Hunar se rozgar in f & b service theory manual

2,966 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Travel, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,966
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
73
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hunar se rozgar in f & b service theory manual

  1. 1. IHM GWALIOR SUNIL KUMAR skihm86@yahoo.com 09996000499
  2. 2. IHM GWALIOR Skill Development Training Hunar Se Rozgar Trainers Package Waiter - Theory INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT , GWALIOR M.P. The National Council for Hotel Management A-34, Sector 62, NOIDA 201309 SUNIL KUMAR skihm86@yahoo.com 09996000499
  3. 3. IHM GWALIOR Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/1 Topic: Pride in the Nation: • India- A Unity in Diversity. • The largest democracy in the world. Page-1 • Boasts of a rich cultural heritage: beginning with the Harappan civilization, The Aryan civilizations of the North and the Dravidian settlements in the South, the influence of the Mauryas, The Guptas, Cholas and Pandyas of the south, the invaders who settled in India – the Mughals,followed by the British rule, the Goan occupation by the Portuguese, The French influence on Pondicherry have left India with unique : Ø Religious mix Ø Food habits Ø Dressing etiquettes Ø Varied celebration of festivals Ø Different dance and music forms etc • The world today, looks up to India as the frontrunner in IT, BT, as one of the strongest emerging economies in the world. SUNIL KUMAR skihm86@yahoo.com 09996000499
  4. 4. IHM GWALIOR • Industrialists from India are today aggressively acquiring huge multinational industries like Corus, Accelor, Jaguar and Landrover, etc • The Indian market is the focus of all industries the world over with India being widely recognized as one of the highest potential markets alongside China. • The Tourism industry is ever expanding in India. • The biggest strength of the country is its large young population (employable age group). • The biggest threat to the country comes from terrorism and dividing forces within. • Our strength lies in our unity, the stability of tenure and our diversity. • Be proud to be an Indian Key words: Unity in diversity A strong emerging economy Large employable youth Expanding industrial base like tourism 2 SUNIL KUMAR skihm86@yahoo.com 09996000499
  5. 5. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/2 Topic: Tourism & You: page 1 Ø Tourism has been positioned as one of the largest service industry in India. Ø It is an important industry for economic development, employment generation, particularly in the backward and remote areas. Ø India offers diverse opportunities for tourism, be it leisure or business. Ø India is likely to witness a huge increase in both domestic tourism and foreign tourism. Ø Tourism infrastructure includes Air, Rail, Road, Hotels, restaurants etc. Ø The demand for trained manpower in hotels and restaurants is bound to see huge rise in the near future. Ø According to WTO,tourism is concerned with pleasure, holidays, travel that make people leave their “normal” place of work and residence for a short- term temporary visit to another place. Ø WTO is World Tourism Organization based at Madrid, Spain. Ø International tourism, when the travel is from one country to another and Domestic tourism is travel within a native country. Ø International tourism consists of: Inbound tourism- refers to tourists entering a country and Outbound tourism – refers to tourists leaving their country of origin for another. Ø The primary constituents of tourism are: § Tra § Ac § Ca § Int • • • § Go inf Ø Th sec y con nts tou inc § Sh § Ha § Loc § To § Pu § Art wh
  6. 6. 3
  7. 7. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/2 Topic: Tourism & You: page-2 A tourism professional should be aware of all categories of tourist accommodation: They are: v Five star deluxe hotels-large hotels with high tariffs and extensive facility for the guests v Four , three and two star hotels ( referred sometimes as first class hotels)- Contain most facilities of the five star hotels but are not as exclusive in luxury. v Non- star hotels- Small non classified hotels , also referred to as budget hotels v Resorts and lodges-Almost exclusively meant for leisure tourists and usually enjoy seasonal business. v Tented camps- Set up in remote places , they are eco friendly and suit adventure tourism v Heritage hotels- Forts, palaces, havelis that have been converted into hotels without disturbing their old world charm
  8. 8. v Guest houses- Ideal for long stay guests on official visits v Alternative accommodation: which include all such forms of boarding facility besides the above mentioned which include: • Circuit houses • Dak bungalows • Dharamshalas • Paying guest accommodation Another important aspect of tourism infrastructure is the catering units which provide food and beverage to the tourists. These facilities include: v Fine dining restaurants attached to five star deluxe hotels- usually speciality restaurants which serve an exclusive fare. v Multi-cuisine restaurants attached to hotels or stand alone units which serve more than two different cuisines v Coffee shops- restaurants open round the clock which offer food and a large selection of beverages at affordable prices v Bars- Outlets that serve alcoholic beverages with some snacks v Fast food outlets- made popular by burger joints and the pizza houses they serve standardized food at affordable rates, the service being fast and informal. 4
  9. 9. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/2 Topic: Tourism & You: page-3 K ey W or ds : W T O In b o u n d to ur is m O ut b o u n d to ur is m v Cafeteria- Counter operations that cater to a large number of people in a relatively short period of time. Found in railway stations, bus depots etc v Road side Dhabas- Catering to the road commuters, they often serve traditional food without many frills and at highly affordable rates. v Food courts- set up in market places, malls, fairs etc serving a large choice of food and beverage under the same roof. C a f e t e r i a D h a b a F o o d c o u r
