Team6 updated adhd_computer_assisted_presentation[1]

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Team6 updated adhd_computer_assisted_presentation[1]

  1. 1. Group Members: Nicole Rivers Kerry Graham Natalia Wilson Abigail ChristopherADHD
  2. 2. INTRODUCTIONGood morning to everyone and welcome to team six workshop on ADHDwhich means Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. It is our privilege tostand here to let you all know that children with disabilities can, and are ableto do the work as a “normal” child in the classroom. However they cannotachieve this by themselves, but with the aid of the teacher, the proper use ofthe technology, and correct technology in the classroom, things will be ofgreat success with these children. Today we will be focusing on the child thathas ADHD and the technologies that can be used, and the ways teachers canteach them in the classroom. Sit back and enjoy today’s proceedings.
  3. 3. As it was mention before that ADHD means, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.Then what can we say about ADHD. ADHD is “a condition of the brain that makes it hard for children to control their behavior”. Therefore can we say that there are ADHD students in our classroom? Think about it.How would you know as a teacher that a child has ADHD? There are signs and symptoms that you as a teacher can look for.
  4. 4. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMSInattention: Easily distracted, poor short term memoryHyperactivity: Excessive restlessness, in constant motionImpulsivity: Acts without thought or safetyEmotional Instability: Easily frustrated, tantrums, moody, impatient, intolerant, extremes of feeling, irrational, overreact to touch, pain and sound. Peer rejection, low self esteem.
  5. 5. SOLUTIONS USED IN TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH ADHD
  6. 6. Teachers who are successful in educating children with ADHD use a three-pronged strategy/solution. They begin by:Identifying the unique needs of the child. For example, the teacher determines how, when, and why the child is inattentive, impulsive, and hyperactive. The teacherassess the unique educational needs and strengths of a child with ADHD in the class.Assessments, such as learning style inventories, can be used to determine childrens strengths and enable instruction to build on their existing abilities.Selects different educational practices associated with academic instruction, behavioral interventions, and classroom accommodations that are appropriate to meet that childs needs.The teacher determines which instructional practices will meet the academic and behavioral needs identified for the child. Select practices that fit the content
  7. 7. Combines these practices into an individualized educational program (IEP) or other individualized plan and integrates this program with educational activities provided to other children in the class.The teacher develops /creates an IEP to reflect annual goals and the special education-related services, along with supplementary aids and services necessary for attaining those goals.
  8. 8. STRATEGIES FOR COMBATINGHYPERACTIVITY CONSIST OF CREATIVEWAYS TO ALLOW THE CHILD WITHADD/ADHD TO MOVE IN APPROPRIATEWAYS AT APPROPRIATE TIMES
  9. 9.  Ask children with ADD/ADHD to run an errand or do a task for you, even if it just means walking across the room to sharpen pencils or put dishes away. Encourage the child to play a sport—or at least run around before and after school. Provide a stress ball, small toy, or other object for the child to squeeze or play with discreetly at his or her seat. Limit screen time in favor of time for movement. Make sure a child with ADD/ADHD never misses recess or P.E.
  10. 10. ADD / ADHD AND SCHOOL: HELPINGCHILDREN WITH ADHD SUCCEED ATSCHOOLhttp://www.educationworld.com/a_issues/issues148c.shtml
  11. 11. 20 TIPS TO TEACH KIDS WHO HAVE ADHDWhen teachers understand the struggle of a student with ADHD, they can better help that student in the classroom. Because children with ADHD do better when their lives are ordered and predictable, the most important things teachers can do for those children is establish a calm, structured classroom environment with clear and consistent rules and regular classroom routines.
  12. 12. CHADD and the American Academy of Pediatrics offer suggestions on what teachers can do in the classroom to help students who have ADHD: Display classroom rules. Classroom rules must be very clear and concise. Provide clear and concise instructions for academic assignments. Break complex instructions into small parts. Show students how to use an assignment book to keep track of their homework and daily assignments. Post a daily schedule and homework assignments in the same place each day. Tape a copy on the childs desk. Plan academic subjects for the morning hours. Provide regular and frequent breaks. Seat the child away from distractions and next to students who will be positive role models.
  13. 13. Form small group settings when possible. Children with ADHD can become easily distracted in large groups.Find a quiet spot in the classroom (such as a place in the back of the room) where students can go to do their work away from distractions.Train the student with ADHD to recognize "begin work" cues.Establish a secret signal with the child to use as a reminder when he or she is off task.Help the child with transitions between other classes and activities by providing clear directions and cues, such as a five-minute warning before the transition.
  14. 14. Assign tutors to help children with ADHD stay on task. Tutors can help them get more work done in less time and provide constant reinforcement.Focus on a specific behavior you wish to improve and reinforce it. Teachers can reinforce target behaviors by paying attention to the behavior, praising the child, and awarding jobs and extra free time.Offer more positive reinforcements than negative consequences.Explain to the student what to do to avoid negative consequences.Reward target behaviors immediately and continuously.Use negative consequences only after a positive reinforcement program has enough time to become effective.Deliver negative consequences in a firm, business-like way without emotion, lectures, or long-winded explanations.
  15. 15. TECHNOLOGY
  16. 16. Teacher Student Collaboration:Math Software and Gadgets These tools help ADHD students who struggle with computing, aligning, and copying math problems on paper.Electronic math worksheet software enables students to organize and work through problems on a computer screen. Numbers that appear onscreen can be read aloud by a speech synthesizer.Talking calculators have a built-in speech synthesizer that reads aloud each number, symbol, or operation key a student presses, as well as the answer. The aural feedback lets an attention deficit student know whether he pressed the right keys and verifies the answer before he transfers it to paper.Portable word processors are lightweight devices that look like a computer keyboard with a screen. They can be helpful to ADHD children who have trouble with handwriting. These battery-powered machines can be brought to school for note-taking and writing assignments.
  17. 17. REFERENCES Technologyhttp://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/6585-2.html ADHD: A brief Introduction for teachershttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbgEwUKQbGQ Top 10 reasons to use technology in education- ADHD: A brief introduction for teachers.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzi2RIt8_nk Technology in the Classroom: Amplified Classrooms Help Educationhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbEbBrE6L7Q

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