KY: Introduction Green Infrastructure

1,060 views

Published on

Introduction Green Infrastructure

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,060
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

KY: Introduction Green Infrastructure

  1. 1. Chapter 7    Green Infrastructure   A. Introduction   “Green infrastructure” refers to natural and engineered ecological systems that act as living infrastructure, integrating natural vegetation and soils into a community’s infrastructure through a variety of techniques, approaches, technologies, and practices.  Green infrastructure is planned and managed primarily for stormwater control, but it also provides additional social, economic, and environmental benefits.  It can be a useful tool for communities that are looking to protect their natural water resources and stormwater management systems from the impacts of development and urbanization.  Green infrastructure methods can be implemented practically anywhere soil and vegetation can be worked into a landscape.    Source: Southeast Watershed Forum Figure 7-1: Bioretention is one typical method used in green infrastructure.     141
  2. 2. B. Types of Green Infrastructure    Communities may choose from a wide variety of green infrastructure techniques.  The choice of which techniques to employ and where to locate them is dependent on site specifications and the goals the community wishes to accomplish.  Specific types of green infrastructure include:   1. Green Roofs    Green roofs are roofs of buildings that are covered with vegetation and soil, either partially or completely.  Green roofs are layered systems, with a waterproof membrane, drainage mat, root barrier, growing medium, and vegetation.  Evaporation of water occurs due to the exposure of the plants and growing medium to wind and sun, and the plants transpire moisture into the air.  This helps to cool the roof.  It is vital that plants are chosen for the environment in which the roof is located.  It is also important to promote slow to moderate growth of the plants, so that they are in balance with their root systems during dormant winter periods.  Green roofs can aid in stormwater management and can save energy.  They are also aesthetically pleasing.  Source: Louisville Metro Development Center Figure 7-2: Green Roof Design 142
  3. 3. 2. Rain Gardens    Rain gardens, also called bioretention basins, are planted topographic depressions that are designed to absorb rainwater that drains from impervious areas, such as roofs, parking areas, streets, walkways, and compacted lawn areas.  Rain gardens reduce runoff because the stormwater soaks into the ground instead of flowing into storm drains and surface waters.  This can help decrease erosion, water pollution, and flooding, and can help to recharge groundwater sources.  The Rain Garden Network provides a 10‐step synopsis of how to build a rain garden.  This information is available at http://www.raingardennetwork.com/build.htm.  Additionally, Burnsville, Minnesota has implemented a plan to install a rain garden system to infiltrate stormwater runoff that serves as an excellent example of utilizing this type of green infrastructure (City of Burnsville 2006).   Source: Southeast Watershed Forum Figure 7-3: Rain Garden. 143
  4. 4. 3. Porous and Pervious Pavements    Porous and pervious pavements, also called permeable pavements, are paving methods that allow rainwater to infiltrate through them into the soil below.  These pavements can be used for roads, parking lots, and walkways instead of traditional impervious pavements, which increase flow velocity of stormwater runoff.  Porous asphalt, concrete, paving stones, and bricks are examples of pervious pavements.   Source: Southeast Watershed Forum  Figure 7-4: Pervious Pavement. 144
  5. 5. 4. Vegetated Swales    Vegetated swales, also known as bioswales, are wide, shallow channels that are covered on the side slopes and bottom by a dense stand of native vegetation.  Vegetated swales are designed to promote infiltration, reduce the flow velocity of stormwater runoff, and trap particulate pollutants and silt.  They can be either natural or constructed, and are often used around parking lots so that pollution from automobiles that is picked up in stormwater can be treated before entering the watershed.  Source: Southeast Watershed Forum  Figure 7-5: Vegetated Swale. 5. Pocket Wetlands    Pocket wetlands receive, retain, and treat stormwater that has drained from a limited impervious area.  Not only do they reduce stormwater runoff, but they also provide for the filtering of pollutants.  Additionally, pocket wetlands are aesthetically pleasing and can even serve as a small wildlife habitat.  Pocket wetlands do not require as much space as other stormwater treatment, so they can be very helpful in congested urban areas.      145
  6. 6. 6. Planter Boxes    There are two types of planter boxes, contained planters and infiltration planters.  Contained planters are planter boxes that are placed over impervious surfaces.  They hold trees, shrubs, and ground cover.  Infiltration planters are containers or structures with open bottoms that contain a layer of gravel, soil, and vegetation.  They are designed to allow stormwater runoff to temporarily pool on top of the soil and then slowly infiltrate into the ground.  Stone, concrete, brick, plastic lumber, or wood can all be used to construct infiltration planters.  Portland, Oregon provides an excellent example of utilizing planter boxes for stormwater management (City of Portland, 2004, pp. 49‐60).   7. Green Parking    Green parking refers to parking lot design that incorporates green infrastructure instead of only considering purely functional requirements.  Green parking involves managing stormwater on‐site, providing generous landscaped areas, planting trees, enhancing pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, and reducing the urban heat island effect.  Toronto has implemented a plan for “greening” surface parking lots (City of Toronto 2007).  Source: Rosetta Fackler  Figures 7-6 to 7-9: A green parking lot design at a Walmart in Nashville, TN. 146
