Teenage Sons And Their Dads Version 1 A

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A research study of Gen Y teenage boys and Baby Boomer Dads. Exploring the differences but more interestingly, the similarities

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Teenage Sons And Their Dads Version 1 A

  1. 1. Teenage Dad’s and Teenage Son’sColmar Brunton’s inside look into generational differences and similaritiesDecember 2010<br />
  2. 2. Background<br />Online survey among n=150 Baby Boomer Dad’s of teenage son’s and n=150 Gen Y teenage son’s using Colmar Brunton’s Fly Buy’s Panel and the CByouth Facebook panel <br />Survey was carried out during 22 Oct – 21 Nov 2010<br />
  3. 3. Quick Fire Q’s<br />
  4. 4. The biscuit debate is easy, but there is a slight shift amongst the young males towards the round ball game!<br />Prefer…<br />Rather win…<br />28%<br />72%<br />19%<br />81%<br />Tim Tams<br />Afghans<br />Rugby World Cup<br />Soccer World Cup<br />77%<br />73%<br />23%<br />27%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  5. 5. Stuck in a lift with….<br />Have round for dinner...<br />Again the males show similarities regardless of age and being stuck in a lift with Nicky Watson beats Helen Clark. Paul Henry shows more youth appeal however…….. <br />19%<br />81%<br />74%<br />26%<br />vs.<br />19%<br />81%<br />Nikki Watson<br />Helen Clark<br />Wouldn’t it be cool if…<br />41%<br />59%<br />vs.<br />John Key<br />Paul Henry<br />Public transport was cheap & reliable in my lifetime<br />Commercial space travel happened in my lifetime<br />35%<br />73%<br />27%<br />65%<br />vs.<br />vs.<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  6. 6. Who is seen to be a role model and why<br />
  7. 7. Richie McCaw provides both generations something to hook into, however it’s the older generation looking at Sam Morgan and the younger generation looking at Peter Jackson that’s interesting<br />“Who is the best role model for young men in NZ today?” <br />Best role model for young men in NZ today...<br />26%<br />26%<br />26%<br />13%<br />13%<br />13%<br />10%<br />7%<br />7%<br />6%<br />6%<br />6%<br />5%<br />4%<br />4%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  8. 8. “Why? What makes Richie McCaw a role model?”<br />Men and boys both look at hard work, authenticity and honest presentation as values they expect from their idols<br />Determined, always gives a 100%, team player, loyal, has self belief, real New Zealander and a leader. <br />Richie McCaw is so down to earth and hasn’t let fame ruin his personality. He gives people his time and is a great role model for NZ rugby here and overseas. <br />Honest, trustworthy, hard working, dedicated, polite, approachable etc<br />He is the All Blacks captain and the whole world looks up to him. Every rugby player in NZ wants to be just like him. He plays fair too. He does heaps of work outside of rugby for lots of groups and everyone likes him. <br />Good leader. Speaks well. Has very good reputation (not known for wild parties - drinking smoking, etc) <br />Heartland NZ fellow makes it to the all blacks, and captains the all blacks and during a winning run. Speaks well and seems to be community mined still. <br />Strives for his goals and as a public figure holds himself high and acts how other people should. Is involved and invokes national pride. <br />He leads a team. He has developed and grown over the years and is a story of potential and motivation leading to success. <br />Always focussed on the task at hand. Don’t blame other people for failure. Enjoy success when it comes his way. Not afraid to work hard to achieve success. <br />Sensible, sets a good example on and off the field. Gracious in defeat and modest when winning. <br />He is someone to look up to on and off the field, does well in the community and in business and is the best captain the all blacks have ever had. <br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  9. 9. There are no ‘superstars’ here or celebrities of the moment – kiwi blokes seem to choose by credibility and history rather than profile <br />Dan Carter<br />John Key<br />Sam Morgan<br />Peter Jackson<br />A great man yet down to earth. Shows genuine care for the disadvantaged in society. Didn’t leave NZ as planned after the Christchurch Earthquake. <br />Sporting, successful, appears to be doing well. Women like him <br />Came from humble beginningsand is now one of the best in the world following his passion <br />Kiwi 'can-do' attitude plus creativity. Professionalism. World-class entrepreneur. <br />A talentedyoung gentleman who likes to strive and achieve his goals through both hard work and in a humble manner <br />Self-made man, not overly pretentious. Respected around the world. <br />He didn’t have an easy childhood, yet rose above his circumstances to become one of the most successful contemporary New Zealanders. <br />Scott Dixon<br />He has worked hard from a young