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Assessing the value of the
supply chain
Overview of the methodology
Contents
The goals of Supply Chain Management (SCM) 1
The scope of SCM 2
Why now? 3
Key questions 4
Value for shareholders 4
Summary 5
Functional scope 5
Activity scope 6
Methodology 6
Performance bridge 7
Components 8
Outcomes 8
Collinson Grant 9
1Assesing the value of the supply chain
The goals of Supply Chain Management (SCM)
Leading companies are exploiting their supply chains to outperform
competitors:
to achieve performance that creates more value for shareholders
to re-define processes and structures to eliminate costs
to harmonise systems and technologies to exploit synergies and reduce
costs
to generate transformational and iterative change
to establish collaborative relationships to support e-commerce
to maintain the prices and margins of products, despite severe
pressure
to promote high performance, end-to-end visibility, customisation and
lower costs
to manage complexity in a network of businesses and achieve
international consistency
to foster a world-class image and uniqueness to protect lagging market
capitalisation.
2
The scope of SCM
Effective SCM should align and control interactions between the buying and selling sides.
3Assesing the value of the supply chain
Business environmentCurrent market development
Static
Stable
Dynamic
Unstable
Traditional Business
Environment
The
Future
What flexibility do you have to
respond to frequent changes in
the supply chain
Can you exploit that freedom?
Can you react to customers’
short-term demands?
Better responsiveness
and use of assets
Are metrics and processes
aligned to maximise overall
profitability?
Are tools to support decision-
making used to improve
profitability?
Market / operating conditions
Cost efficiency
Market / operating conditions
Businessenvironment
Business environmentCurrent market development
Static
Stable
Dynamic
Unstable
Traditional Business
Environment
The
Future
What flexibility do you have to
respond to frequent changes in
the supply chain
Can you exploit that freedom?
Can you react to customers’
short-term demands?
Better responsiveness
and use of assets
Are metrics and processes
aligned to maximise overall
profitability?
Are tools to support decision-
making used to improve
profitability?
Market / operating conditions
Cost efficiency
Market / operating conditions
Businessenvironment
Why now?
The unstable business environment and dynamic operating conditions require that clients improve responsiveness and
reduce costs.
Current market development
Businessenvironment
Market/operating conditions
4
Key questions
The main aim of the assessment is to work out the financial value to your organisation of the performance of SCM. This
will require answers to the following questions:
What are the current capabilities for managing and planning SCM?
What are the current baseline costs, and the measures of and benchmarks for performance?
What are the current problems and opportunities in SCM?
What improvements could be made and how would these affect the measures of performance and benchmarks?
What is the financial value of improving performance?
What is the high-level implementation plan, showing the tasks necessary to achieve the improvements and realize
the benefits?
Value for shareholders
The supply chain has a big effect on value for shareholders.
Revenue
Costs
Working
capital
Fixed capital
Value for
shareholders
Profitability
Invested
capital
The shareholder value tree
Cost of goods sold (COGS)
Productivity of assets
Cost of business operations
Costs of manufacturing, conversion and
sourcing
10 - 15%
costs
Inventories of raw, part-finished and
finished products
Order-to-cash cycle time
10 - 20%
inventory
Physical assets
- Plants, warehouses, trucks, office
and support locations
10 - 20%
assets
Market share
Gross margins
Service to customers
Fewer lost sales
1 - 2%
margin
Typical targeted
benefits
Impact on supply chain
Revenue
Costs
Working
capital
Fixed capital
Value for
shareholders
Profitability
Invested
capital
The shareholder value tree
Cost of goods sold (COGS)
Productivity of assets
Cost of business operations
Costs of manufacturing, conversion and
sourcing
10 - 15%
costs
Inventories of raw, part-finished and
finished products
Order-to-cash cycle time
10 - 20%
inventory
Physical assets
- Plants, warehouses, trucks, office
and support locations
10 - 20%
assets
Market share
Gross margins
Service to customers
Fewer lost sales
1 - 2%
margin
Typical targeted
benefits
Impact on supply chain
5Assesing the value of the supply chain
Summary
The Supply Chain Value Assessment (SCVA) sets out the capabilities required of the supply chain for organisations to be
successful.
