Your Social Media Wakeup Call

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Your Social Media Wakeup Call - Why you can't wait any longer to engage Hispanics

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  • Your Social Media Wakeup Call

    1. 1. YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA WAKE UP CALL : A “How To” Guide to Real-Time Online Engagement for Multicultural Marketers
    2. 2. <ul><li>TODAY’S PLAYLIST </li></ul><ul><li>Our Story </li></ul><ul><li>Why it’s time to engage with Hispanics </li></ul><ul><li>The Basics of Social Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Real-Time Publishing & How to Direct Conversations Online </li></ul><ul><li>Q&A </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>KEITH BLANCHARD , Executive Creative Director </li></ul><ul><li>CHIQUI CARTAGENA , SVP, Multicultural Marketing </li></ul><ul><li>RYAN SAGHIR , Director, Audiences Group </li></ul><ul><li>INTRODUCTIONS </li></ul>STORY IS THE ONLY MARKETING AGENCY IN THE WORLD WITH AN EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT
    4. 4. STORYTELLING Every brand has a story to tell ... those who tell them best win
    5. 5. Broadcast power is shrinking. Audiences control brand conversations. And consumers are calling the shots.
    6. 6. is NOT a risk-free strategy. DOING NOTHING UP UNTIL A YEAR AGO, saying “no” to social media was a safe course of action for anyone who wanted to stay employed in marketing. But the deep recession, combined with the rapid upswing in online social interactions, has made social messaging a necessary choice.
    7. 7. AND YET…
    8. 8. Hispanics are active social networkers
    9. 9. “ Hispanics are the most willing to engage with brands they like on Facebook and other social networks” − emarketer.com May 25, 2010
    10. 10. MEET THE HISPANIC INTERNET USER: IAB x 50% MALE/50% FEMALE HOUSEHOLD INCOME OF $77K HOUSEHOLD SIZE OF 4 (36% 5+ PERSONS) 36 YEARS OLD 64% HAVE CHILDREN AND 20% HAVE 3 OR MORE 58% OWN A HOME 69% ARE EMPLOYED (23% LIVE IN HOUSEHOLDS WITH 3+ EMPLOYED ADULTS) 80% SPEAK SPANISH AT HOME Source: Simmons NCS/NHCS Fall 2009 Full Year, Population A18+ (Nov08‐Dec09); “Online” defined as websites/search engines visited in past 30 days. 41% HAVE AT LEAST 1 YEAR OF COLLEGE (19% GRADUATED COLLEGE+) 33% U.S. RESIDENTS FOR 10+ YEARS 48% WERE BORN OUTSIDE THE U.S. 59% MEXICAN 51% MARRIED
    11. 11. CASE STUDY – KRAFT
    12. 12. CASE STUDY – FIRST CHOICE POWER
    13. 13. CASE STUDY – YO SUMO
    14. 14. THE BASICS OF SOCIAL LISTENING… How do I get started? • What does a social media strategy look like? • What do I say? • How do I staff it? • What’s the range of skills I need? • Do I want a blog or a forum? Or neither? Or both? • What software works best? • How do I set KPIs? • What listening tool is best? • What will it cost? • How do I decide what to respond to? • How can I be sure what to ignore? • How do I keep up with the FTC’s ever-changing regulations? • How do I respond in real time when it takes me 12 days to get stuff through legal? • Do I need an agency? • What does my lead social media agency do? • What do my other agencies do? • What do I handle internally? • Can I measure the ROI? • What if there’s a backlash? • What if I create more problems than I cure? • Do I allow public comments on my sites? • How do I do that? • What if someone posts something completely outrageous? • Do I need to use video? • Do I have to write everything myself, because I do NOT have time and I can’t write. • How do I handle blogger outreach? • How do I budget for social media? • Can I outsource social media or do I have to do it all myself? • How can I schedule social media programs? • How do I get started? • What does a social media strategy look like? • What do I say? • How do I staff it? • What’s the range of skills I need? • Do I want a blog or a forum? Or neither? Or both? • What software works best? • How do I set KPIs? • What listening tool is best? • What will it cost? • How do I decide what to respond to? • How can I be sure what to ignore? • How do I keep up with the FTC’s ever-changing regulations? • How do I respond in real time when it takes me 12 days to get stuff through legal? • Do I need an agency? • What does my lead … AND REAL-TIME PUBLISHING
    15. 15. <ul><li>here’s a conversation going on about your brand, whether you like it or not. Time to engage. But how? </li></ul>T
    16. 16. IT’S A JUNGLE OUT THERE ... ...AND EACH PLATFORM HAS A SOUL
    17. 17. <ul><li>DISTILL YOUR OWN SPECIFIC , ONGOING , MULTICHANNEL , DISTRIBUTED CONVERSATION FROM THE SEA OF IRRELEVANT CHATTER . </li></ul><ul><li>Find the signal in the noise... </li></ul>STEP 1 : LISTEN . CAREFULLY .
