Chapter 11 Standard Costs and Variance Analysis
Presentation Outline <ul><li>Types of Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Variance Calculations </li></ul><ul><li>Investigation of...
I. Types of Standards <ul><li>Ideal Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Can only be attained under the best circumstances.  No all...
II. Variance Calculations <ul><li>Material Price Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Material Price Variance Journal Entry </li></u...
A. Material Price Variance MPV = (AP – SP) AQ where: MPV = Material price variance AQ = Actual quantity of materials purch...
B. Material Price Variance Journal Entry (Recorded at Time of Purchase) Raw Materials (AQ x SP)  XXX Materials Price Varia...
C. Material Quantity Variance MQV = (AQ – SQ) SP where: MQV = Material quantity variance SP = Standard unit price of mater...
D. Material Quantity Variance Journal Entry (Recorded when materials are put into production) Work in Process (SQ x SP)  X...
E. Labor Rate Variance LRV = (AR – SR) AH where: LRV = Labor rate variance AH = Actual labor hours worked AR = Actual labo...
F. Labor Efficiency Variance LEV = (AH – SH) SR where: LEV = Labor efficiency variance SR = Standard labor rate AH = Actua...
G. Journal Entry for Direct Labor Variances Work in Process (SH x SR)  XXX Labor Rate Variance [(AR-SR)AH]  XXX  or  XXX L...
H. Controllable Overhead Variance Flexible budget level of overhead for the actual level of production Decision Rule: Actu...
I. Overhead Volume Variance Overhead applied to production using standard overhead rate Decision Rule: Flexible budget > O...
III. Investigation of Standard Cost Variances <ul><li>Management by Exception </li></ul><ul><li>“Favorable” Variances May ...
A. Management by Exception <ul><li>Most managers take a “management by exception” approach and investigate only those vari...
B. “Favorable” Variances May be Unfavorable <ul><li>The fact that a variance is favorable does not mean that it should not...
C. Process Improvements and Unfavorable Variances <ul><li>Production workers suggest a change in the manufacturing process...
D. Variance Evaluation and Excess Production <ul><li>The Theory of Constraints tells us that production departments in fro...
E. Variance Analysis and Performance Evaluation <ul><li>Responsibility accounting states that managers should only be held...
Summary <ul><li>Ideal vs. Attainable Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Material Variances </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Variances </li...
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Jzanzig acc 512 chapter 11

