Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ensure Sprint Success with Stories that are Ready

11 views

Published on

"Never pull anything into a sprint that is not ready, and never let anything out of a sprint that is not done.”

Creating a comprehensive "Definition of Done (DoD)" is a widely accepted Agile practice that fosters a culture of accountability, minimizes rework, and reduces team conflict. However, when a team first establishes a DoD, things often get worse before they get better. Why? Because the team no longer gets credit for incomplete work. Committed stories are started but not finished, multiple stories are carried over to the next sprint, and the team's velocity decreases. So what can be done to overcome this common problem?

An important tool to ensuring that stories are completed is an unambiguous Definition of Ready (DoR). Many Scrum-team issues are rooted in misunderstood and poorly prepared stories. In fact, I believe that stories that are NOT ready, but have been COMMITTED to a Sprint, are the root of all Scrum evil. Stories that are "ready" need to be clear, concise, and actionable.

In this hands-on presentation and workshop, I will demonstrate the methods that I have used with multiple organizations to create stories that are truly ready for a Sprint, including:

Learn my three-touch refinement technique (speed refining, sprint refining, and sprint planning) that requires teams to "touch" a story three times before the sprint
Cultivate stories slowly and methodically to build shared vision
Use Story Mapping to visualize the backlog, find missing stories, and understand customer journeys
Write test cases before the sprint as a technique to decompose stories and uncover hidden questions
Establishing a team-level "Definition of Ready (DoR)"

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Ensure Sprint Success with Stories that are Ready