  10. 10. t Tourist accommodation Travel agency Tour operator Emporium Souvenir Tout Five star deluxe hotel Resorts and lodges Heritage hotel Fine dining restaurant Coffee shop Bar Fast food outlet 5
  11. 11. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/3 Topic: Etiquettes & Basic Conversation: page-1 Every member of the food service brigade plays a crucial role in ensuring high customer satisfaction and a good meal experience. The waiter, who is given the responsibility of actual service, has the additional responsibility of maintaining a high quality of service. To ensure high standards of delivery the waiting staff should have the following attributes: • Hygiene- personal aspects like taking a bath daily, keeping nails trimmed, cut hair, polished shoes, washing hands with soap. • Cleanliness- keeping the working environment clean. A waiter should keep his uniform, equipments and area clean and free of germs. Sanitising the area before the start of a shift • Speech and addressing: Clear speech and respectful addressing of customers helps a waiter to pass on an opinion of high standard to the customer, also reducing chances of miscommunication. • Courtesy: The waiter should always be amiable and soft-spoken with customers. • Memory: This helps the waiter to remember who is to be served what • Honesty: Food and beverage service involves handling a lot of money, valuables etc. Hence honesty towards the organization and
  12. 12. the customer is essential. • Co-operation: Good service comes out of teamwork. Helping others when one is free and being proactive helps deliver best standards to the customer. • Reliability: To be a good waiter one has to be reliable so that entrustment of responsibility and work happens. • Knowledge of food & beverage: Customers keep asking suggestions while ordering food. A good knowledge of food and beverage allows the waiter to satisfy guest query thereby adding value to the experience. • Knowledge of local area: Foreign tourists often engage in enquiring about the local area, access and routes with waiters. Helpful answers allow the guest to carry a positive image of the organization. 6
  13. 13. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/3 Topic: Etiquettes & Basic Conversation: page-2 • Punctuality: Being on time is extremely important in the service sector as planning, allocation of work and standardization of service all suffer if waiters turn up late on duty. • Complain handling: Very often waiters are exposed to guest complains first. An alert waiter can attend to a problem early and thereby diffuse a situation where as a delay may cause a snowballing effect and a severe complains. By informing a senior of likely complains and grievances waiters can handle situations better. It is evident that good communication skills are the very essence of human interaction and a good waiter should have good basic conversation skills.The following aspects help improve quality of conversation: Ø Volume of voice- Not too loud Ø Pace of voice- Modulated Ø Pitch of voice- Change the pitch according to the conversation giving impetus to important aspects of conversation Ø Enthusiasm- be interested and happy in
  14. 14. what you are doing Ø Listen well- Be patient and note down orders on a scribbling pad, repeat the order and confirm Ø Accept criticism- learn to accept criticism without being over defensive or over apologetic. Ø Always use appropriate salutation Ø Give way to the guests Ø Be polite and respectful at all times. Ø After presenting the bill , move away, do not solicit a tip Ø Remember to wish the customer well before he leaves and take a feedback of his experience. Key Words: Hygiene Speech Memory Courtesy Honesty Listening Punctuality Feedback 7
  15. 15. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-1 For a waiter one of the most important skill and knowledge requirement is the comprehension of different equipments, their use and identification. The following chart classifies the different types of equipment found in a good F&B Service department: Food and beverag e service equipm ents Silverw are crockery glassware linen furniture miscellaneous Tumbler Goblet Tableware Special equipments Cutlery flatware hollowware Silverware is synonymous with equipments used on the guest table for service and eating of food. Silver by itself is a soft metal and is hardened by addition
  16. 16. of copper and nickel. EPNS or electroplated nickel silver is a popular metal used for making F&B service equipments. Silver used on the table for guest use is called tableware. Tableware consists of: 8
  17. 17. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-2 Cutlery: All F & B service equipment used by guests on the table to cut food e.g.Joint knife, side knife, fish knife, butter knife, cheese knife etc.: Flatware: This consists of all the spoons and forks used by the guest to serve and to eat his food on the table except cutlery eg. teaspoon, coffee spoon, dessert fork, fish fork, pastry fork etc. Hollow Ware: These are silver equipment meant for carrying food and beverage from the kitchen to the guest table eg.water jugs, tea pots, coffee pot, sugar basin creamer, entrée dish platters etc. Although the term silver ware is still very popular, stainless steel has become a very popular substitute for making tableware and hollow ware today. Stainless steel is available in different alloys of chromium, nickel and steel. The advantages of steel table ware are: Ø It is more hardy than EPNS Ø It is lighter, hence easy to handle. Ø Does not need polishing Ø It is cheaper in cost.
