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Cosmic adventure 5.4 Moving Objects in Visonics

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The visonic version of objects in motion. The approach is different from relativity and the results are also different. But they are all realistic and classical.

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Cosmic adventure 5.4 Moving Objects in Visonics

  1. 1. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com OBJECTS IN MOTION IN VISONICS Cosmic Adventure 5.4
  2. 2. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Two Observers The relativity theory uses more than two observers so that a transformation of the coordinate systems can take place. 0’ P0’’ Systems 0’ Systems 0’’
  3. 3. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com A Single Coordinate System The visonic theory does not involve coordinate system changes because it is a direct study of the effects of light on observed objects. So a single system is employed. It involves only an observer and an object. This object is preferably a clock that can move around in case motion is involved. 0 P
  4. 4. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Observer and Runaway Object To start with, we have two atomic clock perfectly and locally synchronized. One is used by the observer and the other acts as the runaway object. Clock A [Observer] Clock B [Object]
  5. 5. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑥 = 0 𝑡 = 0 𝑠𝑒𝑐 Observer and object are staying at the same spot O to start with at time 𝑡 = 0. Actually, we can start off anywhere, from 𝑠 = 0 to 𝑠 = ∞. Observer Object Starting Point
  6. 6. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Synchronized Clocks Clock A stays with the observer and clock B begins to move away at a velocity of 𝑣 at time 𝑡 = 0. It is expected that both clock keeps on telling time at the same rate wherever even when they are separated. The physical laws are the same for all inertial systems. 𝑣
  7. 7. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Clock Images As clock B move along, it keeps on sending a stream of images back to the observer. What the observer sees is therefore the image of the clock, not the actual clock itself. We select only one or two images for our discussion. 𝑣𝑐 Image carried by light
  8. 8. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 So there are three objects involved. The two clocks are real material bodies; the light image are made up of photons. All these bodies are ‘physically real’. No abstract mathematical bodies are present. 3. Image carried by light 1. Clock A 2. Clock B 𝑐 Real Material body Real material bodyImage composed of photons
  9. 9. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com The distance covered by clock B after a period of ∆𝑡1 is: 𝑠 = 𝑣∆𝑡1. For example, we assume ∆𝑡1to be three seconds. We take this moment of time as the starting point of our investigation. 𝑠 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑣 ❶
  10. 10. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 Clock A At this moment ∆𝑡1, clock B sends an image of clock B to A at velocity 𝑐 while keeps on moving to the right at velocity 𝑣. 𝑠 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 Object Clock B at time = ∆𝑡1 ❷ Image of B carried by light at speed c Clock B carried on moving to the right Clock A remains stationary 𝑐
  11. 11. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B By the time the image reaches A after time 𝑡2, clock B would have moved to C within time 𝑡2. Let’s say it takes light one second to reach A. Both the real clock would have advanced by 𝑡2 as well. 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 ❸ Image ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B 𝑥3 Actual position of B
  12. 12. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 Image of B at B ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Observation 1: Apparent Position of B Since what the observer intercepted is the image of clock B at B, the apparent position of B is: 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 This position is called ‘apparent’ because clock B is already not there. 𝑥3 Apparent position
  13. 13. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 Image of B at B ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Observation 2: Current Time The time taken for the image to reach A is 𝑡2 at speed c. Since it covers the same distant 𝑥1initially taken by the clock: 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 ∆𝑡2 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑐 The clocks A and B has now advanced by a time = ∆𝑡2. The current time ∆𝑡3 is therefore: ∆𝑡3 = ∆𝑡1 + ∆𝑡2 It takes the image time ∆𝑡2to reach A, say 1 second ∆𝑡3 ∆𝑡3
  14. 14. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 Image of B at B ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Observation 3: Apparent Time The observed or apparent time shown on the image of B is that of a time ∆𝑡2 earlier. So the apparent time on the clock image appears to be slower than clock A by ∆𝑡2: ∆𝑡3= ∆𝑡1 + ∆𝑡2 ∆𝑡3> ∆𝑡1 𝑥3 It takes the image time ∆𝑡2to reach A, say 1 second 𝑡3 𝑡3
  15. 15. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 𝑐∆𝑡2 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 ∆𝑡2 = 𝑣∆𝑡1/𝑐 Image of B at B ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Observation 4: Actual Position of B The actual position of B is C when A sees the image: 𝑥3 = 𝑥1 + ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 + 𝑣∆𝑡2 = 𝑣(∆𝑡1 + ∆𝑡2) Now ∆𝑡2 = 𝑣∆𝑡1/c, so: 𝑥3 = 𝑣(∆𝑡1 + 𝑣∆𝑡1/c) = (1 + 𝑣/𝑐)𝑣∆𝑡1 = 1 + 𝑣 𝑐 𝑥1 𝑥3
  16. 16. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 𝑥1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 Image of B at B ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Observation 5: Actual Timing The actual time of clock A and clock B are the same, both registering the current time at 4 seconds: ∆𝑡3 = ∆𝑡1 + ∆𝑡2 ∆𝑡3 ∆𝑡3 ∆𝑡1
  17. 17. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 Image 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Actual time Actual timeApparent time Overall Configuration
  18. 18. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com 𝑣 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 Image ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C 𝑐 Real clock A Real clock B Actual position of B 𝑥3 Apparent position of B Actual time Actual timeApparent time General Measurements
  19. 19. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Summary of Observations The apparent position of B is: 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 The apparent time of B is (Slower than what is now on A & B): ∆𝑡1 The actual position of B is farther than apparent position: 𝑥3 = 1 + 𝑣 𝑐 𝑥1 The actual time of B is the same as A but longer than apparent time: ∆𝑡3 = ∆𝑡1 + ∆𝑡2 = ∆𝑡1 + 𝑣 𝑐 ∆𝑡1 = 1 + 𝑣 𝑐 ∆𝑡1
  20. 20. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com Conclusions The actual position of B is farther away than its apparent position: 𝑥3 = 1 + 𝑣 𝑐 𝑥1 > 𝑥1 The actual time of A & B is longer than apparent time (apparent time is slower): ∆𝑡3 = 1 + 𝑣 𝑐 ∆𝑡1 > ∆𝑡1 A B 𝑥1 = 𝑣∆𝑡1 = 𝑐∆𝑡2 ∆𝑥 = 𝑣∆𝑡2 C Actual position of B 𝑥3 Apparent position of B Actual time ∆𝑡3 Actual time ∆𝑡3Apparent time ∆𝑡1
  21. 21. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com They are all physically real quantities. Even the apparent time and position are made up of real photons of light. They are all physically real quantities. Even the apparent time and position are made up of real photons of light. The equations are derived through classical approaches, so the study of visonics is in essence a branch of classical physics dedicated to the study of light speed. These are the basic equations from visonics. It does not need the Lorentz transformations of coordinates so that no complicated mathematics is involved.
  22. 22. © ABCC Australia 2015 new-physics.com RELATIVISTIC LENGTH CONTRACTION To be continued in Cosmic Adventure 5.5

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