  7. 7. 8. Rain Barrels    Rain barrels, also called rainwater tanks, are water containers that are used to collect and store rain water.  The rainwater is usually collected from rooftops via rain gutters.  Rain barrels help to reduce the amount of untreated stormwater runoff into wastewater systems and surface waters.  The water stored in rain barrels can be recycled for many uses, including water gardens, washing cars, agriculture, and home use.  They can also simply store stormwater to be released at a future time.     9. Downspout Disconnection    Downspout disconnection systems redirect stormwater from traditional collection systems to vegetated areas.  By doing so, green infrastructure components can manage the runoff and stormwater volume is removed from collection systems.   10. Community Forestry and Trees    Trees and forests are essential elements of a community’s green infrastructure.  These include not only public and private forest lands but also community forests: the canopy of trees in our communities’ yards, parks, roadsides and streetscapes, commercial centers, common areas, and public spaces.  They provide many environmental and economic benefits to property owners, communities, and watersheds.  The benefits of trees and community forests to water resources include:   “Tree root networks filter contaminants in soils producing clean  water.   Trees prevent erosion by trapping soil that would otherwise  become silt.  Silt destroys fish eggs and other aquatic wildlife and  makes rivers and streams shallower, causing more frequent and  more severe flooding.  Trees along streams also hold stream banks  in place to protect against flooding.   Trees reduce topsoil erosion, prevent harmful land pollutants  contained in the soil from getting into our waterways, slow down  water runoff, and ensure that our groundwater supplies are  continually being replenished.  For every 5% of tree cover added  to a community, stormwater runoff is reduced by approximately  2%.   Studies that have simulated urban forest effects on stormwater  report annual runoff reductions of 2‐7%.   In one study, a 32‐foot tall tree intercepting rainfall reduced  stormwater runoff by 327 gallons.”  (Southeast Watershed Forum,  p. 2)    In addition to water‐based benefits, trees and community forests provide air quality, climate moderation, energy conservation, and wildlife habitat benefits  147
  8. 8. (Southeast Watershed Forum, pp. 2‐3).  “According to USDA Forest Service, trees and vegetation reduce stormwater discharge by up to 40%, reduce home heating and cooling costs by up to 30%, increase the value of property by up to 20%, and reduce particulate airborne pollution by up to 80%.”  (Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center 2006)  In particular, the economic benefits are many.  These economic benefits to property owners, businesses, and communities, according to studies, include:   “Trees enhance community economic stability by attracting  businesses and tourists.   People linger and shop longer along tree‐lined streets.   Apartments and offices in wooded areas rent more quickly and  have higher occupancy rates.   Businesses leasing office space in developments with trees find  their workers are more productive and absenteeism reduced.   Three trees located strategically around your house can cut air  conditioning bills in half.  On a larger scale, the cooling effects of  trees can save millions of energy dollars.   Property values of homes with trees in the landscape are 5% to  20% higher than equivalent properties without trees.”  (Southeast  Watershed Forum, p. 1) Moreover, studies show that the benefits of large trees are 4 to 16 times the benefits of small trees, depending on whether the benefits are analyzed over a short term or a long term and whether only benefits to the landowner are analyzed or whether benefits to the entire community are analyzed (Southeast Watershed Forum, p. 3).    Communities can do many different things to establish or protect trees as green infrastructure.  First, communities can establish a tree canopy goal as part of their comprehensive plan.  Studies recommend that healthy cities should seek to have at least 40% tree coverage, which is an average of 20 large trees per acre, in order to achieve ecological, economic, and social sustainability (Southeast Watershed Forum, p. 1).  Second, communities should establish a community forestry program that supports both public and private efforts to provide, maintain, and manage local tree canopies.  Whether or not a part of a community forestry program, government agencies should landscape public lands and facilities with watershed‐sustaining trees and invest in maintaining those trees.  Third, communities can use their codes and ordinances to protect existing trees and require tree planning and maintenance on development sites.  Fourth, communities can establish watershed reforestation projects that prioritize sites for reforestation under a comprehensive watershed forest management plan (Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center 2006).       148