    18. 18. HERE’S HOW TO DISTILL YOUR CONVERSATION from all the relevant thought streams . <ul><li>Listen in all the right places. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social media platforms can be segregated by topic type, media delivery, demo served, and other factors. Choose a set relevant to your needs and budget. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Choose your words carefully. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose search terms for your brand, your company, your product type, and whatever else is appropriate—your competitors’ names? Your critics? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gather a statistically significant sample. Then stop. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To normalize your results, sample at different times of day, week, season. People are generally more positive about tequila at midnight on Saturday than at 9 AM on Monday. </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>STEP 2 : ANALYZE WHAT YOU HEARD . </li></ul>INFER OPINIONS FROM COMMENTS YOU’VE GATHERED , AND CORRAL OFF DEFINED GROUPS YOU CAN ADDRESS WITH SPECIFIC STRATEGIES . And figure out who’s doing the talking.
    20. 20. COMMENTS AREN’T IMPORTANT— the people behind them are important . <ul><li>To divide your audience into addressable segments, start by focusing on one metric, like favorability or awareness. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, to measure how favorable people are generally about your brand, you might first divide the voices into: </li></ul>YOUR FANATICS YOUR FRIENDS YOUR ACQUAINTANCES YOUR FOES YOUR FIENDS
    21. 21. EMPOWER YOUR FANATICS <ul><li>Reach out individually, validate their interest, and arm them to help you. Can you give an early look at a new product? An interview with the CEO? </li></ul>: ) : / >:( : * : D REWARD YOUR FRIENDS : ) : / >:( : * : D Acknowledge and thank those who are speaking well of you. Help friends gain recognition and traffic, and you’ll start to shed that unattractive corporate skin. BEFRIEND ACQUAINTANCES : ) : / >:( : * : D DEBATE YOUR FOES : ) : / >:( : * : D DISARM YOUR FIENDS : ) : / >:( : * : D This is the mass play, where your broadcast messaging lives. Nudge them to the positive, try to forge emotional connections, be a good communicative citizen. Neutralize negativity by sharing positive “counter-experiences.” Helpfully dispel misconceptions; repair and repost. Make negativity feel like the exception. Reach out individually and address concerns, fearlessly and publicly. Brighten their sentiment or lower their influence before the flames spread. Apologize!
