All material in this presentation, including text and images, is the property of Noel-Levitz, Inc. Permission is required ...
Nearly 40 years; 60+ consultants; 500 years
experience; 2,700 campuses served
Noel-Levitz Partnership Funnel
Then
• Name purchase—The College
Board, ACT, NRCCUA, CBSS
• High school visits
• College fairs
• Group and individual camp...
Now
• Use of statistical multi-variant
analysis in: (predictive modeling)
− Prospecting (student search)
− Inquiry pool qu...
Market segmentation by:
• Populations
• Academic programs
• Academic ability
• Talent areas
• Geographic areas
• Potential...
Landing pages
are easily
duplicated and
customized to
meet specific
market
segment needs
and interests
• Advent of Web sites as
primary source of
information, including
micro-sites
• Growing number of social
media outlets
− F...
How many students cite the following resources as influential?
• More students using
mobile devices not
just to explore your
Web site but to
complete forms and
engage with your
faculty ...
How many students are interested in using the following resources?
• Greater orientation to
ongoing market research
− Demographic trends
− Student satisfaction
− Brand/Image research
− Pric...
Measuring Advertising
Performance
Measuring Advertising
Performance
Measuring Advertising
Performance
37%
Measuring Advertising
Performance
37% 42%
Measuring Advertising
Performance
37% 42% 21%
Measuring Advertising
Performance
Testing Customer
Conversion Behaviors
Testing Customer
Conversion Behaviors
?
Testing Customer
Conversion Behaviors
• A more
cohesive, integrated
approach to
enrollment
management –
removing silos
(admissions, marketin
g, recruiting, rete...
• Introduction of net
price calculator to
help students and
families qualify
affordability and to
help influence college
i...
• Greater attention to
continuity, stability, and
professional development
in the enrollment office
• Aggressive efforts t...
Institutions are
facing never-ending
expectations
• Most colleges are as interested in
―shaping‖ the student body as
meeting FTE or headcount goals
(academically, geographi...
• Is there a consensus on enrollment
goals?
• Are enrollment goals and challenges well-
understood campuswide?
• Are resou...
1. Not doing the right things
(fundamentals)
2. Not doing things right (implementation)
3. Not having the necessary resour...
Demographic and economic change
Institutions need to
analyze the demographic
and economic changes
projected to take place ...
Key question
What are the
enrollment
management
challenges and
opportunities at your
institution?
Increasing enrollment?
U...
Reconsidering college plans
47 percent of
students reported
that the economic
crisis has caused
them to
reconsider their
c...
• Students will likely apply to more schools as they ―shop‖
for the best deal.
• Because of the increase in applications, ...
• Operating in an increasingly competitive
environment
• Located in a highly competitive state and
area– many other colleg...
• Fewer students with the ability to pay
for the ever rising costs of higher
education
• Strong scholarship programs to ―w...
Projected change in numbers of new high
school graduates 2011-12 to 2021-22
© Copyright 2011, The Chronicle of Higher Educ...
Number of colleges and
universities, 2012-13
© Copyright 2012, The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Reprinted with permissio...
† In-state institutions receiving the
largest number of in-state freshmen.
†† Competition factor equals college
continuati...
• Are they defined and understood by the
board, staff, faculty, alumni, and friends?
• Are they categorized by short-term
...
Larger/Smaller institutions
Public/Private institutions
Four-year/Two-year institutions
Higher-cost/Lower-cost institution...
• Students and parents know it is a
―buyer’s market‖– college shopping is
pervasive
• The search for the right college or
...
• How satisfied are your students with
the quality of their educational
experience?
• What is your graduation rate?
• What...
Top 10 most effective practices – 2011
student recruitment practices and strategies
Rank Four-year Public Four-year Privat...
Top 10 most effective practices – 2011
student retention practices and strategies
Rank Four-year Public Four-year Private ...
Top-ranked practices in student
retention across sectors
• Academic support programs and
services
• Programs targeted to f...
Making retention a campuswide
responsibility – faculty and staff are the key
The evolution of enrollment management
• Admissions stage (―order taking‖)
• Recruiting stage (proactively seeking student...