  1. 1. Ensure Sprint Success with Stories that are READY Steven Granese VP, Transform Practice Tampa, FL, USA @sgranese Steven.Granese@AgileThought.com
  2. 2. Why Scrum Fails? 1. Poor Structure 2. Wrong Mindset 3. Lack of Clarity about Work
  3. 3. What is Clarity? the entire team has a full understanding of the customer’s problem that needs to be solved
  4. 4. Clarity Takes Time Individuals don’t WRITE stories. Teams CULTIVATE Stories
  5. 5. VISIONING REFINING definition of ready shared understanding THINKING effectiveness mindset Today’s Agenda STRATEGIC TACTICAL PRINCIPLE #1 PRINCIPLE #2 PRINCIPLE #3
  6. 6. THE IMPORTANCE OF DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVENESS MINDSET thinking
  7. 7. Why Blockbuster Didn’t Have to Fail Massively Efficient Operations Forbes.com “The irony is that Blockbuster failed BECAUSE its leadership had built a well-oiled operational machine.”
  8. 8. Agile in the “Real World” Adapt & Iterate “You think you have a plan, but you need to be more AGILE because things are way more complex.” EFFICIENT, wired processes don’t work; Disorienting … Frameworks… Learn everyday http://www.cc.com/video-clips/alq7q1/the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart-stanley-mcchrystal
  9. 9. Adaptability is the Goal “Adaptability, not efficiency, must become our central competency.” –Team of Teams
  10. 10. Individuals and Interactions over processes and tools Working Software over comprehensive documentation Customer Collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to Change over following a plan We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. www.agilemanifesto.org New Value for the Agile Manifesto Effectiveness over efficiency
  11. 11. Principle #1 A team first needs to focus on becoming EFFECTIVE… …then can worry about being EFFICIENT.
  12. 12. APPLYING AN EFFECTIVENESS MINDSET TO CREATE A SHARED UNDERSTANDING visioning
  13. 13. Find Flights Modify Itinerary Search for Flights Select Flight Verify Correct Flight Update Account Purchase Ticket Confirm Purchase Change Flight Time Search by Airport Search by Date & Time Search by Price Search for Non-Stop Choose One Way Opt. View Assigned Seat Change Seat View Flight Details Enter Contact Info Change Email Pay with Visa Display Confirm. Number Find Nearby Flights Select New Flight Select Multi-City Opt. Upgrade Seat Share w/ Friend Add Frequent Flier No. Email Confirm. Number Display Flight Map Change Password Print Confirm. No. Purchase Tickets Choose Round Trip Opt. Select Seat Pay with AmEx Store Credit Card Receive Alert Cancel Flight Cancel Single Flight Cancel All Flights Business Families Vacations Discount Themes/Epics FeaturesUser s Story Mapping Example User Stories
  14. 14. Find Flights Modify Itinerary Search for Flights Select Flight Verify Correct Flight Update Account Purchase Ticket Confirm Purchase Change Flight Time Search by Airport Search by Date & Time Search by Price Search for Non-Stop Choose One Way Opt. View Assigned Seat Change Seat View Flight Details Enter Contact Info Change Email Pay with Visa Display Confirm. Number Find Nearby Flights Select New Flight Select Multi-City Opt. Upgrade Seat Share w/ Friend Add Frequent Flier No. Email Confirm. Number Display Flight Map Change Password Print Confirm. No. Purchase Tickets Choose Round Trip Opt. Select Seat Pay with AmEx Store Credit Card Receive Alert Cancel Flight Cancel Single Flight Cancel All Flights Business Families Vacations Discount User s RELEASE 1 Themes/Epics Features User Stories
  15. 15. Find Flights Modify Itinerary Search for Flights Select Flight Verify Correct Flight Update Account Purchase Ticket Confirm Purchase Change Flight Time Search by Airport Search by Date & Time Search by Price Search for Non-Stop Choose One Way Opt. View Assigned Seat Change Seat View Flight Details Enter Contact Info Change Email Pay with Visa Display Confirm. Number Find Nearby Flights Select New Flight Select Multi-City Opt. Upgrade Seat Share w/ Friend Add Frequent Flier No. Email Confirm. Number Display Flight Map Change Password Print Confirm. No. Purchase Tickets Choose Round Trip Opt. Select Seat Pay with AmEx Store Credit Card Receive Alert Cancel Flight Cancel Single Flight Cancel All Flights Business Families Vacations Discount User s RELEASE 1 Themes/Epics Features User Stories As a business flier, I want to pay with my American Express credit card so that I can purchase an airline ticket.
  16. 16. Product Backlog vs Story Map 1. Promotes Shared Understanding and Context 2. Great for finding Hidden Stories 3. Effective SEARCH BY AIRPORT CHOOSE ONE WAY OPT. VIEW ASSIGNE D SEAT 1. Promotes Priority Conversations and Focus 2. Great for Estimating Timelines and Dates 3. Efficient
  17. 17. Principle #2 …TO EFFECTIVELY BUILD A SHARED UNDERSTANDING. The team discusses and cultivates user stories TOGETHER...
  18. 18. FOLLOWING A METHODICAL PROCESS TO CLARIFY PROBLEMS THAT NEED TO BE SOLVED refining
  19. 19. Three-Touch Refining Process (Overview) SPEED REFINING SPRINT REFINING SPRINT PLANNING The team “touches” each story three times! (hint – not efficient!)
  20. 20. Three-Touch Refining Process (Details) SPEED REFINING SPRINT REFINING SPRINT PLANNING WHAT? WHY? WHEN? Clarify the Problem. Don’t Solution! Team provides quick forecast after discussing for 3-5 mins. “Regular” Sprint Planning Event Daily/Weekly, based on volume Help Product Owner to prioritize on the backlog Deep discussion of stories for next sprint Deepen teams understanding of customers’ problem At least one week before sprint planning Create Sprint Goal and make realistic commitments Immediately before the Sprint
  21. 21. Foundation for the Definition of Ready SPEED REFINING SPRINT REFINING SPRINT PLANNING • Initial Story Point Estimate • At least one acceptance criteria • Prioritized on the backlog • Full user story format • Completed “happy path” acceptance test • Identify at least one “negative” acceptance test • Story Size smaller than ”3” • Identify specific Subject Matter Expert / Customer • Review story details • Feedback from SME/Customer • Identify all tasks with hours (capacity planning) • Team commitment
  22. 22. Create Initial Definition of Ready Definition of Ready 1. Size less than 3 2. “As a user…” format 3. Completed Happy Path Acceptance Test Case 4. Title Identified for Negative Test Cases 5. Feedback from SME or Customer 6. Tasks with Hours 7. Team Commitment speed refining criteria sprint refining criteria sprint planning criteria = Definition of Ready + +
  23. 23. Visualize Your Process READY IN PROGRESS DONE Start with a Simple Kanban Board Add Columns on the LEFT
  24. 24. Visualize Your Process INBOX REFINE PLAN READY IN PROGRESS DONE SPEEDREFINING SPRINTREFINING SPRINTPLANNING Start EACH STORY in the Inbox SEARCH BY AIRPORT CHANGE SEATS Slowly CULTIVATE stories to “Ready” BACKLOG UPGRADE SEAT SELECT DIFFEREN T SEAT
  25. 25. Principle #3 The Sprint is for… SOLVING THE PROBLEM The purpose of “refining” before the sprint is to clarify the customer’s problem.
  26. 26. VISIONING REFINING definition of ready shared understanding THINKING effectiveness mindset Principles of Getting Ready PRINCIPLE #1 PRINCIPLE #2 PRINCIPLE #3 A team first needs to focus on becoming effective, then can worry about being efficient. A team discusses and cultivates user stories together to effectively build a shared understanding. The purpose of refining before the sprint is to clarify the customer’s problem. The Sprint is for solving the problem.
  27. 27. Ensure Sprint Success with Stories that are READY Steven Granese Director of Agile Consulting @sgranese Steven.Granese@AgileThought.com Q&A

×