    22. 22. <ul><li>USE WHAT YOU’VE LEARNED ABOUT YOUR AUDIENCE TO CAUTIOUSLY , DIRECTEDLY , EFFICIENTLY AFFECT THE CONVERSATION . </li></ul><ul><li>Time to engage…wisely. </li></ul><ul><li>STEP 3 : JOIN IN AND SPEAK UP . </li></ul>
    23. 23. IMPORTANT! Before everyone starts rowing , choose a direction . <ul><li>Know your brand story inside and out. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do your customers, employees, and competitors think you’re all about? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Express your brand in a simple encapsulating phrase. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This will be a “perception goal” your efforts should aim toward. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For our clients, we call this the Story Platform. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It’s complicated to get this right. But if it’s authentic, the payoff is tremendous. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Real-Time PUBLISHING
    25. 25. ENGAGEMENT IS NOT ABOUT DUELING WITH CRITICS. IT’S ACTUALLY ABOUT: <ul><li>Diving into your brand’s conversation. </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastically. There is the potential to do great good and to avert great evil. </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing in real time. </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing content people will welcome and comments they’ll respect. And doing it NOW. </li></ul><ul><li>Revealing that there are humans in your organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Corporations are easy to hate, particularly online. People are easier to like (and to forgive). </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting with the people telling your story. </li></ul><ul><li>So that you can start telling your story, too. </li></ul>
    26. 26. 1 ST THING TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR AUDIENCES IS how and how much THEY ENGAGE IN SOCIAL MEDIA. are the few and powerful who actually create content and publish it in social media. CREATORS CRITICS COLLECTORS JOINERS SPECTATORS Forrester Research in 2006 invented “social technographics,” which splits all humanity into six groups according to the activities they participate in at least monthly on social media. rate and review products/services, comment on blogs, participate in forums, edit wikis. use RSS to “collect” content, vote up content on sites like Digg, tag photos and web pages. maintain profiles on and visit social sites. just watch—reading blogs, looking at videos, paying attention to social sites.
    27. 27. 2 ND STEP WITH AUDIENCES: SEGMENT MESSAGING BY EACH PERSON’S PLACE IN THE TRADITIONAL PURCHASE FUNNEL AWARENESS CONSIDERATION PURCHASE RE-PURCHASE LOYALTY Build anticipation to increase velocity to market; put your brand in the consideration set. Provide reasons to buy: Features, offers, lifestyle pluses, testimonials, etc. Reinforce purchase decision and welcome buyer to community. Provide responsive customer service and valuable content. Deliver news of innovations, improvements and other incentives to accelerate second purchase. Social media is particularly important in the purchase funnel because the top two purchase influencers are the opinions of friends and of strangers online, Nielsen has found.
    28. 28. 3 RD STEP: KNOW AUDIENCES’ SENTIMENTS AND INFLUENCE WITH OTHERS
    29. 29. HOW TO SHIFT A CONVERSATION <ul><li>This is where you converse one to one while you measure, adjust and maintain your brand’s conversation. Broadly speaking, there are three strategic objectives to active response. Ideally, you want to: </li></ul><ul><li>Make the NEGATIVE more POSITIVE . </li></ul><ul><li>Make the POSITIVE more INFLUENTIAL . </li></ul><ul><li>Give the NEUTRAL something to believe. </li></ul>
    30. 30. MOVE SENTIMENT AND INFLUENCE ACQUAINTANCES FOES FIENDS FRIENDS FANATICS You move sentiment through conversation management . Sentiment Influence
    31. 31. MOVE SENTIMENT AND INFLUENCE You move influence through relationship management . ACQUAINTANCES FOES FIENDS FRIENDS FANATICS Sentiment Influence
    32. 32. Active RESPONSE
    33. 33. A DEFINED agency-client RESPONSE TEAM enables REAL-TIME, ON-BRAND PUBLISHING… AGENCY TEAM CLIENT-SIDE TEAM Expertise and Approvals Managing Editor Active Responders managing the conversation Writers and Editors publishing and linking Tech and Production Social Media Lead PR Team Leader Brand Manager Corporate Lawyer Other individual client-side experts Listening and Publishing
    34. 35. ADHERING TO PROTOCOLS ENABLES TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION BETWEEN BRAND AND CONSUMER in something like real time. “ My widget is broken and nobody at Widgetz will help!” Comment captured and classified by response team. Reply suggested to appropriate client-side approver(s). Approved client reply returned to response team. Response posted. 1 2 3 4 5 “ My widget is broken and nobody at Widgetz will help!” Hey, it’s Bob from Widgetz. We’re sorry you’re having trouble. Click here for the manual…you want page 61. Comment posted online.
