strength of private sector, subject to strict checks andbalances: With 80% of doctors, 26% of nurses, 49% of beds and 78% of ambulatory services and 60% of in-patient care the private sector has to be partnered for health care delivery. It is recommended utilize private sector capacities via a „contracting-in‟ mechanism, even though within a strict regulatory framework.
  32. 32. Strong regulation of the health sector, covering PublicHealth, drugs, food, education and medical practice: States need to enact Public Health Acts so that their health machinery is empowered and may take on the responsibility of attending to public health and sanitation issues. As regards drugs, while the Essential Medicine list needs to be brought under price control mechanism. In the food sector, while the Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA) of 2006 is in place, the challenge is to translate it into better food regulation on the ground. With respect to medical practice, Government must mandate evidence based and cost-effective clinical protocols of care, which all providers must follow.
  33. 33. Promote research in national health outcomes: By competitively inviting proposals from all eligible research agencies in the country.Integration of AYUSH in teaching, research and practice: The goals of the 12th Plan can be realized only if the strengths of Indian Systems of Medicine and Homeopathy and the vast human resource of its practitioners are suitably trained and used. For this, integrated models of teaching, research and practice would need to be devised and implemented, and cross- referrals encouraged.
  34. 34. Health Systems for the 12th Plan: An Overview
  35. 35. Universal Health Care (UHC)
  36. 36. Definition of UHC “Ensuring equitable access for all Indian residents in any part of the country, regardless of income level, social status, gender, caste or religion, to affordable, accountable and appropriate, assured quality health services (promotive, preventive, curative and rehabilitative) as well as services addressing wider determinants of health delivered to individuals and populations, with the Government being the guarantor and enabler, although not necessarily the only provider, of health and related services.”
  37. 37.  Inherent in the above definition is an assurance from the Government to provide an EHP to every resident of the country in a cashless manner. Being directly responsible for provision of public health, and running of hospitals and dispensaries, State Governments would need to be supported by the Central Government in extending UHC to the entire population of the country by the end of the 12th Plan. Cashless and portable UHC should be piloted in one District in each State and UT during the first year of the 12th Plan, and gradually rolled out thereafter.
  38. 38. Key features of the proposed UHC Universal Health Care (UHC) should be financed by Central and State Governments on a 85:15 sharing basis. Central assistance should be made available to States after signing a MoU. Since NRHM already includes some beneficiary oriented components that overlap with UHC, a proportional re- allocation of NRHM outlay towards UHC should be done at the budgeting stage itself.
  39. 39. Key features of the proposed UHC An Essential Health Package (EHP) covering out-patient and in-patient healthcare should be provided as an entitlement to every family resident in the area. To begin with, core components of the EHP must include all the preventive, promotive, curative and rehabilitatory services in routine and emergency settings available under RCH and national health programmes. To focus on prevention, and to reduce out-of-pocket expenditure on ambulatory care, two-thirds of the EHP funding per family should be reserved for out-patient care, and the remaining for in-patient care.
  40. 40. Key features of the proposed UHC Ambulatory care under the EHP should be paid using a „Capitation Fee Model‟, whereby each provider receives a designated sum on a per family per annum basis. In case of in-patient care, the payment structure should be fee for service. Monitoring and Evaluation of financial and service management of the UHC should be developed and strengthened through real time data collection and a strong HIS. The UHC should be expanded in phases during the 12th Plan. Preparatory work for completing the list of beneficiaries for Districts to be covered in the second and subsequent years also needs to be simultaneously initiated in the first year itself.
  41. 41. Convergence with ICDS
  42. 42.  Harmonization of ICDS and Health Blocks / reporting units for aligning their activities, monitoring and supervision. This can be followed by dotted line responsibilities so that all nutrition related issues are also reported to „ICDS supervisors‟ and similarly to „health supervisors‟. The overall purpose is to determine performance accountability for individual outcome indicators. Roles of grass root workers (ASHA, AWW and ANM) and other functionaries at Block and sub-Block levels need to be clearly delineated. AWC should be the hub of convergent action for health and nutrition, and ASHA should use the AWC as the base for her outreach activities.