age to get where he is and is now settled, married with children and is giving back to the community that helped him. He is humble while still confident of his abilities, not out spoken but still says what he means. <br />Steve Price<br />Benji Marshall<br />Stan Walker<br />Young Maori gentleman who has started from the bottom and made a success of his life and career. <br />Someone who has good morals. Reliable, and sets boundaries within his life. A good guy <br />An underdog who is doing well and upholds good family values <br />Dedicated, patriotic, determined, skilful, has learnt from his mistakes, leadership, speaks articulately, has family values, team player. <br />Gordon Tietchens<br />Because he is so successful. Gives so much back to the community. <br />He is a hard worker, dedicated to his job and to achieving the best possible results he can <br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  10. 10. PippaWetzell is seen to be the most desirable kiwi woman among fathers of teenage boys; while teenage sons rate Rachel Hunter as no. 1 <br />Who do you think is the most desirable kiwi woman? <br />28%<br />19%<br />19%<br />16%<br />15%<br />13%<br />11%<br />10%<br />9%<br />9%<br />7%<br />7%<br />5%<br />5%<br />2%<br />2%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  11. 11. Sir Ed gets mentioned in terms of being promoted to the $10 – distinct lack of opinion from our Gen Y’s whereas the Dads will lean towards ol’Pinetree<br />“Who is the best role model for young men in NZ today?” <br />If they redesigned the $10 note in 5 years time and they wanted to replace Kate Shepard with a bloke, who would be worthy...<br />9%<br />7%<br />6%<br />5%<br />5%<br />5%<br />5%<br />5%<br />5%<br />5%<br />2%<br />3%<br />4%<br />2%<br />2%<br />2%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />2%<br />2%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />2%<br />0%<br />0%<br />0%<br />0%<br />Other – 31% <br />Don’t Know/ None - 22%<br />Other – 37% <br />Don’t Know/ None - 21%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  12. 12. If they redesigned the $10 note in 5 years time and they wanted to replace Kate Shepard with a bloke, who would be worthy and why...<br />Sir Peter Blake<br />Sir Peter Jackson<br />Sir Colin Meads<br />Sir Edmund Hillary<br />For his outstanding contribution to sailing but also his extensive charity work including the inspiration he provides to the young. <br />His efforts in the NZ film industry have done a lot for our economy and helped put NZ on the map in regards to how the world views us <br />Cause he’s a good, hard, tough, but fair kiwi bloke, he took no shit and was always abloody good leader. <br />He was a true champion, humble and a giving spirit <br />John Kirwan<br />Richie McCaw<br />Willie Apiata VC<br />Billy T James<br /> Greatest ever All Black winger and had the guts to bring metal health issues into the public arena <br /> An iconic NZ Sportsman of our time <br />For military achievement<br />IconicNew Zealander <br />John Key<br />Dan Carter<br />Paul Henry<br />Peter Leitch<br />For building significant international relations as Prime Minister as well as running the country through tough economic times. <br />Because he is awesome and speaks his mind <br />Because everybody you ask on the street will be proud of him and being the same nationality as him. <br />His generosity and common sense and no nonsense attitude <br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  13. 13. Relationship with Media Consumption<br />
  14. 14. The shift in media doesn’t seem to come from Gen Y males tuning out of TV, it seems to be more about ‘media multi tasking’ – TV, internet, mobile aren’t necessarily competing – they are just part of the mix<br />Dad’s are moderate TV watchers<br />Sons claim to be watching TV marginally less often<br />Teenage sons are spending considerably more ‘play’ time<br />And around a quarter of Gen Y <br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  15. 15. Favourite TV Programme – Humour dominates the sphere of male viewing with a sprinkling of competition based reality for Dad’s and train wreck reality for the Gen Y boys<br />6%<br />14%<br />6%<br />5%<br />5%<br />8%<br />6%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  16. 16. First website visited (after email/work stuff) – If one thing can be used to define the difference between the generations it would be their internet usage – for Dad’s its update me, for Gen Y males its about connecting me.<br />19%<br />57%<br />16%<br />13%<br />8%<br />8%<br />5%<br />5%<br />4%<br />3%<br />3%<br />2%<br />3%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  17. 17. Males are driving the handset market with circa 50% carrying 3G phones – content is key, esp to Gen Y with over a ¼ of them spending 11 hours+ “playing”<br />2%<br />1%<br />4G<br />4G<br />53%<br />46%<br />3G<br />3G<br />19%<br />18%<br />2G<br />2G<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  18. 18. Favourite ad…<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />6<br />7%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />3%<br />11%<br />5%<br />5%<br />4%<br />3%<br />3%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  19. 19. A look into our blokes consumer brain<br />
