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What is this?   This presentation is one of five presentations outlining our understanding of   Generational perspectives1...
The theory ofgenerations
introduction   Overview   How generations differ from lifestages   Identifying generations   Generations repeating the...
OverviewUnderstanding Generations is not an exact scienceThe boundaries between generations are blurredThe insights are no...
OverviewThere are five generations alive today1. The Silent Generation (Pensioners)2. Baby Boomers (Empty Nesters)        ...
How generations differfrom lifestages
Trains and stations•   Picture a lifecycle track, birth as the origin and death the destination•   There are a number of g...
Trains and stations•   Imagine phase of life stations arrived at during a different time in history•   The stations are:  ...
Key station: Coming of age•   Of all stations, the first is the most influential•   Coming of age: Childhood, adolescence ...
How does coming of age manifest inlater life?•   How children are raised affect how they later parent•   How students are ...
How are generations differentfrom lifestage?    Lifestages are transient Generational perspectives stay         with us fo...
How generations areidentified
Identifying generations: Age ranges                     Born           Youngest   Oldest  Generation Z       2001 - 2017? ...
The generations in the labour force
Identifying generations•   Each generation lasts between 15 – 20 years (the time it takes to come of    age)•   Each gener...
1. Common location      “History shapes each generation depending on      what phase of life it occupies as it encounters ...
Identifying generations: Common locationWhere the generation finds itself in history : a common historical location•   Gre...
2. Common beliefs and behaviours        “In 2001, 8.3 per cent (4.9 million) of the total      population of the UK were b...
Common beliefs and behaviours•   How a generation’s members are different from people born at another time•   Census repor...
3. Common perceived membership     “I can’t excuse what boomers did with sex and drugs                   when they were ki...
Identifying generations: Common    perceived membership     •   How the generation defines itself: the popular consensus a...
Generations repeatingthemselves
Archetypes•   Generations have been studied for hundreds of years•   Some sociologists believe generations come in four di...
Archetypes repeatingGenerations are cyclical: every fourth generation shares the characteristics as the firstSilent Genera...
Archetypes           Prophets                         Nomads   Values driven, moralistic,      Ratty, tough, unwanted,  se...
How do generations affectus?
National Mood•   Once a generation fully occupies the leadership role in midlife (Empty    Nester) it naturally reshapes t...
National Mood: Turnings•   What does history tell us about the mood of a nation?•   Sociologists see cycles of national mo...
Turnings: The characteristic mood of thenation                             Fourth turning: Crisis                         ...
The current national mood1980’s and early 90’s              late 90’s – 2015 (Fourth turning)Families were weak           ...
Summary•   Each generation has their own particular attitudes•   These directly affect the mood of a nation•   Knowledge o...
Presentation 1: The Generations Presentation 1 introduction
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Presentation 1: The Generations Presentation 1 introduction

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An introduction to the theory of generations. Originally prepared in 2006.

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Presentation 1: The Generations Presentation 1 introduction