  9. 9.   Case Study in Community Forestry: Fayetteville, Arkansas  (Source: NALGEP et al. 2003, p. 21)    “A number of communities across the nation are partnering with groups like American Forests to identify how the “green infrastructure” of trees can help reduce stormwater runoff and nonpoint source pollution, protect the quality of surface and groundwater, save localities millions of dollars in gray infrastructure costs, and meet the regulatory mandates of storm‐water and TMDL rules.  One such community is the fast‐growing City of Fayetteville, Arkansas, where American Forests recently released a study demonstrating the environmental and economic benefits of maintaining – and increasing – local tree cover.    In Fayetteville, rapid growth and development has led to an 18 percent decline of heavy tree canopy in the last 15 years.  American Forests recently conducted an “Urban Ecosystems Analysis” using satellite and aerial imagery, Geographic Information System technology, scientific research, and the organization’s CITYgreen® computer software to calculate the benefits trees provide to Fayetteville’s urban environment.  The findings show that the City of Fayetteville’s existing tree cover currently reduces stormwater runoff by 50 million cubic feet during a storm event.  The study also noted that, if the tree canopy in Fayetteville were increased from 27 to 40 percent, the environmental benefits  Source: Tony Arnold would be significant and the cost‐saving benefits of stormwater  Figure 7-10: Forest in Kentucky.reduction alone would be $135 million.”  (NALGEP et al. 2003, p. 21)    149
  10. 10.   11. Protecting Riparian Lands, Wetlands, Floodplains, and Native Landscapes    Nature has already provided much of the green infrastructure that we need in the forms of riparian zones (often with trees and other vegetation), wetlands, floodplains, and native vegetation.  Forest, discussed above, and native grasslands also are naturally provided green infrastructure.  Unfortunately, much of it has been lost to human land‐alteration activities and what remains is at risk of alteration or degradation.  Therefore, a critical green infrastructure strategy is to preserve and protect nature’s green infrastructure, while also restoring that which has been lost.  Source: Linda Pearsall  Figures 7-11 and 7-12: Wetland and Riparian Zone. 12. Specific Examples of Green Infrastructure Features   in Particular Development Settings    The following provides some examples of how these types of green infrastructure can be utilized in particular settings (WERF 2007):    Streetscape and roadway projects  - Add tree boxes or infiltration gardens to capture street runoff.  150
  11. 11. - Design medians as infiltration areas.  - Use porous pavement for parking lanes.     Commercial areas with significant parking  - Drain roofs to gardens, planters, or parking islands and  medians.  - Use permeable pavement in low‐traffic areas.  - Drain parking to grass buffers and vegetated swales.     Small infill building sites or retrofits  - Install a green roof for buildings and parking structures.  - Install permeable pavement in courtyards and plazas.  - Drain roofs to grass buffers or swales.     Residential areas  - Drain roofs to rain gardens, grass swales, and grass buffers.  - Drain driveways, walkways, and patios to adjacent rain  gardens or grass buffers.  - Construct driveways using permeable pavement.    Examples of green infrastructure and policies supporting green infrastructure can be found on the following websites:    Center for Neighborhood Technology, Green Infrastructure,  http://greenvalues.cnt.org/green‐infrastructure     State Environmental Resource Center, Green Infrastructure Policy Issues  Package, http://www.serconline.org/grInfrastructure/index.html     U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency, Managing Wet Weather with  Green Infrastructure,  http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/home.cfm?program_id=298     Water Environment Research Foundation, Livable Communities,  http://www.werf.org/livablecommunities    C. Choosing Green: The Benefits of Green Infrastructure   Green infrastructure can provide a variety of environmental, economic, and social benefits.  These benefits can be especially pronounced in developed area because environmental damage is usually greater and green space more limited in these locales.  The benefits of green infrastructure include:      151
  12. 12. 1. Green infrastructure improves water quality.  Green infrastructure reduces the concentration of pollutants in stormwater runoff.  It does so by causing runoff to infiltrate close to its source, thus helping to prevent pollutants from being transported to surface waters.  Additionally, plants and microbes can naturally filter and breakdown stormwater pollutants in infiltrated runoff.     2. Green infrastructure reduces and delays stormwater runoff volumes.   Green infrastructure utilizes the natural retention and infiltration capabilities of vegetation and soils to naturally retain and absorb stormwater, thus reducing the volume of stormwater runoff, as well as reducing stormwater runoff peak flows.  Green infrastructure also increases the amount of pervious ground cover, which in turn increases stormwater infiltration rates.  This also reduces the volume of runoff.  By reducing runoff volumes and peak flows entering surface water bodies and wastewater systems, green infrastructure limits the frequency of flooding and system overflow events.     3. Green infrastructure improves air quality.   Green infrastructure contributes to improved air quality.  Vegetation and trees absorb pollutants from the air, thus filtering many airborne pollutants.  They also cool the air, leading to decreased ground‐level ozone pollution.    4. Green infrastructure enhances water supplies.   Green infrastructure increases natural infiltration, thus improving the rate at which groundwater aquifers are replenished.  Improved groundwater recharge can enhance private and public drinking water supplies, and can help to maintain normal base flow rates for streams and rivers.  In addition, green infrastructure techniques that capture and use stormwater help to conserve water supplies.  5. Green infrastructure reduces energy demands   and increases energy efficiency.   The increased amounts of green space and vegetation provided by green infrastructure in developed areas can reduce energy demands because they mitigate the urban heat island effect, thus lowering temperatures.  This can also lower the demand for air conditioning energy, thus decreasing power plant emissions.  If incorporated on and around buildings, green infrastructure can help with shade and insulation, thus decreasing the energy that is needed for heating and cooling.  Additionally, diverting stormwater from wastewater systems reduces the energy needed to pump and treat the water.  All of this reduces energy costs to businesses, governments, and community residents.  152
