Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National
Responses to Highly Pathogenic Avian
Influenza                  Sophal Ear, PhD
Table of Contents

 I.   Introduction
 II.  Timeline—
      Moments
 III. Policy Narratives
 IV. Understanding the
      P...
I. Intro: Cambodia’s response to
     global public health crisis
Intro: Global response’s affect on
            Cambodia
Awash in donor money, Cambodia
played its role on a global policy stage
Goal: reduce pandemic potential that
could strike donor countries themselves
A Few Words on Methodology
• Qualitative research methodology
• 40+ one-on-one semi-structured interviews
  across gov’t, ...
II. Timeline—Context
  • Political Structure and Modern History
  • Aid Dependence and Tourism
  • The Livestock Sector an...
Timeline—Moments
• Start: SARS (2002), A Wake-up Call;
  Enter HPAI (2004)
• Middle: HPAI Control Activities; From
  Anima...
Emerging or Reemerging Disease
       Threat Since 1990
Enter Super Moan &
Pandemic Preparedness
Timeline—Moments: Last Act
III. Policy Narratives
• Narrative 1: Cull without Compensation
• Narrative 2: It’s Health Now!
• Narrative 3: What about ...
Cull without Compensation
It’s Health Now!
Poverty and Livelihoods
Actors, Networks, and Interests
 6



 5


 4


 3



 2


 1
Adapted from data originating from Avian Influenza and Pande...
Network diagram on the relationship
between donors and the government
―With respect to Avian Influenza, the Royal Government
of Cambodia has intervened effectively and
appropriately, given res...
―With respect to Avian Influenza, Donors (including all
non-Royal Government of Cambodia entities whether
local or interna...
IV. Understanding the Political
    Economy of the Policy Process
• Donors and NGOs
• Beyond Aid: Other Sources of Revenue...
Cambodia’s AI & Pandemic
                           Preparedness Pie (2008-2009)
                                         ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeL3pM8L8DA
          16 minute video
          Available in two parts on
          YouTube...
V. Conclusion: Key challenges,
      obstacles and opportunities
• Don’t Forget Livelihoods!
  – Government and Donors mot...
Conclusion (cont’d)
• Increase credibility of MAFF as partner by
  building its technical capacity & financial
  managemen...
Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza by Sophal Ear
Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza by Sophal Ear
Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza by Sophal Ear
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza by Sophal Ear

1,323 views

Published on

In February 2009, an expert meeting co-hosted by the STEPS Centre and Chatham House and funded by DFID/the World Bank was held in Hove, Sussex, UK. The meeting reviewed country-level experiences of HPAI response in Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia. This is the presentation from the Cambodia work. Find out more at: http://www.steps-centre.org/ourresearch/avianflu.html

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,323
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza by Sophal Ear

  1. 1. Cambodia’s Victim Zero: Global and National Responses to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Sophal Ear, PhD
  2. 2. Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Timeline— Moments III. Policy Narratives IV. Understanding the Political Economy of the Policy Process V. Conclusion
  3. 3. I. Intro: Cambodia’s response to global public health crisis
  4. 4. Intro: Global response’s affect on Cambodia
  5. 5. Awash in donor money, Cambodia played its role on a global policy stage
  6. 6. Goal: reduce pandemic potential that could strike donor countries themselves
  7. 7. A Few Words on Methodology • Qualitative research methodology • 40+ one-on-one semi-structured interviews across gov’t, private sector, & NGOs • Web survey launched on 27 May 2008 – 44 visits – 17 responses
  8. 8. II. Timeline—Context • Political Structure and Modern History • Aid Dependence and Tourism • The Livestock Sector and Poultry in Particular Human Pandemic Flu Timeline Asian flu H2N2 Russian H1N1 H9N2 H5N1 Spanish (H1N1) HK flu H3N2 HPAI H5N1 H7N2 H7N3 H10N7
  9. 9. Timeline—Moments • Start: SARS (2002), A Wake-up Call; Enter HPAI (2004) • Middle: HPAI Control Activities; From Animal to Human Health
  10. 10. Emerging or Reemerging Disease Threat Since 1990
  11. 11. Enter Super Moan & Pandemic Preparedness
  12. 12. Timeline—Moments: Last Act
  13. 13. III. Policy Narratives • Narrative 1: Cull without Compensation • Narrative 2: It’s Health Now! • Narrative 3: What about Poverty and Livelihoods?
  14. 14. Cull without Compensation
  15. 15. It’s Health Now!
  16. 16. Poverty and Livelihoods
  17. 17. Actors, Networks, and Interests 6 5 4 3 2 1 Adapted from data originating from Avian Influenza and Pandemic Preparedness Funding Matrix Cambodia 2008-2009, see Table 1.5 in Annex 1.
  18. 18. Network diagram on the relationship between donors and the government
  19. 19. ―With respect to Avian Influenza, the Royal Government of Cambodia has intervened effectively and appropriately, given resource allocations.‖ Strongly Strongly Agree Neutral Disagree N/A Agree Disagree (a) Among humans: 6% 50% 25% 6% 0% 13% 1 8 4 1 0 2 (b) Among animals: 7% 47% 40% 0% 0% 7% 1 7 6 0 0 1 (c) Protecting livelihoods: 8% 25% 25% 17% 0% 25% 1 3 3 2 0 3 (d) Pandemic preparation: 13% 47% 13% 13% 0% 13% 2 7 2 2 0 2 (e) Other 17% 0% 0% 0% 0% 83% 1 0 0 0 0 5
  20. 20. ―With respect to Avian Influenza, Donors (including all non-Royal Government of Cambodia entities whether local or international) have intervened effectively and appropriately, given resource allocations.‖ Strongly Strongly Agree Neutral Disagree N/A Agree Disagree (a) Among humans: 18% 59% 12% 0% 0% 12% 3 10 2 0 0 2 (b) Among animals: 7% 60% 33% 0% 0% 0% 1 9 5 0 0 0 (c) Protecting livelihoods: 0% 38% 31% 15% 0% 15% 0 5 4 2 0 2 (d) Pandemic preparation: 7% 36% 29% 7% 0% 21% 1 5 4 1 0 3 (e) Other 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0 0 0 0 0 0
  21. 21. IV. Understanding the Political Economy of the Policy Process • Donors and NGOs • Beyond Aid: Other Sources of Revenue and the Importance of Tourism – Bureaucratic Politics and Patronage • Media Spin
  22. 22. Cambodia’s AI & Pandemic Preparedness Pie (2008-2009) Animal health $2,077,861 , (9%) Human health $8,944,457 , (40%) $5,031,076 , (23%) Information, education, communication (IEC) Pandemic preparedness $6,198,512 , (28%) Source: Avian Influenza and Pandemic Preparedness Funding Matrix Cambodia 2008-2009, see Table 1.5 in Annex 1.
  23. 23. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeL3pM8L8DA 16 minute video Available in two parts on YouTube under the title: Cambodia: THE BIRD FLU quot;PANDEMICquot; HOAX!
  24. 24. V. Conclusion: Key challenges, obstacles and opportunities • Don’t Forget Livelihoods! – Government and Donors motivated by other concerns • Revisiting Compensation – Tremendous confusion about its use and effectiveness elsewhere
  25. 25. Conclusion (cont’d) • Increase credibility of MAFF as partner by building its technical capacity & financial management • Ultimate responsibility for success or failure of policies must rest with those in charge—authorities themselves

×