The SCVA focuses on finding opportunities to increase value in operations.
SCVA connects the organisation’s objectives, supply chain capabilities and key performance indicators together to
produce fact-based, value propositions.
Analysis of leading practices is used to help find opportunities. SCVA does not aim to produce standard
benchmarks.
SCVA is not generic. It is customised to each business’s situation and objectives.
Functional scope
Value assessment can cover:
Procurement
Manufacturing and assembly
The management of inventory and materials
Warehousing
Transportation
Order fulfilment
Logistics operations that add value
Service and support
Projects.
What affects me? How will the trends
affect my business
operations?
What capabilities
must I have?
What are the
leaders doing?
How much is
changing worth?
Sector
trends
Supply
chain
capabilities
Business
impacts
Leading
practices
Value
propositions
What affects me? How will the trends
affect my business
operations?
What capabilities
must I have?
What are the
leaders doing?
How much is
changing worth?
Sector
trends
Supply
chain
capabilities
Business
impacts
Leading
practices
Value
propositions
6
Activity scope
SCVA assesses business practices in the supply chain in several different dimensions.
Methodology
SCVA will find the major opportunities to draw up a business case for change.
Sourcing and
procurement
Logistics and
service operations
Demand/supply
planning
Customer
Segmentation
Service
Services/ products
Planning, optimization and
detailed scheduling of SC
functions:
Managing demand
Managing inventory
Managing logistics
Managing labour
Managing procurement
Managing production
Improving operational
performance
Selecting vendors
Managing vendors of
logistics
Managing freight
Managing the
Rail/Air/Marine fleet
Strategic
procurement
eProcurement
Managing suppliers
Procurement process
Categories of business process
Information
technology
Performance
measurement
Collaboration/
extend. enter.
Use of performance
measures
Overall IT enablement
Supply chain technology
Supply chain visibility and event
management
mCommerce
Collaborating with partners
Collaborating with suppliers and
customers
Supply chain spanning categories
Supply chain
network
Physical network -
configuration and
optimisation
Plants
Warehouses
Service locations
Offices
Sourcing and
procurement
Logistics and
service operations
Demand/supply
planning
Customer
Segmentation
Service
Services/ products
Planning, optimization and
detailed scheduling of SC
functions:
Managing demand
Managing inventory
Managing logistics
Managing labour
Managing procurement
Managing production
Improving operational
performance
Selecting vendors
Managing vendors of
logistics
Managing freight
Managing the
Rail/Air/Marine fleet
Strategic
procurement
eProcurement
Managing suppliers
Procurement process
Categories of business process
Information
technology
Performance
measurement
Collaboration/
extend. enter.
Use of performance
measures
Overall IT enablement
Supply chain technology
Supply chain visibility and event
management
mCommerce
Collaborating with partners
Collaborating with suppliers and
customers
Supply chain spanning categories
Supply chain
network
Physical network -
configuration and
optimisation
Plants
Warehouses
Service locations
Offices
The process of SCVA
Assess RecommendPrepare Identify
Mobilize
team
Quantitative
data
Performance
gaps
Presentation
and review
Current
performance
Levers and
recommen-
dations
Qualitative
data
Value
proposition
Targets and
expectations
Capabilities
Opportunities
Scope and
approach
Executive Review
0 21 3
Steering Review
NB: The timeframe for the value process will vary with the scope (at geographic, functional
and activity levels)
The process of SCVA
Assess RecommendPrepare Identify
Mobilize
team
Quantitative
data
Performance
gaps
Presentation
and review
Current
performance
Levers and
recommen-
dations
Qualitative
data
Value
proposition
Targets and
expectations
Capabilities
Opportunities
Scope and
approach
Executive Review
0 21 3
Steering Review
NB: The timeframe for the value process will vary with the scope (at geographic, functional
and activity levels)
7Assesing the value of the supply chain
Performance bridge
We use a performance bridge to clarify the findings about the value chain. This:
is adaptable and straightforward
can be used for static data or time series
can mix negative and positive financials
can be used qualitatively to show positive and negative factors, or where value is created and where it is
destroyed.
