Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding & Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers Earl Kelly, Parent Involvement Coordinator Brad Norm...
Facts About  Father Involvement <ul><li>Studies have found that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>63% of black children, 35% of Hispa...
Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>Children with unmarried parents are three times more likely to be living below the ...
Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>According to a 1996 HHS report, children in single parent homes had: </li></ul><ul>...
Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>Youth from father-absent homes  </li></ul><ul><li>are more likely to experience: </...
Benefits of Father Presence <ul><li>A review of nearly 100 studies on parent-child relationships found that  the child’s r...
Connecting <ul><li>Stand up, find a partner, stand face to face </li></ul><ul><li>You will each have 30 seconds </li></ul>...
Marginalization <ul><li>Cultural patterns and beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-natal focus on mothers, daytime appts </li></u...
One dad’s story
If absent, where are they? <ul><li>Unknown? </li></ul><ul><li>Haven’t been involved for a long time, lack contact informat...
Incarcerated Fathers <ul><li>Show video </li></ul><ul><li>Assumptions about incarcerated mothers and fathers </li></ul><ul...
Father Search & Engagement <ul><li>Check the files, especially earliest ones </li></ul><ul><li>Ask the child </li></ul><ul...
Strategies for Engagement <ul><li>Understand professional and personal biases </li></ul><ul><li>Set program expectations t...
Range of Connections <ul><li>Information about the family history and extended family members </li></ul><ul><li>Phone cont...
Agency/Staff Assessment Tool <ul><li>Leadership and Organizational Philosophy </li></ul><ul><li>Parent-involvement Program...
Resources <ul><li>Fatherhood Initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www. fatherhood .org/   </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Family Partne...
Thank You! <ul><li>Earl Kelly </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Brad Norman </li></ul><ul><ul><...
Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding & Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers Earl Kelly, Parent Involvement Coordinator Brad Norm...
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Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding and Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers

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Presentation given to California Mental Health Advocates for Children and Youth

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Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding and Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers

  1. 1. Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding & Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers Earl Kelly, Parent Involvement Coordinator Brad Norman, LCSW Gerry Rodriguez, Ph.D.
  2. 2. Facts About Father Involvement <ul><li>Studies have found that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>63% of black children, 35% of Hispanic children and 28% of white children do not live with their biological father </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 1997, 65% of poor children did not live with their biological fathers, compared to 25% of children who were not poor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20% of all non-resident fathers are believed to earn less than $6,000 a year. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[From: Father Facts, National Fatherhood Initiative (2007)] </li></ul>
  3. 3. Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>Children with unmarried parents are three times more likely to be living below the poverty line </li></ul><ul><li>A child with a biological mother and her unmarried partner have the highest odds of being below the poverty line </li></ul><ul><li>Thirty-eight percent of the children in this living arrangement are poor. </li></ul><ul><li>Kreider, Rose M. and Jason Fields. Living Arrangements of Children: 2001 . Current Population Studies, P70-104. Table 2. Washington DC: US Census Bureau, 2005. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>According to a 1996 HHS report, children in single parent homes had: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a 77% greater risk of being physically abused; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an 87% greater risk of experiencing physical neglect; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a 74% greater risk of emotional neglect; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an 80% greater risk of serious injury from abuse. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[From: Father Facts, National Fatherhood Initiative (2007)] </li></ul>
  5. 5. Consequences of Father Absence <ul><li>Youth from father-absent homes </li></ul><ul><li>are more likely to experience: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Poverty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emotional and behavioral problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Substance abuse issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incarceration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problems at school (e.g., repeating a grade, dropping out, poor performance). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[From: Father Facts, National Fatherhood Initiative (2007)] </li></ul>
  6. 6. Benefits of Father Presence <ul><li>A review of nearly 100 studies on parent-child relationships found that the child’s relationship with his/her father was equal or more important than the relationship with his/her mother for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Happiness, well-being and social and academic success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Predicting a child’s emotional instability, lack of self-esteem depression, social withdrawal and level of aggression (based on parental withdrawal) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delinquency, conduct problems, substance abuse and overall mental health and well-being. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[From: Father Facts, National Fatherhood Initiative (2007)] </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Connecting <ul><li>Stand up, find a partner, stand face to face </li></ul><ul><li>You will each have 30 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges to locating fathers in your work with families and children </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges to engaging fathers in your work with families and children </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies that have been successful </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits of engaging fathers </li></ul><ul><li>Back to my seat. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Marginalization <ul><li>Cultural patterns and beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-natal focus on mothers, daytime appts </li></ul><ul><li>Pediatric focus on mothers, daytime appts </li></ul><ul><li>Preschool focus on mothers, daytime activities </li></ul><ul><li>Education system </li></ul><ul><li>Child Welfare system: maternal relatives </li></ul><ul><li>Mental Health system: child focus (identified patient), mother often represents both parents. </li></ul>
  9. 9. One dad’s story
  10. 10. If absent, where are they? <ul><li>Unknown? </li></ul><ul><li>Haven’t been involved for a long time, lack contact information </li></ul><ul><li>Deemed “undesirable influence” </li></ul><ul><li>Court Orders prohibit parent/child contact </li></ul><ul><li>Avoiding arrest: back child support, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Incarcerated. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Incarcerated Fathers <ul><li>Show video </li></ul><ul><li>Assumptions about incarcerated mothers and fathers </li></ul><ul><li>Assumptions about the extended family members of incarcerated fathers </li></ul><ul><li>How difficult is it to locate incarcerated fathers? Not at all </li></ul><ul><li>Who will initiate contact?. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Father Search & Engagement <ul><li>Check the files, especially earliest ones </li></ul><ul><li>Ask the child </li></ul><ul><li>Internet searching </li></ul><ul><li>Find one relative, you can find most </li></ul><ul><li>Average American child has 150-300 living relatives </li></ul><ul><li>Should loss of access to father equal loss of his entire side of the family?. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Strategies for Engagement <ul><li>Understand professional and personal biases </li></ul><ul><li>Set program expectations to engage fathers consistently and persistently </li></ul><ul><li>Father-friendly environment—Assessment Tool </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate differently </li></ul><ul><li>Activities specifically for fathers and sons, fathers and daughters </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize and address cultural issues related to fatherhood. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Range of Connections <ul><li>Information about the family history and extended family members </li></ul><ul><li>Phone contact, texting, email </li></ul><ul><li>Visits, shared activities </li></ul><ul><li>Permanent adult connection </li></ul><ul><li>Potential placement with father or father’s family. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Agency/Staff Assessment Tool <ul><li>Leadership and Organizational Philosophy </li></ul><ul><li>Parent-involvement Program </li></ul><ul><li>Program Physical Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Staff Training and Professional Development </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration and Organizational Networking </li></ul><ul><li>Community Outreach. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Resources <ul><li>Fatherhood Initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www. fatherhood .org/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Family Partnership Institute, EMQ FamiliesFirst </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www. emq-fpi .org </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Federal Health and Human Services Agency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://fatherhood.hhs.gov/ </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Thank You! <ul><li>Earl Kelly </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Brad Norman </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gerry Rodriguez </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Who Loves Ya Baby: Finding & Engaging Absent and Marginalized Fathers Earl Kelly, Parent Involvement Coordinator Brad Norman, LCSW Gerry Rodriguez, Ph.D.

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