Chapter 6 Landforms
Plains Sec 6-1 H.W. pg 159 ques. 1-3 <ul><li>Plains are large, flat, often found in the interior regions of continents.  <...
Interior Plains
Plains <ul><li>A coastal plain is also known as a lowland, because it is lower in elevation, than the land around it. </li...
Coastal Plain
Plateaus <ul><li>Plateaus are flat, raised areas of land made up of nearly horizontal rocks that have been uplifted by for...
 
Mountains <ul><li>Mt. Everest is the tallest mountain at 8,800 meters above sea level. </li></ul><ul><li>There are 4 types...
Folded mountains <ul><li>Folded mountains have layers of rock that appear to be folded like a rug. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: A...
Upwarped Mountains <ul><li>Upwarped mountains form when blocks of Earths crust are pushed up by forces inside of the Earth...
Fault-block Mountains <ul><li>Fault-block mountains are made of huge, tilted blocks of rock that are separated from surrou...
Volcanic Mountains <ul><li>Volcanic mountains form when molten material reaches the surface through a weak area of the cru...
Latitude & Longitude Sec 6-2 H.W. pg 163 ques. 1-4 <ul><li>Latitude and longitude lines on the globe form an imaginary gri...
Latitude
Latitude & Longitude <ul><li>Longitude lines or meridians, are vertical lines on either side of the prime meridian.  </li>...
Longitude
Prime Meridian <ul><li>The meridian does not circle the globe like the equator. It runs from the North pole, through Green...
Time Zones <ul><li>Time is measured by tracking Earth’s movement in relation to the Sun. </li></ul><ul><li>Each day is 24 ...
Time Zones
International Date line <ul><li>You lose and gain time as you enter different time zones. If you travel far enough you wil...
Maps Section 6-3 pg 178 ques. 1-20 <ul><li>Maps are made as projections. A projection is made when points and lines on a g...
Mercator Projection <ul><li>Used a lot on ships, but distorts the land masses a lot.  </li></ul>
Robinson projection <ul><li>Here the continent shapes are more accurately depicted. And the longitude lines are curved lik...
Conic Projection <ul><li>These are used to to produce maps of small areas, and are not good for mapping the poles.  They a...
Topographic Maps <ul><li>These maps model the changes in elevation on Earth’s surface.  They help to identify hills, mount...
Topographic Map
Map scales and Legends  H.W. pg 176-176 ques. 1-10  <ul><li>A map scale shows you how to calculate a distance on a map in ...
Scale and  Legend
Geologic Maps <ul><li>These maps are used to show the arrangements and types of rocks that are at the Earth’s surface. </l...
 
3-dimentional maps <ul><li>Sometimes 2-D maps like topographic and geological maps are not the best ways to depict an area...
3-D Map
<ul><li>Test on chapter 6 in one  week!!!!!!!!!!! </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter 6- landforms

4,803 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,803
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
35
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
161
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 6- landforms