  18. 18. 9
  19. 19. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-3 Standard Sizes Of Cutlery, Flatware nd Hollowware, Commonly Found In The F&B ‘S Department. S l. n o N a m e o f e q u i p m e n t Cutlery and flatware Size (in inches) Use 1 2 3 4 5 6
  20. 20. 7 8 9 Large knife Small knife Fish knife Butter knife Fruit knife Service spoon Dessert spoon Soup spoon Ice-cream spoon 9.5 8 8 5 7 10 7 7 5.5 To eat the main course To eat the side courses To eat fish dishes To cut and apply butter cubes To cut fruits To serve food and gravy To eat sweets and desserts To eat soup To eat ice cream 10 Tea spoon 11 Coffee spoon 12 Mustard spoon 13 Service fork 5.5 4.5 3 10 To stir sugar in a tea cup To stir sugar/milk in coffee To pick mustard from a mustard pot To serve food 10
  21. 21. 14 Large fork 15 Fish fork 16 Dessert fork 17 Cheese Knife Sl.No Hollowware 1 Tea pot 2 Coffee pot 3 Creamer 4 Water jugs 5 Entree’ dish oval 9.5 7.5 7 6 To eat the main course with the large knife Used along with the fish knife Used along with the dessert spoon To cut and serve cheese Capacity Uses ½ pot 300ml To serve tea as per different orders 1 pot 500ml 1 ½ pot 800ml ½ pot 300ml To serve coffee 1 pot 500 ml 40 ml for1/2 pot To serve milk 125 ml for 1 pot 300 ml for 1 ½ pot 1.1 Liters small To serve water 2.4 liters large 1 portion To carry portioned food from kitchen as 2 Portion per order 4 portion 11
  22. 22. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-5 Crockery: Vitreous, ironstone, vitrified are the three most commonly used hotel china though, stand alone outlets often used melanin as a cheaper and easy to handle alternative to crockery. Bone china is the most delicate and expensive earthenware found only in top end outlets. It is made of 25% china clay, 25% china stone and 50% animal bone and gets biscuit fired in a kiln to give its fine farm translucent finish. Standard Sizes Of Commonly Used Crockery Found In Food And Beverage Service Department. Sl.no. Name of the equip ment Crockery Size Diam eter Use 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Large plate Fish plate Soup plate Half plate Quarter plate Soup bowl Breakfast cup 10” 8” 9” 8” 6 ½”
  23. 23. Capacity 10 oz 10 oz To serve the main course dishes To serve the fish dishes To serve thick soups To serve the side course dishes As a side plate or underliner To serve soups To serve hot beverages during Breakfast 12
  24. 24. 8 9 Tea cup Coffee cup 6 2/3 oz 3 1/3 oz To serve tea other than at breakfast To serve coffee after lunch/dinner Glassware: Glasses are broadly of two types; a. Tumbler: It has two parts—a base and a body only b. Goblet: It has three main parts- the base, stem and bowl Glasses are mostly used for serving beverages like water, wine, alcohol etc; Standard Capacity Of Glassware Used In The Food And Beverage Service Industry Sl.No Name of glassware Capacity Use 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Hi-ball glass Juice glass Slim jim Collins Old fashione d Rolly Polly Beer tankard Pool glass Water goblet 8-9 oz 5 oz 10 oz 12 oz 8 oz 8 oz ½ pint, 1 pint, 2 pint 10 oz
  25. 25. 10 oz To serve water Servic e of juices- canne d Service of long drinks Service of long drinks/ cold coffee wit h I/C Whi sky on the roc ks Blo ody mar y serv ice Ser vice of draft and lager beer Service of drinks at the poolsid e Service of water 13
  26. 26. 10 11 12 13 14 White wine glass Red wine glass German white wine glass Champagne tulip Brandy balloon 5 1/2 oz 7 oz 5 oz 6-8 oz 8 oz Service of white wine Service of red wine Service of German white wine Service of champagne and champagne cocktails Service of brandy and flamed coffee 15 Champagne saucer 5 oz Service champagne, Short cocktails of Food and Beverage Service Linen Restaurant linen is very expensive and should be stored, laundered, and used with care. Linen used on tables should ideally have a fall of 12 inch or 1 foot on all sides. Commonly Used F & B (S) Linen of Standard Sizes Sl.no. Name of linen Size of linen Use 1
  27. 27. For a 3 ft squ are tabl e, a square table cloth 5 ft squar e For laying on a 3 ft square Table 14
