Operationalizing Dialogue games for
Collaborative Modelling
stijn.hoppenbrouwers@han.nl
* Thank you:
Jan Pieter Zwart, HAN UAS
Jan Vogels, Radboud University Nijmegen
Rob Thijssen, Radboud University Nijmegen /...
* Outline
 The challenge of model elicitation
 Modelling as a dialogue
 Gamification and Dialogue games
 A prototype D...
* The challenge of model elicitation
* Immediate research goal
 How can we make elicitation/modeling
procedures easier and more accessible while
maintaining a...
Modelling as a Dialogue
The Basic Idea
 Every collaboratively created model is the
result of a dialogue, that could be logged; the
model reflects...
Example Video
CLICK HERE
* RIM model: Rules, Interactions, Models
Rules Interactions
Models
(propositions)
Log
But what are the rules of such
„game...
Dialogue Games
 Theoretical roots in Wittgenstein‟s „language
games‟ and in Argumentation Theory
 InterLocoperationaliza...
Further issues, however:
 How to break this down into
manageable, playable, focused sub-parts?
 How to keep an overview?...
A Dialogue Game for FCO-IM conceptualization
(Mickey Mouse example; sorry)
* FCO-IM example (without constraints)
Dialogue Game Setup
 Word processor, editor/verbalizer
 Could also be paper, whiteboard
 Structured chat device
 But n...
Mission List
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Concept “Student” [+]
– Concept “...
Opener fragments
 Could you give a meaningful name for this <type concept>?
For instance, Fido is a Dog; Mercedes Benz is...
Example (1/9): mission list
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Concept “Student” ...
Example (2/9): adding the template steps
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Conce...
Example (3/9): selecting a question
Options:
 Could you give four examples of mentorships?
 How do you distinguish one m...
Example (4/9): the answer
Could you give four examples of mentorships?
 The mentor of John Doe is JPZ
 The mentor of Jan...
Example (5/9): mission list
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Concept “Student” ...
Example (6/9): get elementary fact
and label types
So this is what we get for “mentorship” :
 The mentor of John Doe is J...
Example (7/9): mission list
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Concept “Student” ...
Example (8/9): get the identifier for Mentor
How do you distinguish one mentor from another in the
administration?
By a th...
Example (9/9): mission list
 Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain
– Concept “Project” [+]
– Concept “Student” ...
Diagram/verbalization example
* Some more questions and answers
 How is your work different from other
work in the field? Connection to others
in works...
Operationalizing Dialogue Games for Collaborative Modelling - Hoppenbrouwers
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Operationalizing Dialogue Games for Collaborative Modelling - Hoppenbrouwers

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Presentation for the MoRoCo '13 workshop at ECSCW 2013;
"Models and their Role in Collaboration".

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Operationalizing Dialogue Games for Collaborative Modelling - Hoppenbrouwers

