Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Students First 2020 - Creating a comprehensive student support ecosystem

160 views

Published on

As we continue this year's online Symposium series, we were joined by Professor Angela Hill, DVC Education at ECU and Professor Rowena Harper, Director, Centre for Learning and Teaching at ECU, who generously shared Edith Cowan's in-depth and dedicated approach to student support.

Session Chair: Prof Judyth Sachs, Chief Academic Officer, Studiosity

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Students First 2020 - Creating a comprehensive student support ecosystem

  1. 1. Creating a comprehensive student support ecosystem Professor Angela Hill, DVC Education, ECU Professor Rowena Harper, Director, Centre for Learning and Teaching, ECU Session Chair: Prof Judyth Sachs, Chief Academic Officer, Studiosity Students First: Studiosity Symposium 2020
  2. 2. Acknowledgement of Country Joondalup Mount Lawley Bunbury Perth Western Australia ECU Western Australian Campuses
  3. 3. • Edith Cowan University recognises the achievements of a remarkable Western Australian woman, Edith Dirksey Cowan. • Edith Cowan OBE believed that education was fundamental to tackling the social issues of the day, and that it was the key to growth, change and improvement. Her tireless work influenced the course of education in Australia, paving the way for many people to access education they could only previously dream of. • In 1921, Edith Cowan was the first woman elected to an Australian Parliament. She was also instrumental in Western Australian women obtaining voting rights and expanding access to education, and many professions, to females. • Edith Cowan’s portrait is in the Western Australian Art Gallery and also adorns the Australian $50 note. WHO WAS EDITH COWAN?
  4. 4. ECU AT A GLANCE
  5. 5. ECU: A values led University ECU’S VALUES • Integrity – being ethical, honest and fair • Respect – considering the opinions and values of others • Rational inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning • Personal excellence – demonstrating the highest personal and professional standards
  6. 6. Values Partnership Intentionality Impact Conceptualising the ecosystem
  7. 7. Whole of institution blueprints to focus on student success
  8. 8. Student Success: Intentional, strength based, whole of institution approach
  9. 9. What is policy for? ‘’equity-oriented scholars use a moral and social justice argument— either alone or in conjunction with a pragmatic argument—about the need to marshal ideas and resources to improve achievement and outcomes for all and particularly for underserved students “(Olivia & Nora, 2004 p.117) ECU policy development process • Benchmarking widely • Academic Policy Working Group design • Student Guild input and review • Expert review • Education Committee Policy and governance: intentional partnerships https://www.teqsa.gov.au/latest-news/publications/guidance-note-academic-governance
  10. 10. Whole-of-institution approach example: High Fail Units Action domains for supporting and enhancing student succes and retention at ECU Evidence-based Whole of institution approach 3.3 Adopt an evidence-based approach to the review and enhancement of courses and units supported through productive partnerships between academic and professional staff.
  11. 11. High Fail Unit Program Sample actions taken • School-based professional development on assessment design and moderation; • Review of Blackboard sites and the design and implementation of a new Blackboard template detailing minimum requirements for all units; • First Year Unit Health Check applied to all first year units with follow-up actions detailed in comprehensive reviews; • Review and redesign of assessment regimes, including the design of early assessment tasks; • Learning support embedded in targeted units around assessment tasks, including in classroom writing or numeracy activities and additional learning support sessions; • Units selected to engage in PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions).
  12. 12. Personnel: Intentional internal networks Network theory applied in an academic environment provides an opportunity to understand communication pathways where meaning is negotiated. Through these pathways culture is constructed, maintained and possibly changed (Roxa, T., Martensson, K., Alveteg, M., 2010, p. 101)