  28. 28. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 For a rectangular table 4 1/2 ft x2 1/2ft For a round table of 3 ft diameter Slip cloths or napperon Waiter’s cloth Cocktail napkins Tea napkins Buffet cloth Buffet frills 6 ½ ft x4 ½ ft 5 ft diameter 3 ft x 3ft Damask or cotton size 24” x 24” 6-8”square 12”square Any length minimum being12 ft Cotton or satin of height 30-36” and length 12 ft or more For laying on the standard restaurant rectangular table For laying on a small restaurant round table To lay on top of the table cloth Used by waiters during service Small napkins used in bars Larger napkins used on the restaurant table Long table cloth used on the buffet counter Used to cover the front of buffet counters F& B Service Department: Furniture Choice of furniture in a full food and beverage service establishment is also dependent on the type of establishment, size and shape of area, budget, cuisine to be served and flexibility for multipurpose usage.
  29. 29. 15
  30. 30. Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-8 Furniture should ideally be good looking, trendy, durable and easy to clean. Stackable chairs are essential for banqueting whereas speciality restaurant need richly upholstered chairs. Tables come in different shapes. Other common furniture include the sideboard also known as a dummy waiter or a waiter’s console where spare cutlery, crockery, linen, extra saucers are stored. The hostess desk, buffet counter, gueridon trolley may also be included in furniture found in food and beverage outlet. Wooden furniture remains a favorite with F&B service management though wrought iron base, marble, granite tops, stainless steel base etc are also found. PVC is used in cheaper outlets, as they are less costly and easy to maintain. Standard Sizes of F&B (S) Department Furniture Restaurant chair: Height from ground to base Height from ground to top of back rest Size of base or seat Restaurant table: Square Square Rectangle Round Round Height of a table 18” 39” 18”x1 8” 2 ½ x 2 ½ ft for 2 persons
  31. 31. 3 ft x 3 ft for 4 persons 4 ½ ft x 2 ½ ft for 4 persons 3 ft diameter for 4 persons 5 ft diameter for 8 persons. 2 ½ ft or 30” 16
  32. 32. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: page-9 Miscellaneous Equipments: All such equipments used in the food and beverage service department which have not been covered under the above major equipment category are included in this category. This includes 1. Chopping board 2. Straw 3. Swizzle sticks 4. Cocktail umbrella 5. Bottle opener 6. Breadbasket 7. Fruit stand 8. Tea / coffee strainers 9. Chaffing dish 10. Tooth picks 11. Paper napkins 12. Doilley Although F&B (S) equipments have been discussed at length, all students of this trade have to become practically exposed to equipments and their use. Key Words: Silverware Flatware 17
  33. 33. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/4 Topic: Identification and use of tools and equipments: Cutlery Hollowware EPNS Bone China Goblet Tumbler Napperon Dummy waiter Swizzle Stick page-10 18
  34. 34. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/5 Topic: Techniques and principals of cleaning: page-1 Cleaning and care of equipment have to be repeatedly practiced by the students. Like the previous chapter this is a skill oriented module and a visit to a nearby hotel with requisite infrastructure helps the student to appreciate the process better. Ø Dish wash/care of equipment. 1. Understand how dirty plates are deposited in the dish wash area. 2. All dirties have to be scraped of dirty food and then deposited in the separate trays set aside for cutlery, racks for glasses and plates on the landing table. 3. Notice how the dish wash section cleans the plates, cutlery and glassware. 4. The equipment is allowed to drain on a landing area. 5. Pickup the equipment and take them to wiping area. Ø Plate Wiping. 1. Hold the plate completly covered in the wiping cloth. 2. Wipe it dry without allowing your palm to touch the plate. 3. Collect in stacks of 25. 4. Carry stacks and store them in the side board. 5. All crockery is stacked separately, however the soup bowls and cups may be stacked in lesser numbers (space permitting.) Ø Wiping glassware. 1. The glass is held in one corner of the wiping cloth usually with the left hand with a part
  35. 35. of the cloth below the base. 2. Stuff the other end of the cloth into the glass whilst still holding it. 3. Rotate the glass with right hand with the right thumb inside the glass but not touching the glass surface. 4. Place the wiped glass on a salver so that it can be carried to the sideboard. Ø Wiping cutlery and flatware. 1. Segregate the cutlery and flatware in to similar type. 2. Hold each item in your left hand with the wiping cloth below it. 19