  1. 1. Chapter 6 Landforms
  2. 2. Plains Sec 6-1 H.W. pg 159 ques. 1-3 <ul><li>Plains are large, flat, often found in the interior regions of continents. </li></ul><ul><li>They are ideal for agriculture, and usually have thick, fertile soil, and large grassy meadows, that are ideal for grazing animals, like cows. </li></ul><ul><li>When a plain is close to the ocean, it is called a coastal plain. </li></ul><ul><li>Interior plains and coastal plains make up half of all the land in the U.S. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Interior Plains
  4. 4. Plains <ul><li>A coastal plain is also known as a lowland, because it is lower in elevation, than the land around it. </li></ul><ul><li>We find interior plains between the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains. </li></ul><ul><li>The largest of all the plains, the Great Plains, lies between the Rockies and the Mississippi River. </li></ul><ul><li>The Great Plains are also called the highlands because of their high elevation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Coastal Plain
  6. 6. Plateaus <ul><li>Plateaus are flat, raised areas of land made up of nearly horizontal rocks that have been uplifted by forces within the Earth. </li></ul><ul><li>They differ from plains because their edges rise steeply from the land around them. </li></ul><ul><li>Because of their hight due to the uplifting, it is common for plateaus to be cut through by deep river valleys and canyons. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: The Colorado River cut deep into the rock layers of a plateau to form the Grand Canyon. </li></ul>
  7. 8. Mountains <ul><li>Mt. Everest is the tallest mountain at 8,800 meters above sea level. </li></ul><ul><li>There are 4 types of mountains: </li></ul><ul><li>Folded mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Fault-block mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Upwarped mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Volcanic mountains </li></ul>
  8. 9. Folded mountains <ul><li>Folded mountains have layers of rock that appear to be folded like a rug. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Appalachian and Rocky mountains of Canada. </li></ul><ul><li>Forces within the Earth squeeze horizontal rock layers together, causing them to fold. </li></ul>
  9. 10. Upwarped Mountains <ul><li>Upwarped mountains form when blocks of Earths crust are pushed up by forces inside of the Earth. </li></ul><ul><li>They have high peaks and sharp ridges. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Adirondack and Black Hills mountains </li></ul>
  10. 11. Fault-block Mountains <ul><li>Fault-block mountains are made of huge, tilted blocks of rock that are separated from surrounding rocks by faults, or large fractures in rock. </li></ul><ul><li>These mountains have majestic peaks and steep slopes. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: The Grand Teton and Sierra Nevada mountains of Wyoming and California. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Volcanic Mountains <ul><li>Volcanic mountains form when molten material reaches the surface through a weak area of the crust. The deposited materials pile up, one on top of another until a cone-shaped structure forms. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Mt. St. Helens in Washington </li></ul>
  12. 13. Latitude & Longitude Sec 6-2 H.W. pg 163 ques. 1-4 <ul><li>Latitude and longitude lines on the globe form an imaginary grid system that allows people to locate any place on Earth. </li></ul><ul><li>Latitude lines, or parallels, are lines that run parallel to the Earth’s equator, which is a line that circles the Earth, half way between the North and South poles. </li></ul><ul><li>The Equator separates the Earth into Northern and Southern Hemispheres. </li></ul><ul><li>Latitude lines never cross and are measured in degrees. O o is the equator and each pole North and South is 90 0 . Go in 15 degree intervals. </li></ul><ul><li>Below the equator is called South latitude and above the equator is North latitude. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Latitude
  14. 15. Latitude & Longitude <ul><li>Longitude lines or meridians, are vertical lines on either side of the prime meridian. </li></ul><ul><li>The prime meridian acts as a reference point for longitude lines, just like the equator was a reference line for latitude. </li></ul><ul><li>The prime meridian is O 0 the longitude lines go up in intervals of 15 0 around the globe to 180 o . </li></ul><ul><li>Areas east of the prime meridian are east longitudes and west of the meridian they are west longitudes. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Longitude
  16. 17. Prime Meridian <ul><li>The meridian does not circle the globe like the equator. It runs from the North pole, through Greenwich, England to the South pole. </li></ul><ul><li>The meridian opposite the prime meridian is the 180 meridian. </li></ul><ul><li>When giving latitude and longitude coordinates we always give the latitude position first. </li></ul>
  17. 18. Time Zones <ul><li>Time is measured by tracking Earth’s movement in relation to the Sun. </li></ul><ul><li>Each day is 24 hrs long, so we divide the Earth into 24 different time zones. </li></ul><ul><li>Each time zone is 15 o of longitude wide and is 1 hr different than the zones on either side of it. </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. has 6 time zones. </li></ul>
  18. 19. Time Zones
  19. 20. International Date line <ul><li>You lose and gain time as you enter different time zones. If you travel far enough you will lose or gain a whole day. </li></ul><ul><li>The international date line is a transition line for calendar days and is near longitude line 180. </li></ul><ul><li>If you travel West across the date line you move your calendar forward a day. </li></ul><ul><li>If you travel east and cross the date line you move your calendar back a day. </li></ul>
  20. 21. Maps Section 6-3 pg 178 ques. 1-20 <ul><li>Maps are made as projections. A projection is made when points and lines on a globe are transferred to paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Projections are made different ways and usually distort the shapes of the land masses on them. </li></ul>
  21. 22. Mercator Projection <ul><li>Used a lot on ships, but distorts the land masses a lot. </li></ul>
  22. 23. Robinson projection <ul><li>Here the continent shapes are more accurately depicted. And the longitude lines are curved like on a globe. </li></ul>
  23. 24. Conic Projection <ul><li>These are used to to produce maps of small areas, and are not good for mapping the poles. They are made by projecting points and lines of a globe onto a cone. </li></ul>
  24. 25. Topographic Maps <ul><li>These maps model the changes in elevation on Earth’s surface. They help to identify hills, mountains, and valleys. </li></ul><ul><li>These maps have contour lines that connect points of equal elevation. </li></ul><ul><li>If the change in elevation is steep the contour lines are close together. If it is not steep but slight then the lines are farther apart. </li></ul><ul><li>The difference in elevation b/w two contour lines is called a contour interval. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Topographic Map
  26. 27. Map scales and Legends H.W. pg 176-176 ques. 1-10 <ul><li>A map scale shows you how to calculate a distance on a map in comparison to actual distance on the Earth. Ex: 1 inch=10miles. </li></ul><ul><li>A map legend is used to explain what symbols on a map mean. </li></ul>
  27. 28. Scale and Legend
  28. 29. Geologic Maps <ul><li>These maps are used to show the arrangements and types of rocks that are at the Earth’s surface. </li></ul><ul><li>These maps are used to locate and extract natural resources. </li></ul>
  29. 31. 3-dimentional maps <ul><li>Sometimes 2-D maps like topographic and geological maps are not the best ways to depict an area. </li></ul><ul><li>So we use 3-D computerized maps to get a better idea of the surface features of land. </li></ul>
  30. 32. 3-D Map
  31. 33. <ul><li>Test on chapter 6 in one week!!!!!!!!!!! </li></ul>

×