The starting point is the top (or bottom) of each bar, moving left to right.
400 -450
Net
revenue
Cost of
goods
sold
Capital
sale
Loss before
interest and tax
Overheads
-60 -110 40
Interest
Income
100 -10 20
Taxes
Net
profit
400 -450
Net
revenue
Cost of
goods
sold
Capital
sale
Loss before
interest and tax
Overheads
-60 -110 40
Interest
Income
100 -10 20
Taxes
Net
profit
400 -450
Net
revenue
Cost of
goods
sold
400 -450
Net
revenue
Cost of
goods
sold
Capital
sale
Loss before
interest and tax
Overheads
-60 -110 40
Interest
Income
100 -10 20
Taxes
Net
profit
Capital
sale
Loss before
interest and tax
Overheads
-60 -110 40
Interest
Income
100 -10 20
Taxes
Net
profit
8
Components
Components of the value assessment are:
Qualitative surveys – to define the relevant problems and opportunities
Diagnostic tools – to help understand the problems and define the opportunity
Quantitative assessment – to define the financial value
Sector benchmarks – to evaluate the impact of improvements in performance
High-level roadmap for implementation - option.
Outcomes
A qualitative assessment questionnaire can be employed to provide a top-down analysis to create a view of current
capabilities.
Capability Radar
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Supply Chain Alignment
Customer Connectivity
Efficient Distribution
Demand Driven Planning
Lean Manufacturing
Supplier Management
Integrated SystemsAdvanced Information Technologies
Integrated Product Development
Outcome-Focused
Performance Measurement
Teamwork
Aligned Organisation Structure
Execution of Change Plans
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Supply Chain Alignment
Customer Connectivity
Efficient Distribution
Demand Driven Planning
Lean Manufacturing
Supplier Management
Integrated SystemsAdvanced Information Technologies
Integrated Product Development
Outcome-Focused
Performance Measurement
Teamwork
Aligned Organisation Structure
Execution of Change Plans
Management
Operations
Opportunity matrix
Expected BenefitLow High
Easy
Complex
Easeofimplementation
• Consignment stock
• Monitor X% reserve
requirement
• Capture stock out
information
• Manage service level
• Forecast lifting for terminal
• Optimize boned stock
• Monitor Product Profitability
• Joint venture (purchase
inventory from the joint
venture partner
• Rationalize terminal
• Schedule discharging at
terminal
• B/L and swap
arrangement
• Disposition strategy
• Monitor product profitability
• Increase supply sale
• Capture in-transit volume
Illustrative
9Assesing the value of the supply chain
The aggregated benefits will form the basis of an integrated plan for implementation and a business case. For example:
Legislated reserve x.x x.x
In-transit volume x.x x.x
Optimize bonded stock at refinery x.x x.x
Optimize Replenishment Cycle x.x x.x
Reduce demand variability by customer segmentation x.x x.x
Improve customer service level x.x x.x
Monitor Product Profitability x.x x.x
B/L & Swap Arrangement x.x x.x
List of Opportunities Potential Value
Note :
1) Estimate benefit are based on average inventroy level in 1998 assuming that refinery has
avaliable capacity to keep as a bonded stock
2) Assume that the contraint on vessel avalibility can be managed and forecast accuracy are
improved by 50 %
3) Safety stock reduction is limited to the 3% reserve level if inventory is at 3% reserve level benefit
of the opportunity may be be realised
4) Opportunity identified during the course of analyses
First year Annual
Opportunity
Area
Inventory
Shipping costs
Trucking costs
Contribution Margin
How to realise the benefits
Managing to safety stock targets, which are statistically set to reflect
actual, uncontrollable variability in demand and supply; releasing tank
heels of excess tanks
Changing drop routes and vessel sizes to optimise per unit costs
(accounting for impacts on average inventory); eliminating spot
vessel costs incurred as supplementary to replenishment by time-
chartered vessel
Using larger trucks and enabling ease of operations through efficient
scheduling to achieve better haulage rates (may require some
renegotiation of contracts)
Reallocating resources within customer segments to match customer
value; margin management imperatives in stock allocation and times
of critical supply; retaining/ acquiring more customers through supply
chain efficiency, guaranteeing service levels and managing customer
relationships; better price-related trading vs marketing decisions
Value
(% of baseline)
17 - 21%
8 - 12%
2 - 5%
0.6 - 2%
Q3’99 Q4’99 Q1’00 Q2’00
Benefit Capture
Q3’00 Q4’00
Roll out Initiative
Benefit Capture Q2’99
- -
0.23
0.88 0.88
0.45
0.24
Supply Planning Performance
1)
2)
3)
.