  36. 36. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/5 Topic: Techniques and principals of cleaning: 3. Cover the item with the other part of the cloth and wipe it dry with the right hand. 4. Collect on a salver and carry back to the sideboard. Extra plates and table ware are stored in the plate room Ø Care of Linen: page-2 1. The clean linen is stored in ancillary linen room which may be attached to the pantry. 2. The spare linen in daily use is stored in the sideboard .Store linen well ironed, with the larger linen stacked at the bottom. 3. Dirty linen is deposited in a box kept just outside the exit door of the restaurant leading into the pantry. 4. These linen are counted, tied in bundled of ten/ twenty tied in a large bundle and exchanged in the main linen room. The exchange is done on the basis of CLEAN FOR DIRTY. For all equipment crockery, glassware, hollowware, flatware and linen a fortnightly count is undertaken to located breakage / loss of equipment if any. Ø Pick up Counter (i) Check how the food pickup is streamlined at the food pick up area (ii) List the activities at the abouyer’s desk
  37. 37. 20
  38. 38. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/5 Topic: Techniques and principals of cleaning: Ø The Silver room : page-3 (i) Silver is a delicate metal and needs polishing since it gets easily stained by sulphides in food. (ii) Silver cleaning is done by the following process (a) Wipe the silver item clean (b)Dip cotton in a silver cleaning liquid like proprietary silvo (c) Dab the cotton on the metal till the silver is lightly covered with a layer of silvo (d)Allow the metal to dry for 10 minutes (e) Buff it with waste cloth In large hotels since the silvo method works out to be expensive, industrial methods are used. These includes 1. The plate powder method 2. The silver dip method 3. The Burnishing machine 4. The Polivit method The plate powder is a pink powder which is made into a thick paste by mixing with ethyl alcohol. The paste is applied evenly on the silver. As the alcohol evaporates, Silver is buffed with a waste cloth.
  39. 39. The Silver dip is a proprietary liquid like Goddard’s silver dip The silver is dipped in the solution for a short time. The liquid reacts and cleans the stain. The silver is removed, washed in hot water and wiped clean. The burnishing machine is a large drum in which highly polished ball bearings are covered with hot soap water. As the drum rolls the silver inside the drum is cleaned by the friction of the ball bearings and soap water. The Polivit is a container with large aluminum sheet having holes in which washing soda solution is added. The action of aluminum and soda cleans the stains As mentioned at the beginning of the chapter, a hotel visit to a star hotel in the neighborhood with a silver cleaning machine would enhance student appreciation of the same. 21
  40. 40. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/5 Topic: Techniques and principals of cleaning: Key words: Dish wash CLEAN FOR DIRTY Abouyer’s desk The Silver room The plate powder method The silver dip method The Burnishing machine The Polivit method page-4 22
  41. 41. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/6 Topic: Personal Hygiene: page-1 Hygiene can be defined as the practice of keeping oneself and one’s surroundings clean in order to prevent disease or illness. As discussed earlier it is an important attribute of the waiting staff. Personal hygiene is important to all of us as individuals, but for the staff of the tourism industry, especially food handlers it is a basic necessity to maintain the highest levels of personal hygiene. Hence, employers and customers alike demand high standards of personal hygiene from the waiting staff brigade. The following are to be cultivated by all who wish to seek a career in the catering industry: § Have a bath daily, if need be twice a day. § Trim finger nails and toes regularly. § Wear a fresh set of clothes every day. Make sure your clothes are well tailored, clean, ironed properly and look elegant on you. § For men shave daily, if you keep a moustache, trim it regularly. § Avoid wearing finger rings. § Ladies should tie up their hair into a bun and cover it in a net. § Excess jewelry should be avoided. § Use a mild body freshener. § Do not bite fingernails. § Wiping perspiration, picking the nose, coughing in thepresense of the customer, scratching body parts are absolutely a no in the catering business. § Use hand sanitizers to wash your hands every two hours. § Wash your hands well with soap if you visit the toilet. Personal hygiene should be an inculcated habit. Hence grooming check forms a part of daily briefing
  42. 42. of staff prior to the beginning of a meal period. Key Words: Personal Hygiene Habit of cleanliness Grooming Disease Daily briefing Hand sanitizer 23
