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Friend or foe? Lessons learned from human-to-human interaction: Human centered design with social perception in mind. (UX Camp Europe 2019)

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rough, first “beta” version of this talk- it's unpolished & there might be typos.

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Friend or foe? Lessons learned from human-to-human interaction: Human centered design with social perception in mind. (UX Camp Europe 2019)

  1. 1. Friend or foe? Lessons learned from human-to-human interaction: Human centered design with social perception in mind. UX Camp Europe 2019 #uxce19 Stefanie Kegel // @guerillagirl_ or @thegeekettez
  2. 2. The Geekettez. Experience Design Studio Mannheim/Berlin Psychology Interaction Designer Ladies that UX Berlin (2016) Music ( <3 SoMa FM) Horror, Midnight Movies and Trash Cinema <3 Texas, NY, California Lecturer Interaction Design (CODE University)
  3. 3. P.S.: I hate computers.
  4. 4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_rage Computer rage » In 2007, a German man threw his computer out the window in the middle of the night, startling his neighbors. German police were sympathetic and did not press charges, stating „Who hasn't felt like doing that?“ «
  5. 5. Fogg, B. J. Persuasive Technology : Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do. Amsterdam; Boston :Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 2003 Computer rage
  6. 6. Computer rage
  7. 7. B= f(P,E) = Behavior as a function of the Person and their environment Kurt Lewin’s Equation Lewin, Kurt: Principles of Topological Psychology (1936)
  8. 8. As designers, our job is actually to design an *environment*
  9. 9. *INTERFACE*
  10. 10. „A point where two systems, subjects, organizations, etc. meet and interact“ *INTERFACE*
  11. 11. Interface? Image Source: Museumsstiftung Post und Telekommunikation
  12. 12. Interface?
  13. 13. Social presence lead to social situations and responses Social situation: A situation in which a person's cognitions, emotions, motives and actions are influenced by the actual, suspected (or sometimes merely imagined) presence of someone else.
  14. 14. ….like e.g avoiding to become a premium customer. Social presence lead to social situations and responses
  15. 15. What cues did people receive by this behavior? Maybe something similar to this? > Unhelpful behavior. Computer Says No = #CarolBeerUX
  16. 16. „Wut -User“ Negative situations can lead to negative social responses
  17. 17. In Human to human interaction we use those social and often subtle cues to make inferences/leaps of logic about this persons traits & character, even we don’t know them. Human service agent, employee: Are they friendly? Helpful? Rude? Arrogant? —> derived from subtle social cues We fill in the blanks.
  18. 18. Ok, but computing technology is not alive!? – Also inanimate things can convey social presence through social cues.
  19. 19. Inanimate things can coney social presence through social cues Physical cues
  20. 20. Physical cues Spoken language Inanimate things can coney social presence through social cues
  21. 21. Physical cues Spoken language Written language Inanimate things can coney social presence through social cues
  22. 22. Inanimate things can coney social presence through social cues
  23. 23. Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation: SYSTEM We fill in the blanks. We make leaps of logic and are attributing „personality traits“ from the appearance and behavior which comes from a non-human system. ORGANISATION/ COMPANY INTERFACE as social actor: Is it friendly? Helpful? Rude? Arrogant? —> derived from subtle social cues Responsible for the behavior of this system
  24. 24. 1.What are the intentions of other people toward me? (WARMTH) 2.How capable are they of carrying out those intentions (COMPETENCE) Fiske, Cuddy, Glick, Xu (2002). A Model of (often mixed) stereotype content: Competence and warmth respectively follow from perceived status and competition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2002, Vol. 82, No. 6, 878 –902 Social cues help us to form an impression of other people. And when people get to know other people, they have a primary interest in two types of information: Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation:
  25. 25. These judgments are of evolutionary necessity and they are made a) very fast and b) automatically. You wanted to know if a stranger is well intentioned or ill intentioned toward you because that might have been a matter of survival. Our lizard brain is still there.
  26. 26. Fiske, S. T., Cuddy, A. J. C., Glick, P., & Xu, J. (2002). A model of (often mixed) stereotype content: Competence and warmth respectively follow from perceived status and competition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(6), 878-902. Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation: Competence Warmth Pride & Admiration We feel attracted, tendency to alliance and support Sympathy but also pity Tendency to help, and showing eventually patronizing and paternalistic behavior We feel disgusted, tendency to dehumanize people. Tendency to avoid & reject them Envy & Jealousy Tendency to sabotage and mistrust High HighLow Low
  27. 27. Source: https://www.thecut.com/2015/05/simpsons-first-impression-matrix.html Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation:
  28. 28. Example: The hidden delete account function Warmth might scale low, but competence high: Meaning they have the power to carry out their intentions by sending you through a never ending maze so you can't achieve your goal which was to delete your account. Unconscious inference: They might have bad intentions toward me, they might be selfish. Might lead to mistrust. Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation:
  29. 29. Sloppy use of text - eg by using bad automatic translations, lack of understanding (in voice-based UIs) or buggy functions. Warmth might scale high (depending on how other things work) Competence might scale low. Unconscious inference: Pity, can’t take the software seriously, eventually mistrust. Absolutely critical when this happens to „serious“ services like banks or airlines. Social cues ➝ Social perception = Impression formation:
  30. 30. All the interactions which we might have with organizations or companies via their products, websites, apps, phone, customer service, social media, etc - send us social cues via the behavior of their products and how they communicate – and we fill in the blanks and form an impression.
  31. 31. • Where for example would we find the voice-based assistant Siri (or Alexa) on the warmth/competence model? And what does this mean to our perception towards women? • Where would we find (voice-based) technology in general on the model? And what does that mean toward our perception and trust in technology in general? Outlook:
  32. 32. „One cannot not communicate“ – Paul Watzlawick
  33. 33. Thank you! Stefanie Kegel // @guerillagirl_ or @thegeekettez stefanie@thegeekettez.com

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