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Jzanzig acc 512 chapter 11

  1. 1. Chapter 11 Standard Costs and Variance Analysis
  2. 2. Presentation Outline <ul><li>Types of Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Variance Calculations </li></ul><ul><li>Investigation of Standard Cost Variances </li></ul>
  3. 3. I. Types of Standards <ul><li>Ideal Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Can only be attained under the best circumstances. No allowance for machine breakdowns or work interruptions </li></ul><ul><li>Attainable Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Tight but attainable standards. Allows for machine downtime and employee rest periods. </li></ul>
  4. 4. II. Variance Calculations <ul><li>Material Price Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Material Price Variance Journal Entry </li></ul><ul><li>Material Quantity Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Material Quantity Variance Journal Entry </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Rate Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Efficiency Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Journal Entry for Direct Labor Variances </li></ul><ul><li>Controllable Overhead Variance </li></ul><ul><li>Overhead Volume Variance </li></ul>
  5. 5. A. Material Price Variance MPV = (AP – SP) AQ where: MPV = Material price variance AQ = Actual quantity of materials purchased AP = Actual unit price of materials SP = Standard unit price of materials Decision Rule: AP > SP Unfavorable AP < SP Favorable
  6. 6. B. Material Price Variance Journal Entry (Recorded at Time of Purchase) Raw Materials (AQ x SP) XXX Materials Price Variance [(AP-SP)AQ] XXX or XXX Accounts Payable (AQ x AP) XXX
  7. 7. C. Material Quantity Variance MQV = (AQ – SQ) SP where: MQV = Material quantity variance SP = Standard unit price of materials AQ = Actual quantity of materials put into production SQ = Standard quantity allowed for the output produced Decision Rule: AQ > SQ Unfavorable AQ < SQ Favorable
  8. 8. D. Material Quantity Variance Journal Entry (Recorded when materials are put into production) Work in Process (SQ x SP) XXX Materials Quantity Variance [(AQ-SQ)SP] XXX or XXX Raw Materials (AQ x SP) XXX
  9. 9. E. Labor Rate Variance LRV = (AR – SR) AH where: LRV = Labor rate variance AH = Actual labor hours worked AR = Actual labor rate SR = Standard labor rate Decision Rule: AR > SR Unfavorable AR < SR Favorable
  10. 10. F. Labor Efficiency Variance LEV = (AH – SH) SR where: LEV = Labor efficiency variance SR = Standard labor rate AH = Actual labor hours worked SH = Standard hours allowed for the output produced Decision Rule: AH > SH Unfavorable AH < SH Favorable
  11. 11. G. Journal Entry for Direct Labor Variances Work in Process (SH x SR) XXX Labor Rate Variance [(AR-SR)AH] XXX or XXX Labor Efficiency Variance [(AH-SH)SR] XXX or XXX Wages Payable (AH x AR) XXX
  12. 12. H. Controllable Overhead Variance Flexible budget level of overhead for the actual level of production Decision Rule: Actual > Flexible budget Unfavorable Actual < Flexible budget Favorable Actual overhead Controllable overhead variance = -
  13. 13. I. Overhead Volume Variance Overhead applied to production using standard overhead rate Decision Rule: Flexible budget > O/H applied Unfavorable Flexible budget < O/H applied Favorable Flexible budget level of overhead for actual level of production Overhead volume variance = -
  14. 14. III. Investigation of Standard Cost Variances <ul><li>Management by Exception </li></ul><ul><li>“Favorable” Variances May be Unfavorable </li></ul><ul><li>Process Improvements and “Unfavorable Variances </li></ul><ul><li>Variance Evaluation and Excess Production </li></ul><ul><li>Variance Analysis and Performance Evaluation </li></ul>
  15. 15. A. Management by Exception <ul><li>Most managers take a “management by exception” approach and investigate only those variances that they deem to be exceptional. </li></ul><ul><li>The absolute dollar value of the variance or the variance as a percent of actual or standard cost is often used as the criterion. </li></ul>
  16. 16. B. “Favorable” Variances May be Unfavorable <ul><li>The fact that a variance is favorable does not mean that it should not be investigated. Indeed, a favorable variance may be indicative of poor management decisions. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>A favorable material price variance may be arisen from purchasing goods of inadequate quality for production. </li></ul><ul><li>A favorable overhead volume variance could mean that excessive inventory has been produced beyond customer demand. </li></ul>
  17. 17. C. Process Improvements and Unfavorable Variances <ul><li>Production workers suggest a change in the manufacturing process so that the standard for labor time per unit is reduced from 4 to 3 hours. If the company does not need to increase production and keeps the same number of workers, an unfavorable labor efficiency variance will arise. </li></ul><ul><li>(See Illustration on page 397) </li></ul>
  18. 18. D. Variance Evaluation and Excess Production <ul><li>The Theory of Constraints tells us that production departments in front of bottleneck departments should not produce excess work-in-process inventory. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation in terms of standard cost variances could result in this dysfunctional behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, rather than lay off workers, a department with a temporary demand slump may produce excess units simply to avoid an unfavorable labor efficiency variance. </li></ul>
  19. 19. E. Variance Analysis and Performance Evaluation <ul><li>Responsibility accounting states that managers should only be held accountable for variance that they can control. </li></ul><ul><li>Unfavorable variances do not imply poor performance. For example, an unfavorable labor efficiency variance could result from the purchase of inferior goods (which by the way resulted in a favorable material price variance). </li></ul>
  20. 20. Summary <ul><li>Ideal vs. Attainable Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Material Variances </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Variances </li></ul><ul><li>Overhead Variances </li></ul>

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