  43. 43. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/7 Topic: Food handling and Hygiene: Some definitions: page - 1 • Food: any substance, which we eat so as to maintain life and growth. • Contaminate: Make impure by exposing to a poisonous or polluting substance. • Spoilage: decay of food and other perishable goods. • Food poisoning: illness caused by food contaminated by bacteria or other harmful micro organisms. Every waiting staff should understand that food is highly perishable, especially cooked food. Improper storage, handling of food can easily lead to food poisoning. All catering students should realize the value of handling food properly to avoid spoilage which not only causes loss of revenue but also brings a bad name to the organization. The following points need to be taken care of: Ø Store cooked, semi- cooked and raw food separately Ø Store dairy products, meat, well refrigerated, vegetables- refrigerated mildly, whereas grocery at room temperature Ø Have separate cutting area for vegetables and meat, never use the same cutting or storing bowls. It is best to color code non veg. handling items and veg. handling items. Ø Sanitize hands every two hours to reduce microbial contamination through hands Ø Meat pre- preparation area should be ideally an air
  44. 44. conditioned room. Ø Wash the kitchen and pantry floor on a periodic basis to keep it clean and hygienic. Ø Send water and food samples to the microbiology lab for testing from time to time to ensure the storage cycle is effective Ø Ensure all food handlers wear caps to cover their heads. Ø Waiting staff should wear gloves while handling food directly/assembling the food Ø Food waiting to be picked up should be kept at a designated hot plate/cold counter and never left unattended Ø Check the expiry date of all packed food before use/sale Ø Puffed up cans should never be used. Ø Any food not smelling good should not be served. 24
  45. 45. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/7 Topic: Food Handling and Hygiene: Key Words: Food Contaminate Food poisoning Spoilage Perishable Bacteria Semi cooked food Dairy products Pre-preparation area Food assembly page - 2 25
  46. 46. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/8 Topic: Safety and precautions: The major safety concerns in catering establishments include: • Fire • Physical injury due to slips, falls, bruises and cuts • Burns and scalds • Terrorist activities Conditions Needed For A Fire page - 1 For a fire to take shape (as well as continue), the following three conditions should be met: 1. A combustible material 2. A specific temperature at which the above material would burn 3. Some fuel (mostly oxygen) to aid the burning Fire fighting is a very important aspect of a worker in the catering industry as the work environment has plenty of chances where the fire cycle may be completed. Compulsory fire fighting classes have to be conducted by any catering organization. A visit to a nearby hotel to explain fire fighting devices may be a good way to educate students about the importance of fire fighting. Classes Of Fire Let us also understand the classes of fires. • Class A These are fires that involve some solid material like, clothers, paper, junk-heap, wood etc. • Class B These are fires that involve liquid materials like: petrol, gasoline, diesel, oil etc. • Class C These are fires that involve electrical elements • Class D These are fires are those involve metals • Its important to know about the classes
  47. 47. of fires because fire-extinguishers are classified and marked based on the type of fire on which they would be effective 26
  48. 48. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/8 Topic: Safety and precautions: Types Of Fire Extinguishers • Water Based - These are most effective on Class A fires. • Foam Based - These are used mostly on Class B fires. It can also be used on Class A fires. • CO2 Based - These are mostly used on Class C fires. It can also be used on Class A and Class B fires. • CFC Based - These are mostly used on Class C fires. It can also be used on Class A and Class B fires. page - 2 • Dry Chemical Based These are most commonly used type of extinguishers. It can be used on Class A, B and C fire. Hence, its popular ly also called as ABC type. Physical injury: Accidents like falls, slips, bruises, cuts etc are very common in the F&B trade. Sometimes they may be major accidents like falls, fracture deep gashes etc to the staff working in the kitchen. In most of these cases well trained first aid handlers can reduce major complications to a large extent. However facilities like Doctor on call, medical insurance of all staff, and reduction of reaction time in getting medical attention reach the patients saves complications and life in a majority of cases. Bomb threat & Terrorist Activities: Terrorist activities were traditionally not considered as disasters. However, during the last few years, terrorist activities have become more sophisticated and F&B establishments have been targeted
