HOW WE REACT TO DISASTERS
Rainier Valley Rotary Club
Seattle, Washington
Tuesday, December 17, 2013
THE DISASTER LIFECYCLE
BE INFORMED

TAKE ACTION

MAKE A PLAN

ACT RESPONSIBLY

BUILD A KIT

SAVE LIVES OF PEOPLE & PETS

G...
BOHOL EARTHQUAKE
IMPACT OF THE CRISIS
544K homes damaged or
destroyed
344K displaced
195 dead, 651, injured & 12
missing

...
SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN (YOLANDA)
IMPACT OF THE CRISIS
14.12M affected

6,105 dead & 1,779 missing
4M displaced, w/o food,
H2...
Photo Courtesy of John Javellana
PRIORITY NEEDS & ACTIONS

Water,
Sanitation
&
Hygiene

Food

Debris Removal

&

&

Nutrition

Coordination

Shelter,

Ment...
Photo Courtesy of John Javellana
HOW WE TRADITIONALLY GIVE
Most people give immediately after a crisis, in
response to clear emotional appeals. Yet donors
...
HOW YOU CAN HELP
Private dollars can help with disaster relief throughout
the disaster life cycle. Suggestions for investo...
WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA?
Operation Pay It Forward
Collaborate with Partners

Adopt a Community

Sponsor a Project

Facilitate ...
CASH FOR WORK
PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION

Photo by Andre Aragon
PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION

Photo by Andre Aragon
Stacy C. Noland
Executive Director, Moontown Foundation
stacy@moontownfoundaton.org
www.moontownfoundation.org
(425) 830-4...
{INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK}
Charcoal for $$
Seattle Vulnerability Index
Seattle Hazard Identification
Vulnerability Analysis (SHIVA)
1. Earthquakes

10. Disease Outbreaks

2. Snow, Ice and Extre...
1000 people died, AFTER
the hurricane hit
Photo Courtesy of John Javellana
Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters
Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters
Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters
Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters
Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters

2,602 views

Published on

Most people give immediately after a crisis, in response to clear emotional appeals. Yet donors who allocate funds across the disaster life cycle have an opportunity to help ensure that each dollar given reaches its full potential. This presentation discusses how individuals and organizations traditionally give during a crisis, and proposes several innovative approaches to promoting short- and long-term solutions to help communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,602
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,796
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Rethinking the Way We Respond to Disasters

  1. 1. HOW WE REACT TO DISASTERS Rainier Valley Rotary Club Seattle, Washington Tuesday, December 17, 2013
  2. 2. THE DISASTER LIFECYCLE BE INFORMED TAKE ACTION MAKE A PLAN ACT RESPONSIBLY BUILD A KIT SAVE LIVES OF PEOPLE & PETS GET INVOLVED Prepare Respond PREVENT FUTURE EMERGENCIES Mitigate Recover PROTECT PROPERTY ASSESS DAMAGE HAZARD & RISK ANALYSIS COORDINATE & REMOVE DEBRIS STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT PROMOTE PUBLIC & COMMUNITY WORKS DISASTER PROOF BUILDINGS & INFRASTRUCTURE EDUCATE, TRAIN & ENGAGE PUBLIC Much of what will happen in an emergency or a disaster can be predicted. This knowledge allows individuals and communities to anticipate the types of disasters that are likely to affect them, and to think of ways to reduce the impact, or prevent disasters altogether.
  3. 3. BOHOL EARTHQUAKE IMPACT OF THE CRISIS 544K homes damaged or destroyed 344K displaced 195 dead, 651, injured & 12 missing Landslides caused by the earthquake damaged critical infrastructure and utilities, hospitals, schools, and housing. $46.8M in next 6-mos. Source: United Nations OCHA Situation Report No. 23, Monday, December 13, 2013 On October 15, 2013, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake occurred in Bohol, an island province located the Central Philippines. According to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), it was the deadliest earthquake in the Philippines in 23 years. The energy of the quake released was equivalent to 32 Hiroshima bombs.
  4. 4. SUPER TYPHOON HAIYAN (YOLANDA) IMPACT OF THE CRISIS 14.12M affected 6,105 dead & 1,779 missing 4M displaced, w/o food, H2O & shelter $791M next 12-mos. Source: United Nations OCHA Situation Report No. 23, Monday, December 13, 2013 Typhoon Haiyan, known as Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, is the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record, and is also the strongest storm recorded at landfall, reaching maximum sustained winds of 195 mph.
  5. 5. Photo Courtesy of John Javellana
  6. 6. PRIORITY NEEDS & ACTIONS Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Food Debris Removal & & Nutrition Coordination Shelter, Mental Health Settlements & & Medical Non Food Items Services From initial onset of disaster through the first 12-months Communication & Logistics
  7. 7. Photo Courtesy of John Javellana
  8. 8. HOW WE TRADITIONALLY GIVE Most people give immediately after a crisis, in response to clear emotional appeals. Yet donors who allocate funds across the disaster life cycle have an opportunity to help ensure that each dollar given reaches its full potential.
  9. 9. HOW YOU CAN HELP Private dollars can help with disaster relief throughout the disaster life cycle. Suggestions for investors include: 1. Incorporate the entire disaster life cycle in funding efforts. 2. Fund efforts to “build back better.” 3. Facilitate conversations between key partners. 4. Invest in programs that promote education & training. 5. Support inclusive planning efforts and innovative solutions. Source: Center For Disaster Philanthropy
  10. 10. WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? Operation Pay It Forward Collaborate with Partners Adopt a Community Sponsor a Project Facilitate Cash For Work Accelerate Economic Development
  11. 11. CASH FOR WORK
  12. 12. PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION Photo by Andre Aragon
  13. 13. PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION Photo by Andre Aragon
  14. 14. Stacy C. Noland Executive Director, Moontown Foundation stacy@moontownfoundaton.org www.moontownfoundation.org (425) 830-4083
  15. 15. {INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK}
  16. 16. Charcoal for $$
  17. 17. Seattle Vulnerability Index
  18. 18. Seattle Hazard Identification Vulnerability Analysis (SHIVA) 1. Earthquakes 10. Disease Outbreaks 2. Snow, Ice and Extreme Cold 11. Water Shortages 3. Windstorms 12. Excessive Heat Events 4. Terrorism 13. Civil Disorder 5. Transportation Accidents 14. Landslides 6. Power Outages 15. Tsunamis 7. Fires 16. Active Shooter Incidents 8. Infrastructure Failures 17. Hazardous Materials 9. Flooding 18. Volcano Hazards Based on frequency and consequences, Seattle has ranked its hazards by level of concern. These events can result in damage to property, death and injury, impacts to natural systems, economic and social hardship, and interruption of utility and transportation services.
  19. 19. 1000 people died, AFTER the hurricane hit
  20. 20. Photo Courtesy of John Javellana

×