    35. 36. RISK and REWARD
    36. 37. RISK #1: THE SNOWBALL EFFECT Angry customer tweets a false rumor. Influential blogger gets “tipped” on the false info. Gleeful readers spread the rumor on social networks, citing the blogger. Lazy analysts and major media reporters write articles citing these “multiple online sources.” A negative thread, if unchecked, can quickly spell social media disaster. Especially if it’s entertaining, negative and anti-corporate. Everyone loves to hate on big business!
    37. 38. RISK #1: THE SNOWBALL EFFECT We respond on Twitter, using the same #hashtag so searches find our correction whenever they find the false info. We reach out to the blogger to alert him to the error. If the blogger doesn’t retract quickly enough, we tell his or her competition. We post the truth, then go into every comment stream and link readers back to it. THIS COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED or MITIGATED Angry customer tweets a false rumor. Influential blogger gets “tipped” on the false info. Gleeful readers spread the rumor on social networks, citing the blogger. Lazy analysts and major media reporters write articles citing these “multiple online sources.”
    38. 39. RISK #2: THE BACKLASH A misguided effort is loosed in the blogosphere. Aggrieved/amused blogosphere retorts entertainingly. If a corporate effort in social media, no matter how pure in motivation or clever in execution, comes across as insincere, self-serving or insufficiently humble, it can be exposed by the online arbiters of justice, and used to demonstrate your venality or idiocy. You now have a bigger problem than the one you started with.
    39. 40. RISK #2: THE BACKLASH A misguided effort is loosed in the blogosphere. Aggrieved/amused blogosphere retorts entertainingly. You now have a bigger problem than the one you started with. THIS COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED or REPURPOSED Too late? Decide if you want to play (respond more interestingly/amusingly than the backlash) or throw in the towel (apologize). Avoid releasing the kinds of content that incite backlash. Be honest, transparent, do good. No puffery, no fakery.
    40. 41. RISK #3: CREATING A MONSTER Anonymous complainer is ignored. He arranges an entertaining protest vehicle. The web takes notice and makes him famous. Now he makes a living hating you professionally.
    41. 42. RISK #3: CREATING A MONSTER Anonymous complainer is ignored. He arranges an entertaining protest vehicle. The web takes notice and makes him famous. Now he makes a living hating you professionally. THIS COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED or MINIMIZED Perfect juncture to post a mea culpa and offer to make it better…publicly, so everyone can see you. Active Response Team in place would have caught the initial complaint. The anonymous complainer is king! You have one last chance to bring him into the fold. Can you make him a consultant?
    42. 43. In CONCLUSION…
    43. 44. WHAT ENGAGEMENT CAN’T DO <ul><li>It can’t make a bad product good. E ngagement is no substitute for providing the quality goods and services that people want. </li></ul><ul><li>It can’t stop an entertainingly bad story. If one of your detractors hits your CEO with a pie and gets the video to YouTube, best to let it run its course. </li></ul><ul><li>It can’t gloss over corporate goofballery. The web wants honesty and transparency, and loves to hate on the misbehaving and misguided. </li></ul><ul><li>It can’t squelch dissent or accomplish any other heavy-handed goals. You will inspire backlash, create monsters and initiate terrible snowball effects. </li></ul>
    44. 45. WHAT ENGAGEMENT CAN DO <ul><li>Show the online world you hear them and care about their opinions. </li></ul><ul><li>Build trust by showing you are wired . If a company can’t put a Facebook page together, what quality can I expect from their car/bank? </li></ul><ul><li>Correct misperceptions and address grievances publicly. And prevent unwarranted bad rumors from spreading too quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>Reward and empower brand advocates. A powerful, credible online team who can tell YOUR story the way it was always meant to be told! </li></ul><ul><li>Provide information and reassurance needed for purchase decisions. In the end, this is about creating customers, loyalists, advocates. </li></ul>
    45. 46. <ul><li>ngagement through social media is fundamentally changing the way business is done. Interacting with consumers is quickly replacing broadcasting at them as the most effective means of brand communication. </li></ul><ul><li>Are you ready? </li></ul><ul><li>E </li></ul>
    46. 47. Chiqui Cartagena SVP, Multicultural Marketing Ph: 646-437-0646 [email_address] www.storyworldwide.com

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