.
.
.
.
>> Program management
Total Savings by Quarter
( Million US$)
Internal Man-day
External Man-day
Benefits
Aggregate benefits
Implementation and
delivery
IllustrativeLegislated reserve x.x x.x
In-transit volume x.x x.x
Optimize bonded stock at refinery x.x x.x
Optimize Replenishment Cycle x.x x.x
Reduce demand variability by customer segmentation x.x x.x
Improve customer service level x.x x.x
Monitor Product Profitability x.x x.x
B/L & Swap Arrangement x.x x.x
List of Opportunities Potential Value
Note :
1) Estimate benefit are based on average inventroy level in 1998 assuming that refinery has
avaliable capacity to keep as a bonded stock
2) Assume that the contraint on vessel avalibility can be managed and forecast accuracy are
improved by 50 %
3) Safety stock reduction is limited to the 3% reserve level if inventory is at 3% reserve level benefit
of the opportunity may be be realised
4) Opportunity identified during the course of analyses
First year Annual
Opportunity
Area
Inventory
Shipping costs
Trucking costs
Contribution Margin
How to realise the benefits
Managing to safety stock targets, which are statistically set to reflect
actual, uncontrollable variability in demand and supply; releasing tank
heels of excess tanks
Changing drop routes and vessel sizes to optimise per unit costs
(accounting for impacts on average inventory); eliminating spot
vessel costs incurred as supplementary to replenishment by time-
chartered vessel
Using larger trucks and enabling ease of operations through efficient
scheduling to achieve better haulage rates (may require some
renegotiation of contracts)
Reallocating resources within customer segments to match customer
value; margin management imperatives in stock allocation and times
of critical supply; retaining/ acquiring more customers through supply
chain efficiency, guaranteeing service levels and managing customer
relationships; better price-related trading vs marketing decisions
Value
(% of baseline)
17 - 21%
8 - 12%
2 - 5%
0.6 - 2%
Q3’99 Q4’99 Q1’00 Q2’00
Benefit Capture
Q3’00 Q4’00
Roll out Initiative
Benefit Capture Q2’99
- -
0.23
0.88 0.88
0.45
0.24
Supply Planning Performance
1)
2)
3)
.
.
.
.
.
>> Program management
Total Savings by Quarter
( Million US$)
Internal Man-day
External Man-day
Benefits
Aggregate benefits
Implementation and
delivery
Illustrative
10
Collinson Grant
Collinson Grant is a management consultancy with a history of profitable
growth. We help large organisations all over Europe and in the United States
to restructure, merge acquisitions, cut costs, increase performance and profit,
and manage people. By building long-term relationships, we have kept some
clients for thirty years.
Our emphasis is on implementation, results and value-for-money. We expect
to give a substantial return on the investment in us. So we do not recommend
action unless we are sure that the outcome will be worth it. We are not afraid
to give bad news, or to champion ideas that may not be welcome.
Most of our work is on three themes – organisation, costs and people. We
use this simple framework to manage complex assignments - often with an
international dimension - and to support managers on smaller, more focused
projects. We help them:
to restructure and integrate - following acquisitions or to improve
profits
to improve the supply chain. We examine every process and interface
to improve efficiency and service
to set up financial and managerial controls. We create robust systems
to improve decision-making and reduce risks
to refine business processes and introduce lean manufacturing. We
analyse and improve how work is done, and use new ways to create
change and make it stick
to cut costs. We make systematic analyses of overheads, direct costs,
and the profitability of customers and products. This helps managers
to understand complexity, and to take firm steps to reduce it
to manage people. We draw up pay schemes and put them into effect,
guide managers on employee relations and employment law,get better
performance from people, and manage redundancy.