  13. 13. Structured approach to evaluation Logic models aim at articulating a particular social intervention's theory of change, or the relationship between the intervention's resource investments, activities, outputs and outcomes that produces social change (Price, Alkema, & Frank, 2009). Systematic data collection: • Student ID – who used program (demographic data) + demand overall, • Unit enrollment • Student Success (Pass rates) • Weighted Average Mark (WAM) • Retention For all programs we consider: 1. Resources allocated 2. Who used the program? 3. What difference did the program make? 4. Was it the difference intended? 5. Who benefited? 6. Who is absent? Evaluating impact Reported to Education Committee Our focus currently is on USAGE, CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT CORRELATION AND NOT CAUSATION
  14. 14. TEQSA found that Edith Cowan University has demonstrated: • a strong focus on student achievement which includes plans for well-targeted support appropriate to the varying needs of its students • a comprehensive policy framework for assuring academic and research quality and integrity as indicated in the extensive use of benchmarking in the course review, accreditation and re-accreditation policies and procedures and the use of external academic input into the University's academic quality reviews which will provide a strong foundation for achieving positive student outcomes • strong achievement in the provision of a high quality educational experience, and increasing strength in research performance. Our approach acknowledged during our re-registration process
  15. 15. Exploring the ecosystem: Learning Support Insert chosen ecosystem diagram
  16. 16. Develop an additional focus on retention strategies…including peer mentoring (Action 2.2) Support students to develop the language and professional communication skills necessary for careers in a range of professions and locations (Action 12.3) Learning Support: Plan Normalise the use of key student support services (Action 3.1) Adopt an evidence-based approach to the review and enhancement of courses and units supported through partnerships between academic and professional staff (Action 3.3) Expand student and peer-led study assistance programs (Action 4.4) Embed the development of oral and written communication in curriculum (Action 4.5) In partnership with students…support and promote students’ use of all core learning technologies (Action 2.1) Provide varied opportunities for diverse students to access learning technologies and appropriate devices (Action 2.3) Expand and coordinate support for off campus students through online and expanded-hours services with dedicated staff (Action 2.4)
  17. 17. Assessment Policy and Procedures The University is committed to assessment practices that enhance students’ global competitiveness by embedding communication and generic skills within key tasks (4.2 a) A variety of Assessment Types appropriate to the discipline must be used across a Course, including Assessment Types that assess written and oral communication (3.6) Curriculum Design Policy and Procedures Curriculum Design will be developed in a collaborative environment (4.1), and contextualise and embed generic skills, including communication, teamwork and self- management, problem-solving and critical thinking across the course (4.9). Each course will specify entry and exit standards for English Language Proficiency. All commencing students will undertake a diagnostic assessment of relevant communication skills in consultation with the Post-entry Language Assessment (PELA) Adviser Course Coordinators will designate summative assessment tasks throughout the course which act as milestones to assure communication skills development, and actively collaborate in the Learning Support: Policy interventions for students who are not able to meet these milestones Academic Teaching Staff will be supported by the Centre for Learning and Teaching to systematically and explicitly teach and assess communication skills across the course.
