James paul gee powerpoint

1,074 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,074
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

James paul gee powerpoint

  1. 1. JAMES PAUL GEE Created by: Melanie Sterling
  2. 2. Who is he?  Instructor at University of Wisconsin  Affiliate faculty member of Games, Learning, and Society group.  Member of National Academy of Education
  3. 3. Good Video Games & Good Learning  Researches ways to incorporate technology into children’s learning.  Believes gaming strategies can be used in education.  Engagement and challenge of video games and it’s transfer to education.  Video games are “Long, hard, and complex” but still enjoyable.
  4. 4. Fifteen Principles  Identity  Interaction  Production  Risk Taking  Customization  Agency  Well-Ordered Problems  Challenge and Consolidation
  5. 5. Fifteen Principles cont.  “Just-in-Time” and “On Demand”  Situated Meanings  Pleasantly Frustrating  System Thinking  Explore, Think Laterally, Rethink Goals  Smart Tools and Distributed Knowledge  Cross-Functional Teams
  6. 6.  Identity: Players fully commit themselves to the role.  Interaction: Players form gaming strategies based on interactions with other players or characters.  Production: Players experience the game based on their own decisions. Essentially, each player produces their own game.
  7. 7.  Risk-taking: Good video games lower the consequences caused from failure. Risks are encouraged.  Customization: Games provide different difficulty levels and allow players to solve problems in different ways.  Agency: Players gain a sense of ownership.
  8. 8.  Well-Ordered Problems: Problems players face are built to lead players to form strategies that will work later, on harder problems.  Challenge and Consolidation: Games allow players to gain mastery, then requires them to learn something new and consolidate their skills.  “Just-in-Time” and “On Demand”: Games give verbal commands versus written.
  9. 9.  Situated Meanings: Games always situate meanings of words in terms of actions, images and dialogue.  Pleasantly Frustrating: Game are “doable” but challenging.  System Thinking: Games encourage players to think about relationships, not isolated events.
  10. 10.  Explore, Think Literally, Rethink Goals: Games encourage players to explore thoroughly before moving on, thinking laterally not just linearly.  Smart Tools and Distributed Knowledge: Players often work with other characters to complete the game, knowledge and tools are shared.  Cross-Functional Teams: Many games require players to be apart of multiplayer

×