Collinson Grant Limited
Ryecroft, Aviary Road,Worsley, Manchester, M28 2WF United Kingdom
Telephone (0) 161 703 5600 Facsimile (0) 161 790 9177
33 St James’s Square London SW1Y 4JS
Telephone (0)20 7661 9382 Facsimile (0)20 7661 9400
En France 03 20 65 18 81 Innerhalb Deutschlands 0211 4054 800
In the United States 1 508 358 3400
Web www.collinsongrant.com
Part of Collinson Grant Group Limited

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Assessing the value of the supply chain

  • 1. Assessing the value of the supply chain Overview of the methodology
  • 2.
  • 3. Contents The goals of Supply Chain Management (SCM) 1 The scope of SCM 2 Why now? 3 Key questions 4 Value for shareholders 4 Summary 5 Functional scope 5 Activity scope 6 Methodology 6 Performance bridge 7 Components 8 Outcomes 8 Collinson Grant 9
  • 4.
  • 5. 1Assesing the value of the supply chain The goals of Supply Chain Management (SCM) Leading companies are exploiting their supply chains to outperform competitors: to achieve performance that creates more value for shareholders to re-define processes and structures to eliminate costs to harmonise systems and technologies to exploit synergies and reduce costs to generate transformational and iterative change to establish collaborative relationships to support e-commerce to maintain the prices and margins of products, despite severe pressure to promote high performance, end-to-end visibility, customisation and lower costs to manage complexity in a network of businesses and achieve international consistency to foster a world-class image and uniqueness to protect lagging market capitalisation.
  • 6. 2 The scope of SCM Effective SCM should align and control interactions between the buying and selling sides.
  • 7. 3Assesing the value of the supply chain Business environmentCurrent market development Static Stable Dynamic Unstable Traditional Business Environment The Future What flexibility do you have to respond to frequent changes in the supply chain Can you exploit that freedom? Can you react to customers’ short-term demands? Better responsiveness and use of assets Are metrics and processes aligned to maximise overall profitability? Are tools to support decision- making used to improve profitability? Market / operating conditions Cost efficiency Market / operating conditions Businessenvironment Business environmentCurrent market development Static Stable Dynamic Unstable Traditional Business Environment The Future What flexibility do you have to respond to frequent changes in the supply chain Can you exploit that freedom? Can you react to customers’ short-term demands? Better responsiveness and use of assets Are metrics and processes aligned to maximise overall profitability? Are tools to support decision- making used to improve profitability? Market / operating conditions Cost efficiency Market / operating conditions Businessenvironment Why now? The unstable business environment and dynamic operating conditions require that clients improve responsiveness and reduce costs. Current market development Businessenvironment Market/operating conditions
  • 8. 4 Key questions The main aim of the assessment is to work out the financial value to your organisation of the performance of SCM. This will require answers to the following questions: What are the current capabilities for managing and planning SCM? What are the current baseline costs, and the measures of and benchmarks for performance? What are the current problems and opportunities in SCM? What improvements could be made and how would these affect the measures of performance and benchmarks? What is the financial value of improving performance? What is the high-level implementation plan, showing the tasks necessary to achieve the improvements and realize the benefits? Value for shareholders The supply chain has a big effect on value for shareholders. Revenue Costs Working capital Fixed capital Value for shareholders Profitability Invested capital The shareholder value tree Cost of goods sold (COGS) Productivity of assets Cost of business operations Costs of manufacturing, conversion and sourcing 10 - 15% costs Inventories of raw, part-finished and finished products Order-to-cash cycle time 10 - 20% inventory Physical assets - Plants, warehouses, trucks, office and support locations 10 - 20% assets Market share Gross margins Service to customers Fewer lost sales 1 - 2% margin Typical targeted benefits Impact on supply chain Revenue Costs Working capital Fixed capital Value for shareholders Profitability Invested capital The shareholder value tree Cost of goods sold (COGS) Productivity of assets Cost of business operations Costs of manufacturing, conversion and sourcing 10 - 15% costs Inventories of raw, part-finished and finished products Order-to-cash cycle time 10 - 20% inventory Physical assets - Plants, warehouses, trucks, office and support locations 10 - 20% assets Market share Gross margins Service to customers Fewer lost sales 1 - 2% margin Typical targeted benefits Impact on supply chain