  18. 18. Senior Learning Advisors Librarians Learning Advisors PASS Leaders Aboriginal Tuition Mentoring Program Peer Advisors & VEEPS PELA Advisor Academic Integrity Coordinator HDR Advisors Academic Integrity Coordinator Learning Support: Personnel Successful students trained to lead Peer Assisted Study Sessions that support a range of high-fail units Successful students trained to provide online, at-elbow support for navigating the digital learning environment Embed communication, and develop and implement research-informed strategic and innovative projects that enhance student learning Referencing advice, and leadership of Digital Literacies Framework Conduct workshops, drop-ins and 1:1s on academic literacies, STEM, and study skills Successful students trained to field inquiries in Academic Skills Centres, and provide online guidance in navigating the digital environment Orange personnel groups are in CLT Develops the self-directed academic learning capabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students Oversees and facilitates investigations into allegations of Academic Breach and Academic Misconduct Advice for research students (PhD, PhD–Integrated, Master by Research and Honours Research) in workshops and individual consultations
  19. 19. Learning Support: Programs
  20. 20. SLA Project Plans that detail and map strategic embedding initiatives (example below) Project: Excel Skills Development Reason/driver: Feedback from Student Experience Survey 2018 Priority/alignment: Employability Course and Unit: Master of Project Management (L99) FBL5010 Collaborators: Kate Gree (Data analyst) Dr Manus Projector (Lecturer) Celeste Excel (Library), Carol Jobs (Careers) Output evidence: (hyperlink to relevant output) Learning Support: Practice Reason for Action Current Status Course Title (Code) Output Evidence Personal Notes (state reason for project; link to evidence/data if available) (choose from options) Other Month L&T Period Year(choose from options)(if applicable) CLT School Other (link to evidence or describe) January February March April May June July August September October November December Excel Skills Development Feedback from Student Experience Survey 2018 Employability August Semester 2 2019 Planning phase Master of Project Management FBL5010 Elizabeth Cook Dr Manus Projector (Lecturer) Miss Celeste Excel (Library), Ms Carol here you would limk First stakeholder meeting. Tasks due. Second Test Delivery Celeste will provide resources to assist with delivery. Collaboration with School progressing well. Major Course Review C33 Review of course and provide recommendations Other (write details in 'Other' column) Required by governance August Semester 2 2019 Complete d Bachelor of Science (Nursing) C33 SLA Maureen Buckingham and SLD Rebecca Scriven School MCR Consultative Committee members - Course Directors, ADTL, ADS, U/Cs SNMLibrarian Governance rep Shelly Criddle Finance reps Gerard and Ina Teams Folder SNMMCR - Provide information/data for relevant sections on learning support and embedding of communication skills. Goes to Education Committee on 5 Nov 2019 First meeting of all team and follow up meetings re learning support/l earning design and library Need data on student numbers, retention, progress, student satifaction, QILT etc Major Course Review Y76 Review of course and provide recommendations Other (write details in 'Other' column) Required by governance August Semester 2 2019 Complete d Bachor of Science (Nursing) and Bachelor of Science (Midwifery) Y76 SLA Maureen Buckingham and SLD Rebecca Scriven School MCR Consultative Committee members - Course Directors, ADTL, ADS, U/Cs SNMLibrarian Governance rep Shelly Criddle Finance reps Gerard and Ina Teams Folder SNMMCR - Provide information/data for relevant sections on learning support and embedding of communication skills First meeting of all team and follow up meetings re learning support/l earning design and library Need data on student numbers, retention, progress, student satifaction, QILT etc Personal Planning/Tasks/Actions (optional)Project Title Project Deadline Names of CollaboratorsUnit Code (if applicable) Priority
  21. 21. Learning Support: Practice Quantity Indicators Focus on areas likely to have the most impact for the student: Quality Indicators Guidelines for first 5 minutes, 20 minutes, closing 5 minutes
  22. 22. Learning Support: Partners
  23. 23. Learning Support: Impact ECU Retention and Success Report 2019 Support is just one of the many variables impacting on retention and success Cannot attribute retention or success to Learning Support alone