  43. 43.  Ensuring effective and efficient operation of Village Health and Nutrition Days in all areas with community monitoring. Maternal and child health cards (Joint ICDS NRHM Mother and Child Protection Cards) to be used as an important tool for Mother and Child cohort tracking, counselling for improved family care behaviour and improved utilization of key health and child care services, with convergence of activities and outcomes. Creating a direct reporting relationship between AWCs and Sub-Centres so that interventions are better synergized and resources are optimized.
  44. 44. Human Resources for Health
  45. 45. HRH estimates for Healthcare Services in Public Sector
  46. 46. Human Resources for HealthSkilled health workers: Our health system needs four basic categories of human resource in sufficient numbers and quality.Medical Graduates: Undergraduate teaching should aim to produce clinicians who can independently manage the case load in a primary care facility.Medical and Surgical Specialists: The discipline of Family Medicine should be introduced in all medical colleges so that qualified specialists in this discipline can effectively manage most of the medical problems encountered at the primary level, and referral to specialists occurs only when necessary.
  47. 47. Human Resources for Health New categories of para-health workers, such as Physicians‟ Assistants and the Bachelor of Rural Health Care (BRHC), nurse midwifery practitioner, multi-skilled health workers for peripheral institutions, physical therapists, mental health therapists, geriatric assistants, clinical psychologists, psychiatric nurses, occupational therapists and counselors need to be introduced. Directed investments in health sector can generate considerable employment in the 12th Plan.
  48. 48. Human Resources for HealthPublic Health professionals and community-based workers: Public health workers, such as public health nurses, inspectors, epidemiologists and laboratory technicians, and also community-based workers like ASHAs and AWWs need to be better trained.
  49. 49. Human Resources for HealthExpansion of Medical, Public Health, Nursing and paramedicaleducation: The strengthening of existing institutions, and also the creation of new ones, in terms of infrastructure and faculty, is required for training of new health workers and re-skilling of existing human resource. For this, a feasible and cost-effective option is to upgrade existing District hospitals and CHCs into knowledge centres, where medical and para-medical teaching and refresher courses can occur side-by-side with patient care.
  50. 50. Human Resources for Health Setting up 30 new medical colleges with public financing, preferentially in States with larger gaps. This step alone would increase Under-Graduate medical seats from 41,569 to 63,000 and Post-Graduate seats from 20,868 to 31,000. Strengthen State Government Medical Colleges and Central Government Health Institutions with the triple objective of increasing the intake of Under-Graduate and Post- Graduate candidates by 20,000 and 10,000 respectively, providing super-specialty and other specialized services for patient-care at these tertiary care centres.
  51. 51. Human Resources for HealthNew category of mid-level health workers through a 3 yeartraining programme: This new category of health-workers may be provided an integrated training in public health, modern system of Medicine and AYUSH as relevant to primary health care, over a three-year period after class XII. These workers can competently provide essential primary care in under-served settings, while at the same time, increasing the productivity of physicians by assisting them in the more well-resourced areas. The MoHFW and the Medical Council of India have recently expressed a preference for B.Sc. (Community Health) as the new qualifying degree programme instead of BRHC.
  52. 52. Human Resources for HealthMandate Continuing Medical Education to retain license topractice: While science is rapidly expanding, human memory is limited. This calls for periodic revision of knowledge, and making an effort to keep abreast with best practices in the discipline. While this is true of all disciplines, medical care needs greater caution, since human lives may be at stake. Hence, many countries have mandated Continuing Medical Education as a precondition to retain the license to practice. Similar efforts should be attempted in India.
  53. 53. Human Resources for Health The Working Group on NRHM has recommended one Community Health Worker (CHW) per 1000 persons; one male and one female health worker in every Sub-Centre, with a second female worker limited to only those Sub- Centres where midwifery (delivery) services are regularly provided. The Working Group has suggested that the Central Government fund one female worker and one male worker, as also the second female worker in Sub-Centres which are delivery points. If beyond this a second ANM is required, then the State Government should bear the cost.