  • 9. 5Assesing the value of the supply chain Summary The Supply Chain Value Assessment (SCVA) sets out the capabilities required of the supply chain for organisations to be successful. The SCVA focuses on finding opportunities to increase value in operations. SCVA connects the organisation’s objectives, supply chain capabilities and key performance indicators together to produce fact-based, value propositions. Analysis of leading practices is used to help find opportunities. SCVA does not aim to produce standard benchmarks. SCVA is not generic. It is customised to each business’s situation and objectives. Functional scope Value assessment can cover: Procurement Manufacturing and assembly The management of inventory and materials Warehousing Transportation Order fulfilment Logistics operations that add value Service and support Projects. What affects me? How will the trends affect my business operations? What capabilities must I have? What are the leaders doing? How much is changing worth? Sector trends Supply chain capabilities Business impacts Leading practices Value propositions What affects me? How will the trends affect my business operations? What capabilities must I have? What are the leaders doing? How much is changing worth? Sector trends Supply chain capabilities Business impacts Leading practices Value propositions
  • 10. 6 Activity scope SCVA assesses business practices in the supply chain in several different dimensions. Methodology SCVA will find the major opportunities to draw up a business case for change. Sourcing and procurement Logistics and service operations Demand/supply planning Customer Segmentation Service Services/ products Planning, optimization and detailed scheduling of SC functions: Managing demand Managing inventory Managing logistics Managing labour Managing procurement Managing production Improving operational performance Selecting vendors Managing vendors of logistics Managing freight Managing the Rail/Air/Marine fleet Strategic procurement eProcurement Managing suppliers Procurement process Categories of business process Information technology Performance measurement Collaboration/ extend. enter. Use of performance measures Overall IT enablement Supply chain technology Supply chain visibility and event management mCommerce Collaborating with partners Collaborating with suppliers and customers Supply chain spanning categories Supply chain network Physical network - configuration and optimisation Plants Warehouses Service locations Offices Sourcing and procurement Logistics and service operations Demand/supply planning Customer Segmentation Service Services/ products Planning, optimization and detailed scheduling of SC functions: Managing demand Managing inventory Managing logistics Managing labour Managing procurement Managing production Improving operational performance Selecting vendors Managing vendors of logistics Managing freight Managing the Rail/Air/Marine fleet Strategic procurement eProcurement Managing suppliers Procurement process Categories of business process Information technology Performance measurement Collaboration/ extend. enter. Use of performance measures Overall IT enablement Supply chain technology Supply chain visibility and event management mCommerce Collaborating with partners Collaborating with suppliers and customers Supply chain spanning categories Supply chain network Physical network - configuration and optimisation Plants Warehouses Service locations Offices The process of SCVA Assess RecommendPrepare Identify Mobilize team Quantitative data Performance gaps Presentation and review Current performance Levers and recommen- dations Qualitative data Value proposition Targets and expectations Capabilities Opportunities Scope and approach Executive Review 0 21 3 Steering Review NB: The timeframe for the value process will vary with the scope (at geographic, functional and activity levels) The process of SCVA Assess RecommendPrepare Identify Mobilize team Quantitative data Performance gaps Presentation and review Current performance Levers and recommen- dations Qualitative data Value proposition Targets and expectations Capabilities Opportunities Scope and approach Executive Review 0 21 3 Steering Review NB: The timeframe for the value process will vary with the scope (at geographic, functional and activity levels)