  1. 1. Operationalizing Dialogue games for Collaborative Modelling stijn.hoppenbrouwers@han.nl
  2. 2. * Thank you: Jan Pieter Zwart, HAN UAS Jan Vogels, Radboud University Nijmegen Rob Thijssen, Radboud University Nijmegen / Moxx
  3. 3. * Outline  The challenge of model elicitation  Modelling as a dialogue  Gamification and Dialogue games  A prototype DG for FCO-IM conceptualisation
  4. 4. * The challenge of model elicitation
  5. 5. * Immediate research goal  How can we make elicitation/modeling procedures easier and more accessible while maintaining a systematic and efficient approach?  How to operationally capture and shape expert knowledge on model elicitation? I‟m not claiming I have the answer, but here‟s my 5 ct •Most experts have gotten the hang of elicitation and most of them successfully wing it –which is great • Yet most novice modelers have substantial trouble in effectively handling a systematic, goal-driven elicitation/modelling process • Is “throwing them in at the deep end” a satisfactory approach to instructing/ supporting elicitors?
  6. 6. Modelling as a Dialogue
  7. 7. The Basic Idea  Every collaboratively created model is the result of a dialogue, that could be logged; the model reflects the dialogue  Every change in the model implies a proposition, for example “I propose to add the concept/object student”.  Every proposition can then be discussed: argued for/against, accepted/rejected, asked about, … Theory: conversation view on Collaborative Modelling sessions
  8. 8. Example Video CLICK HERE
  9. 9. * RIM model: Rules, Interactions, Models Rules Interactions Models (propositions) Log But what are the rules of such „games‟, and what are successful tactics/strategies?
  10. 10. Dialogue Games  Theoretical roots in Wittgenstein‟s „language games‟ and in Argumentation Theory  InterLocoperationalization: “Structured Chats”  Opener mechanism: e.g. “I disagree with this because …”  Example in System Dynamics modelling context
  11. 11. Further issues, however:  How to break this down into manageable, playable, focused sub-parts?  How to keep an overview?  How to actively support contextualized questioning and answering (Prompting!)?  This has led to the current “Dialogue game Setup” (admittedly, still experimental…)  Generic in nature, details aimed at FCO-IM conceptualisation phase
  12. 12. A Dialogue Game for FCO-IM conceptualization (Mickey Mouse example; sorry)
  13. 13. * FCO-IM example (without constraints)
  14. 14. Dialogue Game Setup  Word processor, editor/verbalizer  Could also be paper, whiteboard  Structured chat device  But normal, f2f conversation also possible  Roles: facilitator, participant(s)  Game structure (sub-activities; flow)  Evolving „Mission List‟  Structured openers (context sensitive)
  15. 15. Mission List  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] • Get 4 examples of “Mentorship” • Get elementary fact • Get identifier • Get LTL-FTE (label expression) • Get OTL-FTE (object expression) • OPTIONAL: identify uniqueness constraint (UC) • OPTIONAL: identify totality constraint (TC) • Draw part of the Information Grammar Diagram • Validate drawn Information Grammar Diagram and repository information – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  16. 16. Opener fragments  Could you give a meaningful name for this <type concept>? For instance, Fido is a Dog; Mercedes Benz is a Car Brand. (Elicits a meaningful type name for an object, label or fact type)  How are <object>s identified? For example, a ‘Dutch Citizen’ has a name but also a unique Citizen Service Number (Elicits an identifier for a concept)  How do you distinguish between <object>s in your communication? (Auxiliary question for eliciting an identifier for a concept)  Can there be two <object>s with the same <identifier>? (Validates the uniqueness of an identifier)
  17. 17. Example (1/9): mission list  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  18. 18. Example (2/9): adding the template steps  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] • Get 4 examples of “Mentorship” • Get elementary fact • Get identifier • Get LTL-FTE (label expression) • Get OTL-FTE (object expression) • OPTIONAL: identify uniqueness constraint (UC) • OPTIONAL: identify totality constraint (TC) • Draw part of the Information Grammar Diagram • Validate drawn Information Grammar Diagram and repository information – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  19. 19. Example (3/9): selecting a question Options:  Could you give four examples of mentorships?  How do you distinguish one mentor from another in the administration?  …
  20. 20. Example (4/9): the answer Could you give four examples of mentorships?  The mentor of John Doe is JPZ  The mentor of Jane Doe is HOP  The mentor of Jack Frost is HOP  The mentor of Britney Spears is BAK
  21. 21. Example (5/9): mission list  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] • Get 4 examples of “Mentorship” • Get elementary fact • Get identifier • Get LTL-FTE (label expression) • Get OTL-FTE (object expression) • OPTIONAL: identify uniqueness constraint (UC) • OPTIONAL: identify totality constraint (TC) • Draw part of the Information Grammar Diagram • Validate drawn Information Grammar Diagram and repository information – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  22. 22. Example (6/9): get elementary fact and label types So this is what we get for “mentorship” :  The mentor of John Doe is JPZ  “ Jane Doe “ HOP  “ Jack Frost “ HOP  “ Britney Spears “ BAK What do you call the John/Jane/Jack/Britney thing? It‟s the student And the JPZ/HOP/HOP/BAK thing? It‟s the student‟s mentor
  23. 23. Example (7/9): mission list  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] • Get 4 examples of “Mentorship” • Get elementary fact • Get identifier • Get LTL-FTE (label expression) • Get OTL-FTE (object expression) • OPTIONAL: identify uniqueness constraint (UC) • OPTIONAL: identify totality constraint (TC) • Draw part of the Information Grammar Diagram • Validate drawn Information Grammar Diagram and repository information – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  24. 24. Example (8/9): get the identifier for Mentor How do you distinguish one mentor from another in the administration? By a three letter teacher code (like BAK)
  25. 25. Example (9/9): mission list  Create FCO-IM model of “student project” domain – Concept “Project” [+] – Concept “Student” [+] – Concept “Mentorship” [+] • Get 4 examples of “Mentorship” • Get elementary fact • Get identifier • Get LTL-FTE (label expression) • Get OTL-FTE (object expression) • OPTIONAL: identify uniqueness constraint (UC) • OPTIONAL: identify totality constraint (TC) • Draw part of the Information Grammar Diagram • Validate drawn Information Grammar Diagram and repository information – Concept “Mentor” [+]
  26. 26. Diagram/verbalization example
  27. 27. * Some more questions and answers  How is your work different from other work in the field? Connection to others in workshop?  What does it add to the area of collaborative usage and development of models?  What is controversial about your work? What should we discuss about it?

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