3D Printing

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3D Printing Technology In Detail

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3D Printing

  1. 1. WELCOME
  2. 2. 3D PRINTING PRESENTED BY: SUNDEEP SOMAN S6C NO:42 CAS TDPA
  3. 3. THE SEMINAR INCLUDES *WHAT IS 3D PRINTING *HOW 3D PRINTER WORKS *HISTORY OF 3DPRINTING *3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES *COMPARISON OF 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES *BENEFITS OF 3D PRINTING *APPLICATIONS *SUCCESSIVE STORIES *CONCLUSION
  4. 4. WHAT IS 3D PRINTING? 3D + PRINTING = 3D PRINTING  IT IS A RAPID PROTOTPYING TECHNOLOGY-A GROUP OF TECHNOLOGIES USED TO QUICKLY FABRICATE A SCALE MODEL OF PHYSICAL PART  IT CREATES PHYSICAL MODELS FROM CAD & OTHER DIGITAL DATA-LAYER BY LAYER  IT IS WIDELY USED,ESPECIALLY IN PRODUCT DESIGNING  IT REDUCES A LOT OF TIME & COST  IT IS A DEVELOPING TECHNOLOGY
  5. 5. HOW 3D PRINTER WORKS?
  6. 6. History of 3d Printing 3D Printing was developed by Charles Hull in 1984 Mr. Hull, born May 12, 1939, was an inventor of over 60 U.S. patents in the fields of ion optics and rapid prototyping. Mr. Hull’s patent for the “Apparatus for Production of Three-Dimensional Objects by stereo lithography”, issued on March 11, 1986, defined stereo lithography as a method and apparatus for making solid objects by successively “printing” thin layers of the ultraviolet curable material one on top of the other. After obtaining the patent, In 1986 Mr. Hull founded “3D Systems” and developed the first commercial 3D Printing machine. However the term “3D Printer” was not used by that time and the machine was called only as Stereolithography Apparatus In 1988, 3D Systems delivered its first version of the machine, named SLA-250, to the public
  7. 7. HISTORY CONTINUES While Stereolithography systems had become popular by the end of 1980s, other similar technologies such as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) were introduced. FDM was invented in 1988 by Scott Crump who founded ”Stratasys” in the next year to commercialize the technology In 1993, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) patented another technology, named “3 Dimensional Printing techniques” (3DP), which is similar to the inkjet technology used in 2D printers In 1995, Z Corporation obtained an exclusive license from MIT to use the technology and started developing 3D Printers based on 3DP technology In 1996, three major products, “Genisys” from Stratasys, “Actua 2100″ from 3D Systems and “Z402″ from Z Corporation, were introduced. It was only during this period, the term “3D Printer” was first used to refer rapid prototyping machines In 2005, the Spectrum Z510, was the first high definition color 3D Printer in the market, launched.
  8. 8. HISTORY CONTINUES In 2006, a breakthrough open source printing project, named “Reprap”, was developed in England. The rep-rap was capable of manufacturing various plastic parts, roughly 50% of itself In 2008, the first version of the Reprap, the “Darwin”, was released. In continued development of Reprap printers the next model developed was the “Mendel” In 2010 the first 3D printer was introduced that could produce functional prototype parts
  9. 9. Charles Hull next to one of his 3D printers, the SLA7000
  10. 10. 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGIES Stereo Lithography Apparatus (SLA) Selective laser Sintering (SLS) Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)
  11. 11. Stereo Lithography Apparatus (SLA)  The first Rapid Prototyping technique and still the most widely used Inexpensive compared to other techniques Uses a light-sensitive liquid polymer  Requires post-curing since laser is not of high enough power to completely cure  Long-term curing can lead to warping Parts are quite brittle and have a tacky surface Support structures are typically required
  12. 12. ARCHITECTURE
  13. 13. S-L-A PRINTED PRODUCTS
  14. 14. Selective laser Sintering (SLS) Patented in 1989 Considerably stronger than SLA; sometimes structurally functional parts are possible Laser beam selectively fuses powder materials: nylon, elastomer, and metal Advantage over SLA: Variety of materials and ability to approximate common engineering plastic materials SLS creates accurate and durable parts but finish out of machine is relatively poor
  15. 15. ARCHITECTURE LASER
  16. 16. S-L-S PRINTED PRODUCTS An air flow system Gaudi Stool Designed by Antonio Gaudi
  17. 17. Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) Standard engineering thermoplastics, such as ABS, can be used to produce structurally functional models Filament of heated thermoplastic polymer is squeezed out like toothpaste from a tube  Thermoplastic is cooled rapidly since the platform is maintained at a lower temperature Make rapid progress in past few years and be used widely
  18. 18. ARCHITECTURE
  19. 19. F-D-M PRINTED PRODUCTS A Toy A door handle
  20. 20. 3D printing-a comparison table Thermo plastics
  21. 21. Benefits of 3D Printing Cheap Manufacturing Quick Production Less waste Better quality Accessibility Sustainability New shapes and structures Win Business
  22. 22. SOME 3D PRINTERS The New Z Printer 850 by 3D Systems 3D Systems-Projet-5000
  23. 23. 3D PRINTING APPLICATIONS Engineering Architecture Architecture
  24. 24. Advertising &Marketing Education
  25. 25. Healthcare Archaeology and paleontology
  26. 26. Amours & Weaponry ‘Home Printed’ Food
  27. 27. Custom 3D Print… Anything Jewellery
  28. 28. Successive stories of 3D printing Nokia encourages Lumia owners to print their own phone cases
  29. 29. 3D PRINTED PLANE
  30. 30. 3D PRINTED EYE WEARS
  31. 31. 3D PRINTED FORMULA 1 CARS
  32. 32. ALLOY FUEL DOOR FOR GENERAL MOTOR’S HUMMER H2 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE
  33. 33. FIRST EVER 3D PRINTED CAR
  34. 34. CONCLUSION NOTHING COMMUNICATES DESIGN IDEAS FASTER THAN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL PART OR MODEL. WITH A 3D PRINTER YOU CAN BRING CAD FILES AND DESIGN IDEAS TO LIFE – RIGHT FROM YOUR DESKTOP. TEST FORM, FIT AND FUNCTION – AND AS MANY DESIGN ITERATIONS AS YOU LIKE – WITH FUNCTIONAL PARTS.
  35. 35. QUESTIONS ???
  36. 36. THANK YOU

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