  • 11. 7Assesing the value of the supply chain Performance bridge We use a performance bridge to clarify the findings about the value chain. This: is adaptable and straightforward can be used for static data or time series can mix negative and positive financials can be used qualitatively to show positive and negative factors, or where value is created and where it is destroyed. The starting point is the top (or bottom) of each bar, moving left to right. 400 -450 Net revenue Cost of goods sold Capital sale Loss before interest and tax Overheads -60 -110 40 Interest Income 100 -10 20 Taxes Net profit 400 -450 Net revenue Cost of goods sold Capital sale Loss before interest and tax Overheads -60 -110 40 Interest Income 100 -10 20 Taxes Net profit 400 -450 Net revenue Cost of goods sold 400 -450 Net revenue Cost of goods sold Capital sale Loss before interest and tax Overheads -60 -110 40 Interest Income 100 -10 20 Taxes Net profit Capital sale Loss before interest and tax Overheads -60 -110 40 Interest Income 100 -10 20 Taxes Net profit
  • 12. 8 Components Components of the value assessment are: Qualitative surveys – to define the relevant problems and opportunities Diagnostic tools – to help understand the problems and define the opportunity Quantitative assessment – to define the financial value Sector benchmarks – to evaluate the impact of improvements in performance High-level roadmap for implementation - option. Outcomes A qualitative assessment questionnaire can be employed to provide a top-down analysis to create a view of current capabilities. Capability Radar 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Supply Chain Alignment Customer Connectivity Efficient Distribution Demand Driven Planning Lean Manufacturing Supplier Management Integrated SystemsAdvanced Information Technologies Integrated Product Development Outcome-Focused Performance Measurement Teamwork Aligned Organisation Structure Execution of Change Plans 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Supply Chain Alignment Customer Connectivity Efficient Distribution Demand Driven Planning Lean Manufacturing Supplier Management Integrated SystemsAdvanced Information Technologies Integrated Product Development Outcome-Focused Performance Measurement Teamwork Aligned Organisation Structure Execution of Change Plans Management Operations Opportunity matrix Expected BenefitLow High Easy Complex Easeofimplementation • Consignment stock • Monitor X% reserve requirement • Capture stock out information • Manage service level • Forecast lifting for terminal • Optimize boned stock • Monitor Product Profitability • Joint venture (purchase inventory from the joint venture partner • Rationalize terminal • Schedule discharging at terminal • B/L and swap arrangement • Disposition strategy • Monitor product profitability • Increase supply sale • Capture in-transit volume Illustrative
  • 13. 9Assesing the value of the supply chain The aggregated benefits will form the basis of an integrated plan for implementation and a business case. For example: Legislated reserve x.x x.x In-transit volume x.x x.x Optimize bonded stock at refinery x.x x.x Optimize Replenishment Cycle x.x x.x Reduce demand variability by customer segmentation x.x x.x Improve customer service level x.x x.x Monitor Product Profitability x.x x.x B/L & Swap Arrangement x.x x.x List of Opportunities Potential Value Note : 1) Estimate benefit are based on average inventroy level in 1998 assuming that refinery has avaliable capacity to keep as a bonded stock 2) Assume that the contraint on vessel avalibility can be managed and forecast accuracy are improved by 50 % 3) Safety stock reduction is limited to the 3% reserve level if inventory is at 3% reserve level benefit of the opportunity may be be realised 4) Opportunity identified during the course of analyses First year Annual Opportunity Area Inventory Shipping costs Trucking costs Contribution Margin How to realise the benefits Managing to safety stock targets, which are statistically set to reflect actual, uncontrollable variability in demand and supply; releasing tank heels of excess tanks Changing drop routes and vessel sizes to optimise per unit costs (accounting for impacts on average inventory); eliminating spot vessel costs incurred as supplementary to replenishment by time- chartered vessel Using larger trucks and enabling ease of operations through efficient scheduling to achieve better haulage rates (may require some renegotiation of contracts) Reallocating resources within customer segments to match customer value; margin management imperatives in stock allocation and times of critical supply; retaining/ acquiring more customers through supply chain efficiency, guaranteeing service levels and managing customer relationships; better