A simple definition of
enrollment management
Institutionwide
Systematic
Comprehensive
Research-
driven
Enrollment management systems
• Market research
• Marketing
• Advertising
• Direct mail
• Recruitment
• Admissions
• Finan...
By understanding and addressing:
• The marketplace in which the college
operates
• The institutional position within that
...
• Your position and perception in the marketplace
• Pricing issues and the price sensitivity of students
and families
• Ap...
• Developing longer-term plans
• Identifying and eliminating barriers to
enrollment
• Knowing the profile of the persister...
For additional information on these and
other topics, go to noellevitz.com
Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success
Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success
Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success
Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success
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Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success

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Noel-Levitz session on contemporary thinking around enrollment opportunities and challenges

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  • The following panels demonstrate examples of segmented paid interactive marketing campaigns and landing pages for just a few of the clients we serve.
  • Many seeking geographical diversity Many seeking to improve academic profile of entering class, or want to attract students who are a “good fit” Virtually all want to improve retention rate Many challenged to increase net revenue/decrease discount rate All want to be more efficient (spend less money) and effective Institutions are attempting to determine ‘the new normal” and reset accordingly
  • Many seeking geographical diversity Many seeking to improve academic profile of entering class, or want to attract students who are a “good fit” Virtually all want to improve retention rate Many challenged to increase net revenue/decrease discount rate All want to be more efficient (spend less money) and effective Institutions are attempting to determine ‘the new normal” and reset accordingly
  • Many seeking geographical diversity Many seeking to improve academic profile of entering class, or want to attract students who are a “good fit” Virtually all want to improve retention rate Many challenged to increase net revenue/decrease discount rate All want to be more efficient (spend less money) and effective Institutions are attempting to determine ‘the new normal” and reset accordingly
  • Overall discount rate = Unfunded gift aid / gross revenue (including room and board)
  • DefinitionsSmall College, Low Tuition (SCLT): Colleges with a tuition and mandatory fee rate of less than $25,000 andenrollment of less than 850 full-time, first-year students.Small College, High Tuition (SCHT): Colleges with a tuition and mandatory fee rate of more than or equal to$25,000 and enrollment of less than 850 full-time, first-year students.Large College or University (LCU): Colleges or universities that enroll more than 850 full-time, first-year students.
  • Note: Figures include state tax appropriations, other state money, and federal stimulus money. They do not include appropriations for capital outlays and debt service, nor do they include appropriations from local governments. Figures for New York include only state support for the City University of New York. North Dakota, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming enact stated appropriations every two years. Different budgeting practices among the states make it impossible to ensure that all figures are perfectly comparable. The data were collected from September 2011 to mid-January 2012 and may be subject to change.
  • Missouri ACT Identified Keys to Enrollment Success

    1. 1. All material in this presentation, including text and images, is the property of Noel-Levitz, Inc. Permission is required to reproduce information. Identified Keys to Enrollment Success: A Review of Best Practices in Attracting and Retaining Students Presented by Stephanie Geyer Vice President for Web Strategy and Interactive Marketing Services March 27, 2013
    2. 2. Nearly 40 years; 60+ consultants; 500 years experience; 2,700 campuses served
    3. 3. Noel-Levitz Partnership Funnel
    4. 4. Then • Name purchase—The College Board, ACT, NRCCUA, CBSS • High school visits • College fairs • Group and individual campus visits— open house events • Mass mailings of printed pieces • Off-campus interviews • Telemarketing/Counseling • Qualifying and grading of inquiries • High school counselor liaison • Tele-qualifying The ever-changing world of enrollment management Life was simpler then. “ ”
    5. 5. Now • Use of statistical multi-variant analysis in: (predictive modeling) − Prospecting (student search) − Inquiry pool qualification − Applicant/Admit stage − Student persistence/retention • Recruitment – data-based management − Tracking effectiveness of all strategies and tactics The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    6. 6. Market segmentation by: • Populations • Academic programs • Academic ability • Talent areas • Geographic areas • Potential new sources of revenue − Online − Continuing education The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    7. 7. Landing pages are easily duplicated and customized to meet specific market segment needs and interests
    8. 8. • Advent of Web sites as primary source of information, including micro-sites • Growing number of social media outlets − Facebook − Twitter − LinkedIn − Google+ − YouTube − Vine − Instagram The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    9. 9. How many students cite the following resources as influential?
