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Your Networked World: Connections, Self-Presentation and Privacy in the Age of Social Media

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This is a general presentation about social connections on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. It discusses unique qualities of these sites while sharing research and ideas regarding ways that users can increase their privacy and enhance their online self-presentation.

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Your Networked World: Connections, Self-Presentation and Privacy in the Age of Social Media

  1. 1. YOUR NETWORKED WORLD Stefanie Duguay, MSc. Oxford Internet Institute (Alum) Created Nov. 18, 2013 Connections, SelfPresentation, and Privacy in the Age of Social Media
  2. 2. WHY USE SOCIAL MEDIA?  It proliferates the number of weak social ties in your network  This increases your ‘social capital’ – your ability to access:  Novel information  Resources Photo courtesy of Arindam "mak" Ghosh
  3. 3. CONNECTING ON SOCIAL MEDIA  Connections are formed and fortified through:  Self-presentation (e.g. profiles, status updates)  Publicly displayed relationships with others (e.g. wall posts, tagging in photos)
  4. 4. WHO ARE YOUR CONNECTIONS?  On sites like Facebook, your connections can be comprised of a wide array of family, friends, and acquaintances  This is very dif ferent from in-person settings with a fixed audience  Many people are not even aware of all their connections – try NameGenWeb https://apps.facebook.co m/namegenweb
  5. 5. SOCIAL NETWORKING CHALLENGES  Dif ficulty with privacy settings  Personal information that you may not share with all your contacts  Leads to context collapse Photo courtesy of Martin Cathrae
  6. 6. CHANGING PERCEPTIONS OF PRIVACY  A shift from protecting personal information to ‘controlling who knows what about you’ – privacy in context  Extremely dif ficult in environments with reduced contexts  But people still manage, how? Image courtesy of g4ll4is
  7. 7. TARGETED MESSAGES  People frequently post messages that only some of their connections will understand or notice  Academics call this ‘social steganography’ – hiding social messages in plain sight  It works because:  Language is symbolic  Sometimes people do mind their own business – “civil inattention” Photo courtesy of Jim Bauer
  8. 8. REBUILDING CONTEXT  Facebook’s popularity is decreasing because users are starting to spread out their connections on dif ferent social media sites  People are being more selective about who they add as connections  Facebook ≠Twitter ≠ Tumblr ≠ Instagram  Grouping connections using site features (e.g. Lists on Facebook) is getting easier Photo courtesy of Martin Pettitt
  9. 9. WHAT DOES IT MEAN?  You can apply this knowledge to your own social networking by:  Getting a better idea of what your networks look like  Making sure that you are comfortable with the overarching self-presentation displayed by your profile and online interactions  Giving privacy settings a shot, especially lists  Knowing your audience for certain posts and tailoring your messages to them  Using different social media sites for different purposes or social groups
  10. 10. RELATED RESEARCH & REFERENCES  S o c ia l N e t wor k i n g S i te s a n d S o c i a l C a p i t a l E l l i s o n , N . B . , S t e i n f i e l d , C . , & L a m p e , C . ( 2 0 07 ) . T h e b e n e f i t s o f F a c e b o o k “ f r i e n d s ” : S o c i a l c a p i t a l and college students’ use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Comunication , 1 2 (4), 1143-1168. Vitak , J., & Ellison, N.B. (2012). ‘There’s a network out there you might as well tap’: Exploring the benefits of and barrier s to exc hanging informational and suppor t -based resourc es on Fac ebook . N e w M e d i a & S o c i e t y, 1 5 ( 2 ) , 2 4 3 - 2 5 9 .  P r i va c y L i v i n g s t o n e , S . ( 2 0 0 8 ) . Ta k i n g r i s k y o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n y o u t h f u l c o n t e n t c r e a t i o n : Te e n a g e r s ’ u s e o f s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e s f o r i n t i m a c y, p r i v a c y a n d s e l f - e x p r e s s i o n . N e w M e d i a & S o c i e t y, 1 0 ( 3 ) , 3 9 3 - 41 1 . N i s s e n b a u m , H . ( 2 0 0 9 ) . P r i v a c y i n c o n t e x t : Te c h n o l o g y, p o l i c y, a n d t h e i n t e g r i t y o f s o c i a l l i f e . Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.  C o n tex t C o l l a p s e & R e ac t i o n s boyd, d. (2011). Social network sites as networked publics: Af fordances, dynamics, and i m p l i c a t i o n s . I n Z . P a p a c h a r i s s i , A N e t w o r ke d S e l f : I d e n t i t y, C o m m u n i t y, a n d C u l t u r e o n S o c i a l N e t w o r k S i t e s ( p p . 3 9 - 5 8 ) . N e w Yo r k : R o u t l e d g e . boyd, d., & Mar wick , A . (2011). Social steganography: Privacy in networked publics. International Communication Association , (Boston, MA). Retrieved from h t t p : / / w w w . d a n a h . o r g / p a p e r s / 2 01 1 / S t e g a n o g r a p h y - I C AVe r s i o n . p d f Hogan, B. (2010). The presentation of the self in the age of social media: Distinguishing p e r f o r m a n c e s a n d e x h i b i t i o n s o n l i n e . B u l l e t i n o f S c i e n c e , Te c h n o l o g y & S o c i e t y, 3 0 ( 6 ) , 3 7 7 - 3 8 6 . M a r w i c k , A . E . , & b o y d , d . ( 2 0 1 1 ) . I t w e e t h o n e s t l y, I t w e e t p a s s i o n a t e l y : Tw i t t e r u s e r s , c o n t e x t c o l l a p s e , a n d t h e i m a g i n e d a u d i e n c e . N e w M e d i a & S o c i e t y, 1 3 ( 1 ) , 1 1 4 - 1 3 3
  11. 11. QUESTIONS? THANK YOU! stefanieduguay.com @DugStef Note: The views expressed in this presentation are my own and are based on my research and the research referenced. My views do not reflect the views of my employer.

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