Politics of Formal Water Management and  Sustainability Concerns in Peri-urban Delhi  STEPS Centre, University of Sussex C...
<ul><li>For or against water reforms (public vs private) (Mishra and Goldar 2008;  Hall and Lobina 2007;  Ranganathan et a...
<ul><li>Do not engage deeply with understanding the complex interactions between formal policies, technical interventions,...
<ul><li>Peri-urban water management is an outcome of complex interaction between actors, policies, technical interventions...
Case Study Area Map of India Ghaziabad Delhi
<ul><li>Constituted of plethora of government agencies at different scales within and beyond water sector –either minimal ...
<ul><li>National Water Policy 2002 – “ Adequate safe drinking water facilities should be provided to the entire population...
<ul><li>Reflection of conflict within the official system on the ground. </li></ul><ul><li>Logic of demand and supply fail...
<ul><li>There is no link between water supply and waste water. Both are treated separately.  </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing on ...
Waste Water - Ground Realities <ul><li>No underground drainage system. Informal colonies discharge waste water into open d...
<ul><li>National Water Policy 2002 has strong view on people’s participation in planning, designing and implementation. </...
<ul><li>Meetings with senior officials - Peri-urban poor  have tried very hard to put forth their demand of formal water s...
<ul><li>Nexus between the maintenance staff and the people of informal colonies. </li></ul><ul><li>Role of elected represe...
<ul><li>- Linking Water supply and waste water. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing interaction between the govt. agencies within...
- Conventional forms of engagement (workshops, policy discussions). - Non-conventional form of engagement -  Multi-Criteri...
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Pritpal Randhawa - Politics of formal water management and sustainability concerns in peri-urban Delhi

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Presentation at the STEPS Conference 2010 - Pathways to Sustainability: Agendas for a new politics of environment, development and social justice

http://www.steps-centre.org/events/stepsconference2010.html

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Pritpal Randhawa - Politics of formal water management and sustainability concerns in peri-urban Delhi