    10. 10. • More students using mobile devices not just to explore your Web site but to complete forms and engage with your faculty and staff • Skype, Google Hangouts and Webinars provide new ―remote‖ face-to- face connections. The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    11. 11. How many students are interested in using the following resources?
    12. 12. • Greater orientation to ongoing market research − Demographic trends − Student satisfaction − Brand/Image research − Price sensitivity − Program demand − Lost inquiries and applicants − Delivery format preferences − Perception − Non-matriculant studies − Competitor analysis The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    13. 13. Measuring Advertising Performance
    14. 14. Measuring Advertising Performance
    15. 15. Measuring Advertising Performance
    16. 16. 37% Measuring Advertising Performance
    17. 17. 37% 42% Measuring Advertising Performance
    18. 18. 37% 42% 21% Measuring Advertising Performance
    19. 19. Testing Customer Conversion Behaviors
    20. 20. Testing Customer Conversion Behaviors ?
    21. 21. Testing Customer Conversion Behaviors
    22. 22. • A more cohesive, integrated approach to enrollment management – removing silos (admissions, marketin g, recruiting, retention , financial aid, orientation) The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    23. 23. • Introduction of net price calculator to help students and families qualify affordability and to help influence college interest and choice • Greater orientation to longer-term strategic enrollment planning – ―No room for error‖ The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    24. 24. • Greater attention to continuity, stability, and professional development in the enrollment office • Aggressive efforts to mobilize the campus community in recruitment and retention • Recognition of importance and value of comprehensive goal- driven retention plans and programs The ever-changing world of enrollment management
    25. 25. Institutions are facing never-ending expectations
    26. 26. • Most colleges are as interested in ―shaping‖ the student body as meeting FTE or headcount goals (academically, geographically, by major, diversity) • Enrollment goals are not well understood campuswide • Resources available to accomplish goals are limited • Staff turnover in enrollment services is prevalent • Adequate research and data to make informed decisions is lacking The enrollment expectation bar continues to be raised each year
    27. 27. • Is there a consensus on enrollment goals? • Are enrollment goals and challenges well- understood campuswide? • Are resources available to accomplish goals? • Are staff professionally trained and stable to respond to the increased challenges? • Is institutional data and research available to make informed enrollment decisions? Organizing for the “new normal”
    28. 28. 1. Not doing the right things (fundamentals) 2. Not doing things right (implementation) 3. Not having the necessary resources 4. Product is inadequate 5. Product is adequate—not positioned properly or negative image 6. Environmental factors— demographics, economy, price sensitivity, etc. Six reasons for not maximizing enrollment potential
    29. 29. Demographic and economic change Institutions need to analyze the demographic and economic changes projected to take place in their marketplace. • High school grads • Non-traditional students • Ethnicity • Program demand • Price sensitivity • Competition
    30. 30. Key question What are the enrollment management challenges and opportunities at your institution? Increasing enrollment? Under-enrolled programs? Retention? Diversity? Staff development? Geographical representation? Attracting better-qualified students? Improving operations efficiency/effectiveness? Program demand? Awareness, image, and perception?