  20. 20. Top 10 things our guys want for Christmas…no.1 is cash – Not so hard to buy for, regardless of age. Dad even wants socks again, but a sleep in would be much more appreciated!<br />$<br />$<br />$<br />$<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  21. 21. “What’s statement best describes your attitude to doing the grocery shopping?”<br />2 in 5 dads claim to always do the supermarket shopping I think it’s ok – Time to re-think the regular household shopper is a female, guys are involved, very involved! <br />I always do it and its OK<br />I always do it and hate it<br />I sometimes go and its OK<br />I sometimes go and hate it<br />I never go supermarket shopping<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  22. 22. Online, farmers markets – none of these new fads or trends have reached our males. Going to the supermarket is part of the weekly schedule and the baby boomers are loyal<br />“How is your grocery shopping done?”<br />61%<br />76%<br />21%<br />15%<br />1%<br />1%<br />1%<br />3%<br />4%<br />3%<br />13%<br />2%<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  23. 23. Impulsive vs. considered approach consumerism does not differ by generation – Around a third are impulsive to a degree whereas the majority remain firmly stuck in reality <br />“‘Thinking about the price of something you really want, a new toy, clothes, gadget etc”<br />If I want it, I just buy it, price is secondary to ‘want’<br />11<br />23<br />39<br />19<br />7<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />I may need to justify it a bit and price can be a hurdle, but not a barrier<br />12<br />22<br />39<br />23<br />4<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />%<br />It’s a balancing act, price can sometimes beat the ‘want’ factor<br />More often than not, the cost of what I want means I don’t get it<br />Can’t remember the last time I bought something I really wanted<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  24. 24. Being a kiwi icon is not the sole property of any one product or item – to be kiwi in the eyes of males is an eclectic mix of many things from Buzzy bees to Jandals to beating the Aussies.<br />People sometimes talk about ‘iconic’ New Zealand items (“Kiwiana”). These are things which are felt to be quite unique to New Zealand and New Zealand life. Which of the following do you think are the best example of kiwiana?<br />NZ All Blacks<br />Edmonds Cookery Book<br />Jandals<br />Beating the Aussies<br />Tiki<br />Hokey Pokey Icecream<br />No.8 Wire<br />Pavlova<br />Hangi<br />Buzzy Bees<br />
  25. 25. Whereas the story for brands is clearer – L&P, Air NZ and Trademe unite the generations as being seen as proud kiwi brands. The difference is more about function (bank and beer for Dad’s) and nostalgia for Gen Y (Pineapple Lumps and Tip Top) <br />Q.<br />What brand or product would you be proud to say is ‘A real New Zealand product / brand’?<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />1<br />1<br />24%<br />14%<br />11%<br />19%<br />15%<br />12%<br />5<br />4<br />7%<br />7%<br />9%<br />9%<br />11%<br />
  26. 26. What issues are concerning our blokes?<br />
  27. 27. Practical, real issues such as drink driving, increased costs of living, broadband, beer are the same for both generations whereas time becomes more of a valuable commodity the older we get and what the opposite sex think is more of a concern for Gen Y ! <br />1<br />1<br />Drink Driving<br />Increased Cost of Living<br />2<br />2<br />3<br />6<br />Time Spent with Family<br />Price of Broadband<br />4<br />3<br />Price of Beer in a Bar<br />5<br />5<br />Impact of Global Warming<br />6<br />7<br />What Women Think of You<br />7<br />4<br />
  28. 28. Drink Driving<br />1<br />1<br />70%<br />59%<br />Concerned<br />13%<br />8%<br />Not concerned<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  29. 29. Increased Cost of Living<br />2<br />2<br />45%<br />67%<br />Concerned<br />21%<br />6%<br />Not concerned<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  30. 30. 3<br />6<br />29%<br />61%<br />Concerned<br />23%<br />9%<br />Not concerned<br />Time Spent with Family<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  31. 31. 4<br />3<br />45%<br />45%<br />Concerned<br />25%<br />15%<br />Not concerned<br />Price of Broadband<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  32. 32. Price of Beer in a Bar<br />5<br />5<br />33%<br />27%<br />Concerned<br />43%<br />51%<br />Not concerned<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  33. 33. 6<br />7<br />25%<br />25%<br />Concerned<br />45%<br />37%<br />Not concerned<br />Impact of Global Warming on NZ<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  34. 34. 7<br />4<br />40%<br />13%<br />Concerned<br />22%<br />53%<br />Not concerned<br />What Women Think of You<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  35. 35. How happy are our blokes with different aspects that shape their lives?<br />
