Holes & Goals:
An analysis of how to mend my grammatical woes
To Who(or is it whom)ever it may concern
Essential Questions:
How does each part of a sentence work together to create mea...
Enduring Understandings
Each piece of a sentence is deliberate, and related to all the other parts of the sentence.
Each g...
Goals
SWBAT recognize each part of speech and type of sentence structure.
SWBAT identify the rules of punctuation (namely:...
Product 1: A Series of Haikus(15 Parts of Speech/Parts of a Sentence Haikus)
Indefinite Pronouns:
 Act generally
They func...
Product 2: A Journey in Sentence Combining(Several Exercises from a book, combining kernels on one and two levels)
Her bri...
Product 3: Diagramming Sentences
They           lowered             lifeboat   
                                quickly   ...
Product 4: Don’t Go Their: Rules NOT to live by
Prepositions are parts of speech that you shouldn’t end a sentence with.
S...
My Favorite Resources
Sentence Combining Book:
Strong, William.  (1973).  Sentence combining: A composing book.  New York:...
Reflections/Questions
Further implications for teaching?
If I made it this far without needing to be taught these rules ex...
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Holes & goals powerpoint

  1. 1. Holes & Goals: An analysis of how to mend my grammatical woes
  2. 2. To Who(or is it whom)ever it may concern Essential Questions: How does each part of a sentence work together to create meaning? Why are the purposes of each grammatical element important? How do readers and writers benefit from being able to analyze the rules of grammatical structure?
  3. 3. Enduring Understandings Each piece of a sentence is deliberate, and related to all the other parts of the sentence. Each grammatical structure has a specific purpose and place in sentences in order for the sentence to make sense. By learning the grammatical structures, readers and writers can expand their knowledge basis and writing skills.
  4. 4. Goals SWBAT recognize each part of speech and type of sentence structure. SWBAT identify the rules of punctuation (namely: commas, semicolons, dashes, and hyphens). SWBAT diagram sentences correctly.
  5. 5. Product 1: A Series of Haikus(15 Parts of Speech/Parts of a Sentence Haikus) Indefinite Pronouns:  Act generally They function themselves as nouns Somebody loves you Dependent Clauses: Connect to a clause Doesn’t make sense by itself Because she left Rome
  6. 6. Product 2: A Journey in Sentence Combining(Several Exercises from a book, combining kernels on one and two levels) Her bridesmaids lead the procession. Her bridesmaids rustle down the aisle. The bridesmaids’ dresses are pastels. The pastels are green. The pastels are yellow. The bridesmaids carry daisies. The daisies are fresh. The daisies smell like sunlight. Rustling down the aisle in their pastel green and yellow dresses, the bridesmaids lead the procession carrying fresh daisies that smell like sunlight.
  7. 7. Product 3: Diagramming Sentences They lowered lifeboat quickly the last Hiker was hurt badly The quite
  8. 8. Product 4: Don’t Go Their: Rules NOT to live by Prepositions are parts of speech that you shouldn’t end a sentence with. Set off non-essential clauses like the one here with commas. Double negatives aren’t not bad things to use. While writing a paper, sentences should not have dangling modifiers. Use commas, in the right, place. Only use semicolons; to connect two complete clauses. Because you shouldn’t use sentence fragments. Sentences is having subject-verb agreement. Use the correct form of who/whom when you are writing sentences for who it counts that you are correct. Adverbs should have correct endings when used comparative. Dashes—should only be used for a dramatic pause. The writing of a passive voice sentence shouldn’t be done by you.
  9. 9. My Favorite Resources Sentence Combining Book: Strong, William. (1973). Sentence combining: A composing book. New York: Random House. Grammar Book: O’Connor, Patricia T. (1996). Woe is I. New York: Riverhead Books. …and of course– School House Rock!
  10. 10. Reflections/Questions Further implications for teaching? If I made it this far without needing to be taught these rules explicitly, what does this say for our students? What is actually necessary for students to know? For me, I know I will use sentence combining and teach the basics, but sentence diagramming? Exact rules of everything Basic Debate: explicit versus implicit teaching of grammar

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