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CB Youth 20 Somethings Presentation Final

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CB Youth 20 Somethings Presentation Final

  1. 1. © Colmar Brunton 2010 1
  2. 2. The 20 something’s… They’ve just spent the best part of 20 years living with their parents and educating themselves in preparation for their entry into the ‘real world’. During their time in their 20s many New Zealanders will graduate from University and have to get their first ‘real’ job, start contemplating marriage and children, come to terms with new responsibilities and many will realise the real world is tougher, more competitive and less forgiving than they had imagined. Needless to say, a lot of change goes on in these 10 years – which makes this such a fascinating topic to research. © Colmar Brunton 2010 2
  3. 3. The 20 something’s… The current breed of 20 somethings were born between 1982, the year Michael Jackson released Thriller, and 1991 the final year the first Gulf War. This generation was brought up in a dynamic and ever changing world with the widespread proliferation of new media, the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Dolly the Sheep, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Mariah Carey, Nirvana, Super Mario Brothers and Chernobyl. So with this background, what is important to this current group of 20 something’s? What can we learn from them? How can we reach them? Are there any sub currents running through this age group? CB Youth thought we’d have a look… © Colmar Brunton 2010 3
  4. 4. …but first, housekeeping Project was in field between SAMPLE 18th January and 1st February 493 Interviews 2011 52% Female / 48% Male Average length respondents All Aged 20 – 29 took to complete was 12 (40% 20 – 24 / 60% 25 – 29) minutes Methodology Survey completed online Respondents incentivised with the FlyBuys reward system © Colmar Brunton 2010 4
  5. 5. For our 20 something’s being rewarded in the work place, be it by beinggiven a pay rise or simply by being complimented at work, is enjoyed moreso than sporting victories. Professional endorsement is far more importantfor young women than young men. Not Fussed Like it Love it 6.1 Getting paid 5.9 6.3 Getting a 5.2 compliment at work 4.9 5.5 Getting a pay 6.3 rise Winning when you 4.7 play sport Watching your 3.9 favourite sports team win 3.5 4.4 Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 5
  6. 6. First dates and partying are more of a younger 20’s thing than the oldertwenties, maybe suggesting maturity levels changing in the mid to latetwenties. Not Fussed Like it Love it Having sex 5.8 Those in full time study enjoy getting out of class and going on a first date significantly more, so do our ethnic minorities Going on a 3.1 first date Partying rated significantly higher amongst our 20-24yo respondents Partying 4.0 Meeting up 5.6 with friends 5.3 5.9 Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 6
  7. 7. Females being more home bodies is evident in these questions, whichcombined with their professional drivers and stronger love for positiveaffirmation may suggest that young Kiwi females are working harder atachieving a work life balance than young males. Not Fussed Like it Love it 5.7 Relaxing at home 5.5 6.0 Significantly higher amongst Maori and Pacific Islanders Seeing Mum 5.0 /Dad 4.6 5.5 Playing with younger 4.1 family members 3.8 4.5 Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 7
  8. 8. Top 5 ‘love’ moments of 20 somethings…. Not Fussed Like it Love it Getting a pay 6.3 rise 6.1 Getting paid Having sex 5.8 Relaxing 5.7 at home Meeting up 5.6 with friends Kiwi 20 somethings rank getting financially rewarded for work better than sex, in fact chilling on the couch is just as good Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 8
  9. 9. Making the effort to do the right thing… Some research suggests that youth care about a raft of social issues such as the environment, government, community, family etc. The following questions ask HOW much they care. Do they actively participate and make an effort or do they just care when asked. We’ve tried to look beyond the attitude and examine the behaviour. Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 9
  10. 10. One third of our respondents stated they consciously change theirbehaviour to do whatever they can for the environment! The Environment 64% Significantly higher 33% amongst South Islanders (excluding CHC) (12%) 4% I care a lot and I do the basics like I don’t think about consciously change recycle but ultimately it, it’s not a topic I’m my behaviour to do I don’t go out of my concerned about whatever I can way to change my behaviour Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 10