    31. 31. Reconsidering college plans 47 percent of students reported that the economic crisis has caused them to reconsider their college plans • Avoiding private school options—26% • Commuting instead of living on campus—25% • Working while going to school—25% • Attending a community or technical college—19% • Vo-tech instead of traditional—4% • Part-time attendance instead of full-time—1% • Not attending college at all—1%
    32. 32. • Students will likely apply to more schools as they ―shop‖ for the best deal. • Because of the increase in applications, plan on declines in completion rates and yield. • Campuses may need to prepare (and budget) for decreases in fall 2014 enrollments • Students may seek lower cost options like community colleges and regional public institutions • Campuses will need to step up marketing efforts to sell value • Families will seek more aid like never before • More adults seeking college courses and/or degrees What assumptions should we make
    33. 33. • Operating in an increasingly competitive environment • Located in a highly competitive state and area– many other college options • Far more aggressive marketing and recruiting by both public and private institutions – two year and four year • More sophisticated market place…plans, systems, and advanced tools being developed • The addition in recent years of multiple ―for profit‖ institutions as well as online and distance education options Among the challenges facing colleges and universities
    34. 34. • Fewer students with the ability to pay for the ever rising costs of higher education • Strong scholarship programs to ―woo‖ students are even more prevalent • Students and parents are far more results-oriented in their selection of a college–want to know outcomes and benefits • Changing demographic Among the challenges facing colleges and universities
    35. 35. Projected change in numbers of new high school graduates 2011-12 to 2021-22 © Copyright 2011, The Chronicle of Higher Education. Reprinted with permission. This material may not be posted, published, or distributed without permission from The Chronicle.
    36. 36. Number of colleges and universities, 2012-13 © Copyright 2012, The Chronicle of Higher Education. Reprinted with permission. This material may not be posted, published, or distributed without permission from The Chronicle.
    37. 37. † In-state institutions receiving the largest number of in-state freshmen. †† Competition factor equals college continuation rate less number of students migrating and the three in- state institutions receiving the largest number of in-state freshmen. Missouri: The competition factor 64,456 high school seniors / 2013-14* 154 institutions of higher education** 61.4% college continuation rate (39,576)*** (ranks 31st among states) 17.3% leave the state to go to college (6,830)**** (ranks 27th among Three Largest Institutions†***** Number of In-state Freshmen***** University of Missouri – Columbia 4,063 Saint Louis Community College 3,023 Metropolitan Community College – Kansas City 2,445 Sources: *Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Knocking at the College Door, 2012 **The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2013 ***Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Chance for College by Age 19 by State 1986-2010, 2013 ****Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Interstate Migration of College Freshmen 1986-2010, 2012 *****National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (2012) 23,215 students ÷ 151 institutions = 154 students per institution††
    38. 38. • Are they defined and understood by the board, staff, faculty, alumni, and friends? • Are they categorized by short-term (1-3 years)? • Are they categorized by long-term (3-5 years)? • Is there a plan of action to address each challenge? • Is there an understanding and appreciation of the net revenue implications of any demographic and, therefore, enrollment changes? What are your enrollment challenges?
    39. 39. Larger/Smaller institutions Public/Private institutions Four-year/Two-year institutions Higher-cost/Lower-cost institutions Know with whom you compete in order to position your institution A non-matriculant survey on an annual basis is one of the most important things you can do.
    40. 40. • Students and parents know it is a ―buyer’s market‖– college shopping is pervasive • The search for the right college or university is starting earlier – junior year of high school, or even sophomore year (market research shows for some institutions that 70% are in a database by the end of the sophomore year) • Students expect to be courted – and not just high ability, but those who are average academically • Dealing with ―snowplow parents‖ (formerly ―helicopters‖) Dealing with a more sophisticated and demanding consumer
    41. 41. • How satisfied are your students with the quality of their educational experience? • What is your graduation rate? • What are my chances of getting a degree, diploma, or certificate in a timely way? • How qualified and student centered are your faculty? • Does your financial aid keep pace with price increases? • How supportive is the learning environment? What are the tough questions you are receiving? Have you thought through your responses as a team?