  49. 49. regularly making sensitization to such activities for staff a very important part of disaster management.Generally, large scale terrorist activities can be prevented only through timely collection and analysis of “intelligence” data The only precaution that general population can take is to remain observant of their surroundings, and, report any suspicious activity to the law-enforcement agency. Heeding to alerts from the law enforcement agencies and scrupulously checking credentials of all employees, passport details of foreign guests, installing technology like luggage screeners, walk through detectors, under body checking glass for vehicles. Restricted entry with barricades for vehicles coming into a hotel premise, strict enforcement of gate passes to allow only authorized movement within the establishment, and installing CCTV at critical traffic movement points all help reduce the risk of terrorist activities within a hotel or restaurant. 27
  50. 50. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/9 page - 1 Topic: Food and beverage terminology: Ø Food: any substance, which we eat so as to maintain life and growth Ø Fine dining restaurants: attached to five star deluxe hotels- usually speciality restaurants which serve an exclusive fare. Ø Multi-cuisine restaurants: attached to hotels or stand alone units which serve more than two different cuisines Ø Coffee shops: restaurants open round the clock which offer food and a large selection of beverages at affordable prices Ø Bars: Outlets that serve alcoholic beverages with some snacks Ø Fast food outlets: made popular by burger joints and the pizza houses they serve standardized food at affordable rates, the service being fast and informal. Ø Cafeteria: Counter operations that cater to a large number of people in a relatively short period of time. Found in railway stations, bus depots etc Ø Road side Dhabas: Catering to the road commuters, they often serve traditional food without many frills and at highly affordable rates. Ø Food courts: set up in market places, malls, fairs etc serving a large choice of food and beverage under the same roof. Ø Cutlery: All F & B service equipment used by guests on the table to cut food e.g. Joint knife, sideknife, fish knife, butter knife, cheese
  51. 51. knife etc.: Ø Flatware:This consists of all the spoons and forks used by the guest to serve and to eat his food on the table except cutlery eg. teaspoon, coffee spoon, dessert fork, fish fork, pastry fork etc. Ø Hollow Ware: These are silver equipment meant for carrying food and beverage from the kitchen to the guest table eg.water jugs, tea pots, coffee pot, sugar basin creamer, entrée dish platters etc. Ø EPNS: Electro plated nickel silver: Metal used to make the best cutlery, flatware and hollowware. Ø Tumbler: A glass having a base and a bowl only. Ø Goblet: A glass having a base , a bowl and a stem. Ø Slip cloths or napperon: Laid on top of the table cloth to protect it from spills and also to give a better design. Ø Dummy waiter : a waiter’s console where spare cutlery, crockery, linen, extra saucers are stored 28
  52. 52. Waiter Course (Six weeks): Theory Component Lesson Plan No: TM/9 Topic: Food and beverage terminology: Ø Special silver cleaning methods: The plate powder method The silver dip method The Burnishing machine The Polivit method page - 2 Ø Food poisoning: illness caused by food contaminated by bacteria or other harmful micro organisms 29
  53. 53. REFERENCES AND FURTHER READINGS : 1. Modern Restaurant Service : JOHN FULLER, Hutchison. 2. Mastering Restaurant Services : H.L CRACKNELL and G.NOBIS, Macmillan. 3. Food and Beverage : DENNIS LILLICRAPAND JOHN COUSINS, Hodder & Stoughton. 4. Improving Food and beverage performance : KEITHWALLER, Butterworth- Heinemann. 5. Bar and Beverage Book : KOSTAGIS, THOMAS AND PORTER,John wiley. 6. Food & Beverage service : BRUCE AXLER, CAROL LITRIDES , John wiley and Sons. 7. Text Book of F&B Service : SN BAGCHI , ANITA SHARMA , Aman Publications. 8. Food & Beverage Service : VIJAY DHAWAN. 30

×