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Board Game Jam OER17

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Be led through the process of creating, licensing, and sharing a board game as an Open Educational Resource (OER) with this award winning hands-on workshop created by Stephanie (Charlie) Farley and Gavin Willshaw of Information Services Group at The University of Edinburgh.

Originally created for the University’s Innovative Learning Week in 2016, Board Game Jam has been re-purposed and presented as a one day, half-day, and one hour(!) workshop.

The workshop guides groups of participants through all the steps to create their own board game. It explores prototyping and play-testing and how to add variety and fun by employing different game mechanics.

In the workshop we encourage groups to create games using digitised images openly licensed from the University of Edinburgh Library; but, of course, images can be sourced from elsewhere on the web.

Our workshop covers:

- the differences between copyright and licensing,
- how to identify licensed material that is free for re-use,
- how to licence your own work.

We share all the resources for running a Board Game Jam as OERs on our http://www.open.ed.ac.uk website. The beauty of which is that you can adapt and modify the format and purpose of a Jam to suit your own needs.

In this session we will run participants through the 60minute variant, working in groups to create your own game inspired by, and using, openly licensed images from the University of Edinburgh’s digitised collection.

We will also discuss how this can be used for a variety of learning and teaching applications, and encourage creative thought on what other types of OER can be incorporated, encouraged, and created through play.

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Board Game Jam OER17

  1. 1. Board Game Jam Board Game Jam – using OER to create OER Playful Engagement Stephanie (Charlie) Farley Open Education Resource Advisor Educational Design and Engagement, LTW Except where otherwise stated, this document has been licensed CC BY 4.0
  2. 2. Aims for today • Consider playful engagement to encourage OER use. • Create OER using OER. • Create your own fully attributable, shareable game. By AIGA [Public domain], via Wikimedia
  3. 3. Open Educational Resources (OER) The University of Edinburgh has an Open Educational Resources Policy, which encourages staff and students to use OERs, and to openly licence their teaching materials as OER. The policy provides guidelines for practice in learning and teaching.
  4. 4. Open Educational Resources (OER) The University of Edinburgh has an Open Educational Resources Policy, which encourages staff and students to use OERs, and to openly licence their teaching materials as OER. The policy provides guidelines for practice in learning and teaching.
  5. 5. Raising the profile The University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Research Collections’ has created a Flickr account to encourage the use of its digital images. It contains several hundred images and is a great example of an institutional Open Educational Resource. https://www.flickr.com/photos/crcedinburgh/albums
  6. 6. Board Games: Not just Monopoly! • A “golden age” of board games (Duffy, The Guardian, 2014) • Increase in sales of 25% + over last four years • Move from specialist suppliers to the mainstream • Rise in games cafes / clubs • Noticeable increase in games which tackle social issues. (see http://www.tiltfactor.org) • Also games in teaching: • Copyright the Card Game • Curate! The digital curation boardgame
  7. 7. What can games do for us? • Allow us to interact with each other in different ways • Create a safe space where losing can be experienced away from fear. • Provides space for experimentation • Can challenge, inspire, and motivate
  8. 8. Today’s challenge: In the space of 1hour create a board game to be shared as an OER • Game Name • Theme and Setting • End / Win conditions • Set of rules / instructions. • Attribution details for resources used
  9. 9. Are you ready to play? Image: Jumanji, via Giphy.com
  10. 10. CRC Flickr account (select 3 images – 5min)
  11. 11. Theme and Setting (5min) Theme – The underlying premise or set of assumptions describe what the players are doing in the game. Setting – This can be the geographic location, time period, and/or imaginative environment where the game is taking place.
  12. 12. End Conditions (5min) What are the end or win conditions for your game? What objective or purpose are your players working towards (or to avoid)?
  13. 13. Mechanics (10min) Select 2 mechanics from the list provided. “These are the procedures and rules of your game...how players can and cannot try to achieve it, and what happens when they try.” Jesse Schell, The Art of Game Design, A Book of Lenses
  14. 14. Gameplay / Rules (15min) Write out a basic set of rules on a spare sheet of paper (NOT on your game document) that will guide your players through your game mechanics towards the end/win condition of your game. Consider what types of resources might you want to include in a game? Digital? Audio? Physical? Where might you source these?
  15. 15. Gameplay / Rules (10min) Confirm your rules and write these down on your game document. Have you listed all of the resources used to create your game? Including any you created yourself?
  16. 16. Congratulations! You made a board game! Image: Robot/Android by OpenClipart-Vectors/23750, Pixabay, CC0
  17. 17. Could games, and/or game creation, be used in your OER teaching? Rock-Craft, by Workandapix (Pixabay), CC0
  18. 18. http://open.ed.ac.uk/run-your-own-board-game-jam/
  19. 19. Feedback and Follow Up http://Open.Ed.ac.uk @OpenEdEdinburgh

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