  36. 36. Dads are most happy with their relationship with their son, wife and their career ; while Son’s are equally as happy with their relationship with dad but most happy with their health<br />1<br />2<br />7<br />6<br />2<br />7<br />6<br />3<br />3<br />4<br />5<br />1<br />5<br />4<br />
  37. 37. Generally teenage son’s has a slightly more positive outlook on life compared to our dad’s<br />The relationship with your son/dad<br />The relationship with your wife or partner/gf situation<br />What you’ve achieved in your career/career plan<br />Your health<br />Your job/education<br />Time I get to spend with mates<br />How fit you are<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  38. 38. Relationship with your dad<br />
  39. 39. You’re a better Dad than your Dad was?<br />You think you’ll be a better Dad than your Dad is?<br />Probably the most revealing in terms of the changing face of kiwi bloke-dom. Baby Boomers Dads are aware they are more open than their fathers and today Gen Y boys seem to recognise and respect their Dad’s for it<br />Potentially yes<br />Not really<br />No opinion<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  40. 40. Both dads and sons tend to agree that today’s generation have little respect for their elders. Sons have a greater perception that career defines you as a man<br />What you do for a living / career defines you as a man?<br />Today’s generation have little respect for their elders?<br />Today’s generation are smarter than their elders?<br />Disagree<br />Agree<br />Disagree<br />Agree<br />Disagree<br />Agree<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  41. 41. Both Dads and sons tend to agree that life is more complicated for today’s generation; however feelings are mixed on perceptions of life being harder<br />Life is harder for today’s generation than the previous generation?<br />Life is more complicated for today’s generation than the previous generation?<br />Disagree<br />Agree<br />Disagree<br />Agree<br />Colmar Brunton’s Young Blokes and their Dad’s Survey 2010; Father’s of teenage sons (n=150); Teenage sons (n=150) <br />
  42. 42. For further information please contact:<br />Spencer Willis, Director – Youth Insights<br />Colmar Brunton, a Millward Brown Company<br />Level 1, Colmar Brunton House<br />6-10 The Strand<br />Takapuna, Auckland 0622<br />PO Box 3622, Auckland 0740<br />Mobile 021 455 297<br />Phone (09) 919 9241 | Fax (09) 919 9201<br />www.colmarbrunton.co.nz<br />
  43. 43. Important InformationMarket Research Society of New Zealand [MRSNZ] Code of Practice <br />Colmar Brunton practitioners are members of the MRSNZ are obliged to comply with the MRSNZ Code of Practice. A copy of the Code is available from the Executive Secretary or the Complaints Officer of the Society.<br />Confidentiality<br />Reports and other records relevant to a Market Research project and provided by the Researcher shall normally be for use solely by the Client and the Client’s consultants or advisers.<br />Research Information<br />Article 25 of the MRSNZ Code states:<br />The research technique and methods used in a Marketing Research project do not become the property of the Client, who has no exclusive right to their use.<br />Marketing research proposals, discussion papers and quotations, unless these have been paid for by the client, remain the property of the Researcher.<br />They must not be disclosed by the Client to any third party, other than to a consultant working for a Client on that project. In particular, they must not be used by the Client to influence proposals or cost quotations from other researchers.<br />Publication of a Research Project<br />Article 31 of the MRSNZ Code states:<br />Where a client publishes any of the findings of a research project the client has a responsibility to ensure these are not misleading. The Researcher must be consulted and agree in advance to the form and content for publication. Where this does not happen the Researcher is entitled to:<br />Refuse permission for their name to be quoted in connection with the published findings<br />Publish the appropriate details of the project<br />Correct any misleading aspects of the published presentation of the findings<br />Electronic Copies<br />Electronic copies of reports, presentations, proposals and other documents must not be altered or amended if that document is still identified as a Colmar Brunton document. The authorised original of all electronic copies and hard copies derived from these are held to be that retained by Colmar Brunton.<br />

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