  1. 1. Politics of Formal Water Management and Sustainability Concerns in Peri-urban Delhi STEPS Centre, University of Sussex Conference on “Pathways to Sustainability: Agenda for New Politics of Environment , Development and Social Justice” 23 & 24 September 2010, IDS, University of Sussex, UK
  2. 2. <ul><li>For or against water reforms (public vs private) (Mishra and Goldar 2008; Hall and Lobina 2007; Ranganathan et al 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>Policy driven vs need driven approach (Allen et al 2006). </li></ul><ul><li>For or against formalising private water vendors (Kjellen and Macgranahan 2006; Dardenne 2006; Reut et al 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Waste water reuse and management ( Parkinson and Taylor 2003; Bradford et al 2003 ; Marshall et al 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>For most of these studies problem of peri-urban water is a matter of flawed policy and regulatory practices. </li></ul>Debates on Peri-urban Water
  3. 3. <ul><li>Do not engage deeply with understanding the complex interactions between formal policies, technical interventions, peri-urban action plans. </li></ul><ul><li>Overlook the inter-relationship between formal mechanisms and informal practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not engage with the question of sustainable water management. </li></ul>Gaps in the Existing Studies
  4. 4. <ul><li>Peri-urban water management is an outcome of complex interaction between actors, policies, technical interventions and informal practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Who are the actors that shape the water supply and waste water system in peri-urban interface? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the official framing in relation to water supply, waste water and people’s participation in decision making? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the ground realities in relation to official framing on these issues? </li></ul><ul><li>How is the formal system and informal practices inter-related to each other? </li></ul>Peri-urban Water Management Our Strand
  5. 5. Case Study Area Map of India Ghaziabad Delhi
  6. 6. <ul><li>Constituted of plethora of government agencies at different scales within and beyond water sector –either minimal or negligible interaction between them. </li></ul><ul><li>Guided by policies drafted in accordance to the politics of ruling party in the centre and the state - Translation of policies into action plan is a top-down process </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation of the action plan is done by team of engineers - modus operandi is based on calculations and projections. They overlook the interface of technical solutions with conflicts and contradictions at the ground. </li></ul>Official System and Actors
  7. 7. <ul><li>National Water Policy 2002 – “ Adequate safe drinking water facilities should be provided to the entire population both in urban and in rural areas”. </li></ul><ul><li>At the level of implementation - logic of demand and supply (assessment of present availability and consumption, and projection of future needs). </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict within the action plan and officials in relation to informal settlements (IS) – plan states regularisation of IS, the officials opines it is not their responsibility. </li></ul>Water Supply - Official Framing
  8. 8. <ul><li>Reflection of conflict within the official system on the ground. </li></ul><ul><li>Logic of demand and supply fails. </li></ul><ul><li>Peri-urban dwellers forced to adopt coping mechanism – tapping pipeline going to formal colony, using submersible, buying water from vendors etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Formal system in the form of maintenance staff and elected representative supports informal practices. </li></ul>Water Supply - Ground Realities
  9. 9. <ul><li>There is no link between water supply and waste water. Both are treated separately. </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing on domestic waste water at national scale. At the level of city, the Ghaziabad Master Plan 2021 states 80 percent of Ghaziabad has underground drainage system. </li></ul><ul><li>At national scale there is an agency to deal with industrial waste water(CPCB). At local level the regional pollution control office deals with the issue by monitoring the industrial pollution. </li></ul>Waste Water - Official Framing
  10. 10. Waste Water - Ground Realities <ul><li>No underground drainage system. Informal colonies discharge waste water into open drains. </li></ul><ul><li>The industries do not use ETP installed in premise. No CETP in the region. </li></ul><ul><li>Industries discharge their untreated waste water either in open drains or dump it somewhere in isolation. </li></ul><ul><li>Both domestic and industrial waste water through the network of drains flow into the river Hindon. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>National Water Policy 2002 has strong view on people’s participation in planning, designing and implementation. </li></ul><ul><li>Manifestation of national assertion at local level. </li></ul><ul><li>- Senior officials routine meeting hours. </li></ul><ul><li>- Participatory forums like friends of industries, friends of irrigation etc. </li></ul><ul><li>- Elected representative of Urban Local Body (ULB) </li></ul>People’s Participation Official Framing
  12. 12. <ul><li>Meetings with senior officials - Peri-urban poor have tried very hard to put forth their demand of formal water supply in the offices of several senior officials but nothing happened. </li></ul><ul><li>Official forums - People are unaware of forums such as friends of industries or friends of irrigation etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Elected representative in the ULB – this is the only thing that seems to work but not in a way as it is expected to work. The municipal councilor play the role of negotiator between the formal system and informal practices. </li></ul>People’s Participation Ground Realities
  13. 13. <ul><li>Nexus between the maintenance staff and the people of informal colonies. </li></ul><ul><li>Role of elected representative as a negotiator of informal practices with the formal system. </li></ul><ul><li>The silence of the formal system on informal practices. </li></ul>Link between Formal system and Informal Practices
  14. 14. <ul><li>- Linking Water supply and waste water. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing interaction between the govt. agencies within and beyond water sectors at different scales. </li></ul><ul><li>Linking technical interventions with the processes at the ground. </li></ul><ul><li>Resolving the conflict between the action plan and the implementation. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing the role of ULBs. </li></ul><ul><li>Involving people in co-framing the plan and its implementation. </li></ul>Sustainable Water Management
  15. 15. - Conventional forms of engagement (workshops, policy discussions). - Non-conventional form of engagement - Multi-Criteria mapping (MCM) is an interactive, decision analysis technique that provides a way of appraising a series of different options, or possible ways forward, for a complex issue. It helps individuals to explain their beliefs and views about a complex or controversial issue in a structured and systematic way. Engagement with Actors
  16. 16. Thank You!

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