  24. 24. Learning Support: Impact Suite of dashboards available in Tableau Reports on all programs tabled annually at Education Committee Question Data Who engaged and who is absent? Engagement rates by Campus, School, Delivery mode, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, School Leaver (≤19), Youth Age (20–24), Mature Age (25+), Disability, First in Family, International Onshore (FPON), Non- English-Speaking Language Background, English-Speaking Language Background, Low socio-economic status, Commencing, Continuing Who benefited? Impact on student success measured by comparing % students who passed and Weighted Average Marks (WAM) of students who engage with support services versus those who do not. What difference did the program make? Qualitative data describes what each program offers individual students beyond success, e.g. confidence, reassurance, sense of belonging. Impact on staff is also important (e.g. fewer queries about assessment). Was it the difference intended? Success and retention are important measures, but there are many others. Standard method, but partially measures student self- efficacy and not impact Qualitative analysis is planned for 20/21 to better understand the range of impacts each program makes
  25. 25. Learning Support: Impact (generic sessions)
  26. 26. Learning Support: Impact (generic sessions)
  27. 27. Studiosity: Impact During COVID-19, Studiosity is available to all 35,000 students. So uptake is currently 3.2% of eligible students
  28. 28. Studiosity: Impact Success (pass) rates Cohort Accessed Studiosity Did not access Studiosity Impact (% difference) Mature age 90.5% 84.0% 6.5% Youth age 89.0% 82.7% 6.3% School leaver 92.5% 79.8% 12.7% Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 91.7% 74.4% 17.3% International Onshore (FPON) 89.9% 83.6% 6.3% Disability 80.4% 77.7% 2.7% First in Family 90.4% 82.4% 8.0% Non-English-Speaking Language Background 90.6% 81.2% 9.4% Low socioeconomic status 85.0% 78.7% 6.3% Table 3: Average success rates by level of use and cohort, 2019
  29. 29. PASS: Impact Semester 1 2019 Semester 2 2019 Distinct count of eligible students Distinct count of PASS students % eligible students attending PASS Distinct count of eligible students Distinct count of PASS students % eligible students attending PASS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 77 6 7.8% 88 7 8.0% School Leaver (≤19) 1,266 136 10.7% 1,209 144 11.9% Youth Age (20–24) 1,604 172 10.7% 1,711 216 12.6% Mature Age (25+) 1,490 256 17.2% 1,645 355 21.6% Disability 314 56 17.8% 311 56 18.0% First in Family 2,261 289 12.8% 2,281 340 14.9% International Onshore (FPON) 328 54 16.5% 480 96 20.0% Non-English-Speaking Language Background 584 91 15.6% 688 126 18.3% English-Speaking Language Background 3,778 473 12.5% 3,877 589 15.2% Commencing 2,768 377 13.6% 2,059 359 17.4% Continuing 1,606 188 11.7% 2,516 358 14.2% Table 4: Uptake of PASS by Cohort, Semesters 1 and 2 2019
  30. 30. PASS: Impact Success (pass) rate Impact of PASS (% difference)Attended PASS Did not attend Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander* 55.6% 38.9% 16.7% School Leaver (≤19) 82.9% 66.6% 16.3% Youth Age (20–24) 81.0% 61.1% 19.9% Mature Age (25+) 86.5% 64.3% 22.2% Disability 75.2% 56.1% 19.1% First in Family 83.7% 63.2% 20.5% International Onshore (FPON) 84.3% 62.5% 21.8% Non-English-Speaking Language Background 78.0% 62.8% 15.2% English-Speaking Language Background 85.3% 63.9% 21.4% Commencing 81.9% 61.7% 20.2% Table 6: Impact of PASS on success rates by Cohort, 2019
  31. 31. The ecosystem enabled agility during COVID-19 Strong alignment across layers allowed for: • quick implementation of new strategic approaches • strategic responses to issues identified on the ground Future of higher education: increasing diversity of students, offerings, delivery modes, locations Eco-system must extend in response – increasing sophistication required Personalisation at scale: • ‘journeys’ using Salesforce • readiness assessments • unbundling curriculum for micro-credential pathways Reflections and next steps
  32. 32. To what extent do the ‘layers’ of a university ecosystem speak to each other at your institutions? For discussion
  33. 33. Oliva, M., & Nora, A. (2004). College Access and the K-16 Pipeline: Connecting Policy and Practice for Latino Student Success. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, 3, 2, April 2004, 117-124 DOI: 10.1177/1538192704263707 Price RM, Alkema GE, Frank JC (2009) California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An evaluation and communication tool. Gerontology & Geriatrics Education 30. 317–331 Roxå, T., Mårtensson, K., & Alveteg, M. (2011). Understanding and influencing teaching and learning cultures at university: A network approach. Higher Education, 62, 99-111. doi:10.1007/s10734-010-9368-9 References

×