  11. 11. Males and ethnic minorities are more actively engaged in government andpolitics than females Government and Politics 67% 59% 51%Significantly higher amongst ethnic minorities (44%) 33% 23% 18% 16% 19% 14% I care a lot and actively I vote and listen to current I’m not bothered, I try to understand policies affairs but I’m not going wouldn’t be concerned and what’s going on out of my way to find out about not voting Total Males Significantly higher than total at 95% Females Significantly lower than total at 95% Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 11
  12. 12. Local government and councils don’t actively engage the 20s something’s!This is even worse in Wellington of all places! Local Government and Councils 55% 33% Significantly higher amongst ethnic minorities (29%) 12% Significantly higher amongst Wellingtonians (48%) I care a lot and I vote and read about I’m not bothered, I did actively try to local issues but I’m not not vote in the last understand policies going out of my way local govt elections and what’s going on to find out Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 12
  13. 13. The 20 somethings are hospitable but do not actively get to know theirneighbours. Regional influences play a large part in this equation with SouthIslanders more likely to be actively involved with their communitys andWellingtonians not bothered Community 68% Significantly higher Significantly higher amongst South amongst Islanders (excluding Wellingtonians (48%) CHC) (33%) 20% 11% I always make an effort to I say hello to my I don’t know my get to know my neighbours but don’t neighbours and I’m cool neighbours and feel part know them and I don’t go with that of the local community out of my way to get involved in community events Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 13
  14. 14. 7 in 10 of our 20 somethings put their family first, this is primarily driven byyoung females…check out the males, 41% of whom admit to ‘rather beingdoing my own thing” Family Significantly higher amongst those with 80% higher incomes ($60- $80K) (46%) 69% 57% 41% 30% 19% 1% 2% 1% I regularly visit and make I like seeing my family but I put in very little effort, I contact with my family. sometimes I’d rather be leave it up to others to Family comes first doing my own thing and I arrange stuff don’t always make an effort Total Males Females Significantly higher than total at 95% Significantly lower than total at 95% Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 14
  15. 15. 6 out of 10 20 somethings have a degree, does this mean the bar has beenraised in terms of getting a degree to some professional advantage? 59% have a 81% work, or degree or other intend to work, in tertiary the field to which qualification their degree or 20% are qualification is currently relevant working on Significantly higher amongst our 25- it 29yo respondents (67%) while 68% are happy Our ethnic minorities significantly more of our 20-24yo’s are still with the choice aren’t as happy with in class (33%) they made in their choices so far and significantly regards to their more wish they had Not surprisingly, those currently studying chosen a different were significantly more likely to state degree/qualificati degree/qualification that they are intending to work in the on or career path (29%) field their degree is relevant to (96%) and that they are happy with their choices so far (79%) Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old who have a degree or tertiary qualification (n=390) © Colmar Brunton 2010 15
  16. 16. Our happiness scale… The importance of making good Now that’s the (community) spirit. decisions. Our respondents who earlier Those who wish they had chosen a stated they always make an effort different career path (6.9) or to get to know their neighbours degree (6.8) are significantly less are significantly happier (7.9) likely to rate themselves ‘happy’ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Mean 7.5 Just alright Very Happy Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 16
  17. 17. Things you want to achieve and by when….. Before 35 Next 2-3 Years MostImportant Buy a new car Be recognised as a leader or expert in my field Learn something new Make my parents even more proud of me Those aged 20-24 are Be recognised as a leader Learn something new less likely to want to or expert in my field travel for a minimum of 3 months (5.4 v 6.3 Make my parents even Buy a new car for 25-29yo) more proud of me Those aged 20-24 Have children are more likely to Travel for a minimum of 3 want to get married months (5.2), have children Travel for a minimum of 3 (6.6), and less likely Be happier than I am now months to want to travel for a minimum of 3 Have children Buy a house months (4.6 v 5.9 for 25-29yo). 25-29yo on the other hand are Buy a house Be happier than I am now less likely to want to have children (5.4). Double current salary Get / stay married Less Get / stay married Double current salaryImportant Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493) © Colmar Brunton 2010 17