    42. 42. Top 10 most effective practices – 2011 student recruitment practices and strategies Rank Four-year Public Four-year Private Two-year Public 1. Campus visit days for high school students Hosting open house events Admissions decisions ―on the spot‖ in high schools or during campus visits/open houses 2. Hosting open house events Campus visit days for high school students High school visits by admissions representatives to primary markets 3. Using enrolled students in recruitment/marketing Encouraging prospective students to apply on the admissions Web site Campus visit days for high school students 4. Encouraging prospective students to apply on the admissions Web site Using enrolled students in recruitment/marketing Using enrolled students in recruitment/marketing 5. Community college articulation agreements Using a statistical, analytical approach to determine financial awards Campus visit days designed for school counselors 6. Weekend visits for high school students Routine contacts by admissions office professional staff to assess student reactions to financial aid awards Offering loans directly from the college or university 7. Encouraging prospective students to schedule campus visits on the admissions Web site Weekend visits for high school students Hosting open house events 8. Using a statistical, analytical approach to determine financial awards Routine contacts by financial aid office professional staff to assess student reactions to financial aid awards Academic programs within high schools for students to earn college credits to your institution 9. Campus visit days designed for school counselors Telecounseling Encouraging prospective students to apply on the admissions Web site 10. Admissions decisions ―on the spot‖ in high schools or during campus visits/open houses High school visits by admissions representatives to primary markets College-sponsored trips to campus for prospective students
    43. 43. Top 10 most effective practices – 2011 student retention practices and strategies Rank Four-year Public Four-year Private Two-year Public 1. Honors programs for academically advanced students Programs designed specifically for first- year students Institutionwide emphasis on the teaching of undergraduates and undergraduate learning 2. Academic support program or services Giving students practical work experiences in their intended major to apply their learning Academic support program or services 3. Programs designed specifically for first- year students Academic support program or services Programs designed specifically for first- year students 4. Programs designed specifically for conditionally admitted students Institutionwide emphasis on the teaching of undergraduates and undergraduate learning Providing each continuing student a written academic plan/roadmap of remaining courses needed 5. Programs designed specifically for at-risk students Mandatory advising, one-on-one and face- to-face, between faculty and students Title III or Title V funding 6. Using a CRM (custom relationship management system) software application to help track and manage student retention Early-alert intervention system Using Web-based course engagement tools such as Blackboard, WebCT, etc. 7. Giving students practical work experiences in their intended major to apply their learning Programs designed specifically for at-risk students Honors programs for academically advanced students 8. Mandatory advising, one-on-one and face- to-face, between faculty and students Honors programs for academically advanced students Academic advising program 9. Title III or Title V funding Collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs to minimize attrition Mandatory advising, one-on-one and face- to-face, between faculty and students 10. Learning communities Using on-campus student employment as a strategy to engage/retain students Using student life evaluations to make changes to student life programs and services
    44. 44. Top-ranked practices in student retention across sectors • Academic support programs and services • Programs targeted to first-year students • Mandatory advising, one-on-one and face-to-face • Honors programs for advanced students Best Practices in Retention © 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc. 2011 Retention Practices at Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions
    45. 45. Making retention a campuswide responsibility – faculty and staff are the key
    46. 46. The evolution of enrollment management • Admissions stage (―order taking‖) • Recruiting stage (proactively seeking students) • Marketing stage (increase promotion) • Enrollment management (an integrated and comprehensive process) • Strategic enrollment and revenue planning A student body by design rather than chance
    47. 47. A simple definition of enrollment management Institutionwide Systematic Comprehensive Research- driven
    48. 48. Enrollment management systems • Market research • Marketing • Advertising • Direct mail • Recruitment • Admissions • Financial aid • Billing • Orientation • Registration • Advising • Academic support services • Atmospherics • Residence life • Student life • Instruction • Placement • Alumni relations
    49. 49. By understanding and addressing: • The marketplace in which the college operates • The institutional position within that marketplace • Student demand for programs and services and being responsive to those needs and interests • Developing a cohesive and well-coordinated approach to enrollment management within the framework of a comprehensive annual and strategic enrollment plan How can your institution meet immediate and long-term enrollment objectives?
    50. 50. • Your position and perception in the marketplace • Pricing issues and the price sensitivity of students and families • Appropriate and effective student financial aid policies and procedures • The real cost of student populations; putting a price tag on the wish list: − Multicultural students − Selected majors − Geographical diversity in-district and out-of-district − Student retention issues and opportunities Strategic thinking and planning is key
    51. 51. • Developing longer-term plans • Identifying and eliminating barriers to enrollment • Knowing the profile of the persister • Cultivating current students • Reminding current students and parents that they made a good decision • Identifying and responding to the marketplace • Conducting meaningful market research • Mobilizing the campus to assist with recruitment and retention Colleges and universities are finding ways to become more strategic, efficient, and effective
    52. 52. For additional information on these and other topics, go to noellevitz.com

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