  1. 1. What is this? This presentation is one of five presentations outlining our understanding of Generational perspectives1. The Theory of Generations2. Boomers3. Generation X4. Generation Y, or Millenials5. Applying generational perspectives to Marketing
  2. 2. The theory ofgenerations
  3. 3. introduction Overview How generations differ from lifestages Identifying generations Generations repeating themselves National Mood Summary
  4. 4. OverviewUnderstanding Generations is not an exact scienceThe boundaries between generations are blurredThe insights are not always clear cutThere are plenty of hypotheses
  5. 5. OverviewThere are five generations alive today1. The Silent Generation (Pensioners)2. Baby Boomers (Empty Nesters) Today we will uncover how these generations think and feel3. Generation X (Family) …And understand how we can market to them more effectively4. Generation Y (Youth)5. As yet un-named (Kids under 7yrs)
  6. 6. How generations differfrom lifestages
  7. 7. Trains and stations• Picture a lifecycle track, birth as the origin and death the destination• There are a number of generations, or trains, running at any one time• Some trains are just beginning• Some are reaching the end of the line• Each train carries passengers that are alike• But each train looks very different
  8. 8. Trains and stations• Imagine phase of life stations arrived at during a different time in history• The stations are:  Coming of age Youth  Rising Commonly known as life stages Family  Midlife Empty Nester  Elder Pensioner
  9. 9. Key station: Coming of age• Of all stations, the first is the most influential• Coming of age: Childhood, adolescence and early youth• At this station a set of collective behavioural traits, attitudes and beliefs have been formed• These ‘perspectives’ later express themselves throughout the rest of the journey
  10. 10. How does coming of age manifest inlater life?• How children are raised affect how they later parent• How students are taught affects how they learn• How young people are managed affects how they lead• How society feels about children affects their confidence• How they are sold to affects how they feel about corporations• How authorities operate affects how institutionalised they are
  11. 11. How are generations differentfrom lifestage? Lifestages are transient Generational perspectives stay with us for life
  12. 12. How generations areidentified
  13. 13. Identifying generations: Age ranges Born Youngest Oldest Generation Z 2001 - 2017? Not born 11 Generation Y 1981 – 2001 11 30 Generation X 1965 – 1981 30 46 Baby Boomers 1943 – 1965 46 68 Silent Generation 1925 – 1943 68 86 N.B Generational cohorts are estimates based on the wide range of estimates currently available
  14. 14. The generations in the labour force
  15. 15. Identifying generations• Each generation lasts between 15 – 20 years (the time it takes to come of age)• Each generation has an underlying ethos / persona• Three attributes can be used to identify it: 1. A generations common location in history 2. It’s common beliefs and behaviour 3. It’s common perceived membership
  16. 16. 1. Common location “History shapes each generation depending on what phase of life it occupies as it encounters key historical events - a period of crisis will leave an impression on children that is different from the one it leaves on midlife leaders ” Julian Marias
  17. 17. Identifying generations: Common locationWhere the generation finds itself in history : a common historical location• Greenham Common Nuclear protests (1983)  Silent Midlife (Empty Nester)  Boomers Rising (Family)  Generation X Were at this stage… Coming of age (Youth)  Generation Y …• Princess Diana Car Crash (1997)  Silent Elder (Pensioners)  Boomers Midlife (Empty Nester) Were at this stage…  Generation X Rising (Family)  Generation Y Coming of age (Youth)
  18. 18. 2. Common beliefs and behaviours “In 2001, 8.3 per cent (4.9 million) of the total population of the UK were born overseas. This is almost double the proportion in 1951 (4.2 per cent) ” ONS Population and Migration Archive
  19. 19. Common beliefs and behaviours• How a generation’s members are different from people born at another time• Census reports, opinion surveys, educational tests, crime records• Provide evidence of beliefs and behaviours  careers  children  gender roles  financial security  marriage  materialism  culture
  20. 20. 3. Common perceived membership “I can’t excuse what boomers did with sex and drugs when they were kids ” Michael Eliason, 17, Millennials Rising
  21. 21. Identifying generations: Common perceived membership • How the generation defines itself: the popular consensus aligned to • The sense of direction and popular belief Baby Boomers see Generation X have Generation Y arethemselves on a mission of come to expect little conservative and feel vision and values of the world optimistic
  22. 22. Generations repeatingthemselves
  23. 23. Archetypes• Generations have been studied for hundreds of years• Some sociologists believe generations come in four different archetypes• These are defined as Prophet, Nomad, Hero and Artist• These have reappeared throughout history since the 15th century
  24. 24. Archetypes repeatingGenerations are cyclical: every fourth generation shares the characteristics as the firstSilent Generation Retired ‘Artists’ Baby Boomers Working, retiring Prophets Generation X Parenting Nomads Generation Y Young adults, teens Heroes Generation Z Young children ‘Artists’
  25. 25. Archetypes Prophets Nomads Values driven, moralistic, Ratty, tough, unwanted, self absorbed and crusaders diverse, adventurous, cynical Boomers Generation X Heroes Conventional, powerful, Artists institutionally driven, Subtle, indecisive, emotional, trust authority compromising, repressive Generation Y Silent Generation Source: Strauss & Howe
  26. 26. How do generations affectus?
  27. 27. National Mood• Once a generation fully occupies the leadership role in midlife (Empty Nester) it naturally reshapes the social environment and dictates national mood• Currently we are being led by Baby Boomers• Increasingly Generation X are becoming influential
  28. 28. National Mood: Turnings• What does history tell us about the mood of a nation?• Sociologists see cycles of national mood that repeat themselves again and again• These cycles are sometimes referred to as Turnings
  29. 29. Turnings: The characteristic mood of thenation Fourth turning: Crisis We are in the Solid public consensus, support fourth turning, of authority, clampdown on bad moving toward the conduct, overprotective child first turning rearing, optimismThird Turning: Unravelling First turning: High Pragmatism, self-reliance, Follows a crisis…Friendly, poor family structure, indulgent child rearing, weakening civic habits, low contentment, order and public trust, pessimism consensus Second Turning: Awakening A challenge to highs assumptions, new spiritual agendas, soul over science, public order deteriorates, crime rises, families weakening
  30. 30. The current national mood1980’s and early 90’s late 90’s – 2015 (Fourth turning)Families were weak Families are now strengtheningChild rearing was tightening Child rearing is overprotectiveGender roles were tight Gender roles are wideningIdeals were debated Ideals are being championedInstitutions were eroded Institutions are being foundedCulture was cynical Culture is now practicalSocial structure was diversified Social structure is settlingWorldview was complex Worldview is simplifyingSocial priority was individual Social priority is communityVision of future was darkening Vision of future is brightening
  31. 31. Summary• Each generation has their own particular attitudes• These directly affect the mood of a nation• Knowledge of a generations attitudes, beliefs and the corresponding national mood can augment lifestage and demographic insights• For the remainder of the day we will concentrate on three key targets, their childhood and how they operate in the world  Boomers  Generation X  Generation Y

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