  18. 18. Females seem to be much more focused on achieving a smaller numberof goals in the next 2 to 3 years and there is a strong focus on earningrespect. There is an obvious friction between the desire of fatherhood andfemale priorities Before 35 Next 2-3 Years Buy a new car Have children Make my parents even more proud of me Make my parents even more proud of me Travel for a minimum of 3 months Buy a new car Learn something new Be recognised as a leader or expert in my field Be recognised as a leader or expert in my field Learn something new Have children Buy a house Buy a house Travel for a minimum of 3 months Be happier than I am now Get / stay married Double current salary Be happier than I am now Get / stay married Double current salary Be recognised as a leader or expert in my field Be recognised as a leader or expert in my field Learn something new Make my parents even more proud of me Buy a new car Learn something new Make my parents even more proud of me Buy a new car Travel for a minimum of 3 months Have children Be happier than I am now Travel for a minimum of 3 months Double current salary Buy a house Buy a house Be happier than I am now Have children Double current salary Get / stay married Get / stay married Base: New Zealanders aged 20-29 years old (n=493); Males (n=236); Females (n=257) © Colmar Brunton 2010 18
  19. 19. The $10,000 question…what would you spend $10k on? (Not allowed to say debt) 49% would spend some of it 27% would spend on a holiday or 18% would some of it on a new house, or travel spend some of it improvements to on a new car or their current house improvements to their current car Those with low incomes are significantly more likely to donate 17% of New some of the money Zealanders with to charity Our ethnic minorities Maori or Pacific Only 1 female in are more likely to Island heritage our entire sample spend some of the would give gift stated that she cash on education some of it to family would invest some and investments while and friends of the money, while only 27% would 16 males said they spend some on a would holiday or travel © Colmar Brunton 2010 19
  20. 20. What brands do they love and what brands do they like……the first surpriseis the lack of premium high end, aspirational brands in the love lists, thesecond surprise is the similarity between the love and like lists Love Like 20-24 25-29 20-24 25-29 1 Sony Apple Sony Sony 2 Apple Sony Adidas Apple 3 Coca Cola Coca Cola Nike Nike 4 Cadbury Adidas Coca Cola Adidas 5 Nike Cadbury Apple Samsung 6 Adidas Nike Glassons Nokia 7 Nokia Toyota Billabong Watties 8 Samsung Holden Nokia Coca Cola 9 Billabong Samsung Samsung Cadbury 10 Toyota Audi Hewlett Packard Toyota © Colmar Brunton 2010 20
  21. 21. Is this a case of growing up and love no longer being mystical, its nowabout relationships and 20 somethings want a relationship with a brand, orat least an attachment …how else does Wattie’s and Homebrand appear on the same list as Apple and Karen Walker © Colmar Brunton 2010 21
  22. 22. The like list shows brands they are in touch with, the ones that are thereand making a connection… © Colmar Brunton 2010 22
  23. 23. Summary • 20 somethings are the perfect example of why we don’t treat youth (15 – 30) as one group, the love / like brand study should be evidence of that • When managing Gen Y in the work place, it maybe worth considering breaking with PC rules and acknowledging that men and women are different, not so in their need for financial recognition, but in their response to encouragement • Youth will also say the right thing, but doing is another matter. Brands or organisations that help facilitate such as better environmental behaviour, will win favour because you’re helping their ‘intentions’ © Colmar Brunton 2010 23
  24. 24. Summary • Education is becoming challenging and expensive, a degree is no longer a unique achievement and some companies are looking for Masters or Post Grads. This is potentially a game changer and may contribute to the hunger or appearance that they feel they deserve more • The disparity in attitude between Baby Boomers and Gen Y in the work place maybe better understood when we think Gen Y find getting paid a better feeling than sex – they’re desperate for the reward they feel they deserve / need • Females seem to be much more focused on achieving a smaller number of goals in the next 2 to 3 years and there is a strong focus on earning respect. The friction between the male desire for fatherhood and female priorities could be challenging © Colmar Brunton 2010 24
  25. 25. For further information please contact:Spencer WillisColmar Brunton, a Millward Brown CompanyLevel 1, Colmar Brunton House6-10 The StrandTakapuna, Auckland 0622PO Box 3622, Auckland 0740Phone (09) 919 9238 | Mobile 021 455 297www.colmarbrunton.co.nz © Colmar Brunton 2010 25

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