Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

What is relative income poverty?

1,822 views

Published on

This can be thought of as absolute e.g. the number of people living on less than £1 or $1 a day (or less than what is needed for a minimum standard of living)

Published in: Data & Analytics
  • I like this service ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐ from Academic Writers. I don't have enough time write it by myself.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • taking surveys for cash online? =>> https://t.cn/A6ybKmr1
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • There is a REAL system that is helping thousands of people, just like you, earn REAL money right from the comfort of their own homes. The entire system is made up with PROVEN ways for regular people just like you to get started making money online... the RIGHT way... the REAL way. ♣♣♣ http://t.cn/AisJWzdm
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • As a single mother every little bit counts! This has been such a great way for me to earn extra money. As a single mother every little bit counts! Finally, a vehicle for making some honest to goodness real money to make life easier and happier now that I don't have to pull my hair out budgeting every penny every day.Thanks for the rainbow in my sky. ●●● https://bit.ly/2Ruzr8s
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

What is relative income poverty?

  1. 1. What is relative income poverty?
  2. 2. Poverty • This can be thought of as absolute e.g. the number of people living on less than £1 or $1 a day (or less than what is needed for a minimum standard of living) • Or as relative – e.g. a person can be in relative poverty if their situation is a certain amount below the average
  3. 3. Relative Income Poverty • In developed countries the main measure of poverty is relative income poverty. • We measure the number of people who are living in a household where the household income is less than 60% of the median household income in the UK. • This is an internationally recognised way of measuring poverty.
  4. 4. What does this mean?
  5. 5. Imagine a simplified world: • There are 100 households each with 1 person • There is £10,000 to be earned each week £10,000100 people
  6. 6. • If everyone earned the same there would be 100 people each earning £100 per week £10,000 = £100 per person, per week 100
  7. 7. So what would the median be? • The median income is the middle income, in other words, if we wrote out all the incomes from smallest to largest, the median would be the one in the middle. £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ £ Median incomeLowest income Highest income
  8. 8. • So in this all equal world, the median weekly income = £100 because this is what everyone earns. • 60% of the median income = 60% of £100 = £60 • The number of people earning less than £60 per week is zero • No one is living in relative income poverty because everyone earns the same amount.
  9. 9. Income distribution in this hypothetical, all-equal world Weekly income bands Number of people 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Under £10 £10 to £20 £21 to £30 £31 to £40 £41 to £50 £51 to £60 £61 to £70 £71 to £80 £81 to £90 £91 to £100 £101 to £110 £111 to £120 £121 to £130 £131 to £140 £141 to £150 Relative income poverty line No one is in relative income poverty Everyone is earning the same so there is only one bar 60% of the median income = £60
  10. 10. Imagine a slightly different spread of income in our simplified world: • There are still 100 households each with 1 person • There is still £10,000 to be earned each week £10,000100 people In reality, people earn different amounts- does this mean there will always be people in relative income poverty?
  11. 11. However, this time: 30 people earn £80 per week 40 people earn £100 per week 30 people earn £120 per week The median income is still £100 (see how the median is calculated at the end of this presentation) So 60% of the median income is still £60 Nobody is earning below £60 a week – so even though people earn different amounts there are still no people living in relative income poverty.
  12. 12. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Under £10 £10 to £20 £21 to £30 £31 to £40 £41 to £50 £51 to £60 £61 to £70 £71 to £80 £81 to £90 £91 to £100 £101 to £110 £111 to £120 £121 to £130 £131 to £140 £141 to £150 Income distribution in this hypothetical world Weekly income bands Number of people No one is in relative income poverty Relative income poverty line 60% of the median income = £60
  13. 13. We are still in our simplified world: • There are still 100 households each with 1 person • There is still £10,000 to be earned each week £10,000100 people What if the difference in incomes is larger?
  14. 14. However, this time: • 3 people earn £30 per week • 7 people earn £50 per week • 20 earn £80 • 40 earn £100 • 30 earn £130 The median income is still £100 (as 30 people earn below £100 and 30 people earn above £100) So 60% of the median income is still £60. But now, because of the way income is distributed, there are 10 people living in relative income poverty.
  15. 15. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Under £10 £10 to £20 £21 to £30 £31 to £40 £41 to £50 £51 to £60 £61 to £70 £71 to £80 £81 to £90 £91 to £100 £101 to £110 £111 to £120 £121 to £130 £131 to £140 £141 to £150 Income distribution in this hypothetical world Weekly income bands Number of people These people are in relative income poverty Relative income poverty line 60% of the median income = £60
  16. 16. Conclusion 1. Relative income poverty is a measure of income inequality - It does not measure whether or not incomes meet what is needed for a basic standard of living. 2. If household incomes are very similar, the rate of relative income poverty will be low, it could even be zero. This is because it measures how close incomes are to the average (as given by the median). Let’s look at the actual income distribution in the UK . . .
  17. 17. Distribution of UK household income, 2016/17 (before housing costs have been paid) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 60% of median = £296 per week Number of individuals (millions) Equivalised net household income (on a per week basis) Notes: 1. Equivalisation is a statistical process that allows comparisons to be made of individuals of different ages from different sized households. 2. There are another 5.7 million individuals not shown on this chart because they have a household income above £1,000 per week 3. There is a higher bar at zero due to a mix of factors. These include those who are self-employed reporting a loss whose income is set to zero if it is negative and those temporarily without an income at the point of interview. It may also include households who have misreported their income. Everyone below this threshold is in relative income poverty – this is around 10.4 million people or 16% of the UK population. Relative income poverty line Median income = £494 per week
  18. 18. Finally, what happens to relative income poverty if the average income falls? • 3 people earn £30 per week • 7 people earn £50 per week • 20 earn £80 • 40 earn £100 • 30 earn £130 • Median income = £100 • 60% of median = £60 • There are 10 people in relative income poverty (the 7 people earning £50 a week and the 3 people earning £30 a week). • 3 people earn £30 per week • 7 people earn £50 per week • 20 earn £80 • 40 earn £83 • 30 earn £130 • Median income = £83 • 60% of median = £49.8 • Now there are only 3 people in relative income poverty (the 3 people earning £30 a week) Scenario 1 Scenario 2 Imagine the average income falls but all else remains the same: The percentage of people in relative income poverty falls, but no one is better off in terms of living standards – in fact those on average incomes are worse off. This situation can happen during a recession. This is why it is important to consider other measures of poverty alongside relative income poverty . . .
  19. 19. Would you like more information? The Department for Work and Pensions publish analysis of the UK income distribution and other measures of poverty such as absolute income poverty, material deprivation and persistent poverty. They also publish this helpful infographic. Poverty statistics for Wales can be viewed on the Welsh Government website. This page includes relative income poverty rates broken down by various characteristics. It also includes other measures of poverty such as material deprivation and persistent poverty. If you would like more information or have any feedback, please email: stats.inclusion@gov.wales
  20. 20. Calculating the median of 100 values The median is the middle value when all the values are written in order 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 <THIS IS THE MIDDLE> 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 There is no single income in the middle because there 100 values. To get the median we take the 50th and the 51st value, add them together and divide by 2. In this case the 50th and 51st value both = £100 £100 + £100 = £200. £200 divided by 2 = £100 Back

×