  54. 54. Human Resources for Health Orienting medical education to the needs of society: The curriculum for medical education needs to be examined, so as to equip graduates to independently function as general practitioners. Medical curriculum should emphasize hands-on skills, while sensitizing the students to issues such as mental health, social determinants of health, essential medicines and generics, national health programmes, health informatics, medical ethics and equity. Public health as a discipline should be introduced in all medical colleges and opened to graduates from diverse background, such as AYUSH, or those from social and management sciences background.
  55. 55. Concerns on Health in union budget 2012
  56. 56.  Fund for health sector-Rs 30,477 compared to Rs 26,760 crore in 2011-2012(14% increase). Allocation to NRHM -Rs 20,822 crore (Rs 18,115 crore in 2011- 12). National Urban Health Mission launched to take care of health of urban people. Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Rs15,850 crore allotted, compared to Rs 10,000 crore in 2011-12.(58 % increase). Budget for rural drinking water and sanitation increased to 14,000 crore in 2012-13, from Rs 11,000 crore in 2011-12 (27 % increase).
  57. 57.  Allocation for National Aids Control Organization (NACO) remains same as that of last year-Rs 1,700 crore. Budget for some research institutes and hospitals AIIMS -Rs.1,022 crore. Safdarjung Hospital- Rs.467 crore as compared to Rs.345 crore last year. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital -Rs. 322 crore as compared to Rs.283 crore last year. Lady Hardinge Medical College-Rs. 223 crore as against Rs. 194 crore in the previous year. PGI Chandigarh-Rs.546 crore as against Rs.470 crore. No new case of polio was reported in the last one year. Rs.789 crore budget for the pulse polio program.
  58. 58.  Six Life Saving Drugs Exempted from Excise Duty - 1)raltegravir potassium for HIV 2)rotavirus vaccine 3)pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for thalassemia 4)posaconazole for life threatening fungal infection 5)temsirolimus for renal cell carcinoma 6)natalizumab for multiple sclerosis. The scope of ASHA‟s is enlarged. a) prevention of Iodine Deficiency Disorders. b)ensuring 100 per cent immunisation and c)better spacing of children. More active role is given to ASHA -as the convenor of VHSC and to support the initiative on malnutrition.
  59. 59.  Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls, SABLA - Rs750 crore allotted for 2012-13. The Pradhan Mantri Swasthya Suraksha Yojana (PMSSY)- setting up of AIIMS-like institutions and upgradation of existing Government medical colleges. Six such centres will be established in Patna (Bihar), Raipur (Chhattisgarh), Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh), Bhubaneswar (Odisha), Jodhpur (Rajasthan) and Rishikesh (Uttarakhand) in the first phase. Each hospital will have 960 beds and will provide undergraduate medical education to 100 students per year. Postgraduate and postdoctoral courses will also be offered. Concessional customs duty of 2.5% along with reduced excise duty of 6% on iodine. To support iodized salt in order to prevent iodine deficiency disorders
  60. 60.  Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) gets Rs 710 crore,as against Rs 610.85 crore in 2011-12. Prices of medicines may go up by 2-3 % due to increase in excise duty . Insurance - including life, health- will become expensive because of two percentage increase in service tax. Increase in the basic excise duty on cigarettes and bidis. Paan masala, gutkha, chewing tobacco, under compounded levy scheme. So they will be more expensive
  61. 61. References http://planningcommission.nic.in/sectors/index.php?sectors=he alth planningcommission.nic.in/aboutus/committee/strgrp12/st_he alth.pdf India RG, “SRS Bulletin Vol. 46, No. 1”, December 2011, http://www.censusindia.gov.in/vital_statistics/SRS_Bulleti ns/SRS Bulletin_ December 2011 .pdf. RG Census, India, “Special Bulletin on Maternal Mortality in India”, September 2007, http://www.censusindia.gov.in/vital_statistics/SRS_Bulle tins/Final-MMR%20Bulletin-2007-09_070711.pdf. http://health.india.com/diseases-conditions/union-budget- 2012-13-healthcare-sector-highlights/
  62. 62. Thank you

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