price-related trading vs marketing decisions Value (% of baseline) 17 - 21% 8 - 12% 2 - 5% 0.6 - 2% Q3’99 Q4’99 Q1’00 Q2’00 Benefit Capture Q3’00 Q4’00 Roll out Initiative Benefit Capture Q2’99 - - 0.23 0.88 0.88 0.45 0.24 Supply Planning Performance 1) 2) 3) . . . . . >> Program management Total Savings by Quarter ( Million US$) Internal Man-day External Man-day Benefits Aggregate benefits Implementation and delivery IllustrativeLegislated reserve x.x x.x In-transit volume x.x x.x Optimize bonded stock at refinery x.x x.x Optimize Replenishment Cycle x.x x.x Reduce demand variability by customer segmentation x.x x.x Improve customer service level x.x x.x Monitor Product Profitability x.x x.x B/L & Swap Arrangement x.x x.x List of Opportunities Potential Value Note : 1) Estimate benefit are based on average inventroy level in 1998 assuming that refinery has avaliable capacity to keep as a bonded stock 2) Assume that the contraint on vessel avalibility can be managed and forecast accuracy are improved by 50 % 3) Safety stock reduction is limited to the 3% reserve level if inventory is at 3% reserve level benefit of the opportunity may be be realised 4) Opportunity identified during the course of analyses First year Annual Opportunity Area Inventory Shipping costs Trucking costs Contribution Margin How to realise the benefits Managing to safety stock targets, which are statistically set to reflect actual, uncontrollable variability in demand and supply; releasing tank heels of excess tanks Changing drop routes and vessel sizes to optimise per unit costs (accounting for impacts on average inventory); eliminating spot vessel costs incurred as supplementary to replenishment by time- chartered vessel Using larger trucks and enabling ease of operations through efficient scheduling to achieve better haulage rates (may require some renegotiation of contracts) Reallocating resources within customer segments to match customer value; margin management imperatives in stock allocation and times of critical supply; retaining/ acquiring more customers through supply chain efficiency, guaranteeing service levels and managing customer relationships; better price-related trading vs marketing decisions Value (% of baseline) 17 - 21% 8 - 12% 2 - 5% 0.6 - 2% Q3’99 Q4’99 Q1’00 Q2’00 Benefit Capture Q3’00 Q4’00 Roll out Initiative Benefit Capture Q2’99 - - 0.23 0.88 0.88 0.45 0.24 Supply Planning Performance 1) 2) 3) . . . . . >> Program management Total Savings by Quarter ( Million US$) Internal Man-day External Man-day Benefits Aggregate benefits Implementation and delivery Illustrative
  • 14. 10 Collinson Grant Collinson Grant is a management consultancy with a history of profitable growth. We help large organisations all over Europe and in the United States to restructure, merge acquisitions, cut costs, increase performance and profit, and manage people. By building long-term relationships, we have kept some clients for thirty years. Our emphasis is on implementation, results and value-for-money. We expect to give a substantial return on the investment in us. So we do not recommend action unless we are sure that the outcome will be worth it. We are not afraid to give bad news, or to champion ideas that may not be welcome. Most of our work is on three themes – organisation, costs and people. We use this simple framework to manage complex assignments - often with an international dimension - and to support managers on smaller, more focused projects. We help them: to restructure and integrate - following acquisitions or to improve profits to improve the supply chain. We examine every process and interface to improve efficiency and service to set up financial and managerial controls. We create robust systems to improve decision-making and reduce risks to refine business processes and introduce lean manufacturing. We analyse and improve how work is done, and use new ways to create change and make it stick to cut costs. We make systematic analyses of overheads, direct costs, and the profitability of customers and products. This helps managers to understand complexity, and to take firm steps to reduce it to manage people. We draw up pay schemes and put them into effect, guide managers on employee relations and employment law,get better performance from people, and manage redundancy.
  • 15. Collinson Grant Limited Ryecroft, Aviary Road,Worsley, Manchester, M28 2WF United Kingdom Telephone (0) 161 703 5600 Facsimile (0) 161 790 9177 33 St James’s Square London SW1Y 4JS Telephone (0)20 7661 9382 Facsimile (0)20 7661 9400 En France 03 20 65 18 81 Innerhalb Deutschlands 0211 4054 800 In the United States 1 508 358 3400 Web www.collinsongrant.com Part of Collinson Grant Group Limited