  13. 13. 6. Green infrastructure improves human health.   Green infrastructure can play a vital role in improving human health.  A large number of studies show that green space and vegetation can positively impact human health, including reduced levels of inner‐city crime, a stronger sense of community, and reduced symptoms associated with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders (U.S. EPA 2009).  7. Green infrastructure enhances communities and neighborhoods.   Green infrastructure can improve the aesthetics of a community because of the increase in trees and plants.  It also provides increased access to recreational space and wildlife habitats, thus improving community livability.  Community cohesiveness can be enhanced by involving residents with the planning, implementation, and maintenance of green infrastructure sites.  Additionally, a number of studies show that green infrastructure can increase the property values in the surrounding area (U.S. EPA 2009).  8. Green infrastructure moderates the impacts of climate change.   Green infrastructure can benefit adaptability for a wide range of circumstances that result from climate change impacts.  This adaptability is possible because green infrastructure can conserve and reuse water, promote groundwater recharge, and reduce surface water discharges that can cause flooding.  Additionally, the vegetation utilized in green infrastructure can serve as sources of carbon sequestration, thus capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.    9. Green infrastructure saves money.    Green infrastructure can save capital costs associated with building,  operating, and maintaining traditional forms of infrastructure.  The costs of repairing damage caused by stormwater can also be avoided.     D. Implementing Green Infrastructure in Projects      Once a community has decided that utilizing green infrastructure may be an option, it must then assess if this is the best option.  One method that can be used when determining whether, or where, to incorporate green infrastructure is “value engineering.” This approach allows for a comparison of the costs and values of green infrastructure with that of traditional infrastructure.  “Value engineering” enables a community to consider the relative costs and benefits of the components of a project, and then suggests where changes may be made to provide more value for less cost.   The “value engineering” approach involves the following steps (WERF 2007):   153
  14. 14.  Identify elements of value or benefit that can be used to measure and  compare project components.  Factors that can be considered when  identifying elements of value or benefit are land area requirements  for flood storage and water quality treatment, allowable or desired  runoff volume, on‐site water use requirements, groundwater recharge  needs, landscape amenities opportunities, creation of habitat, and  recreation opportunities.     Develop a schematic of the project using traditional forms of  infrastructure, and estimate the value or benefit provided, along with  capital and life cycle costs.     Develop an alternative schematic of the project using green  infrastructure, and estimate value and costs of each component.”     Compare the two different approaches to identify which provides the  best value.  This is not strictly a cost‐based analysis.      Once it is decided that a green infrastructure approach will be utilized, and projects begin to be planned, the following principles and practices can help to ensure that a green infrastructure project succeeds:   Establish an interdisciplinary team at the beginning of the project.   This group should include, among others, community leaders, the  project owner, review agencies, engineers, and landscape architects.   Work to ensure that this team remains together through  implementation of the project.   Understand the regulatory and development review environment.     Understand which Best Management Practices work best in which  development settings.   Understand the context in which the project will be placed.  The type  of project, as well as its aesthetic qualities, should reflect surrounding  land uses and neighborhood character.   Design the project to mimic the natural environment.   Design sustainable projects that can be easily maintained (WERF  2007).   E. Implementing Green Infrastructure in Local Policies and Codes    Green infrastructure is a matter of public policy, as well as landowner and developer choices.  In general, when a community has determined that green infrastructure would be beneficial, certain policy recommendations can be used to encourage the use of green infrastructure:   get development right the first time;   incorporate green infrastructure into long‐term control plans for  managing combined sewer overflows;  154
  15. 15.  revise state and local stormwater regulations to encourage green  design;    establish dedicated funding for stormwater management that rewards  green design;   provide incentives for residential and commercial use of green  infrastructure;    review and revise local development ordinances;   preserve existing trees, open space, and stream buffers;   encourage and use smart growth; and   get the community involved (NRDC 2006, pp. 13‐15).    More specifically, though, incorporating green infrastructure into wet growth policies requires attention to local codes and ordinances.  Although some of a community’s green infrastructure will result from public projects (e.g., government buildings and facilities, landscape design and management along roads and highways, and wetlands or stream restoration initiatives) or from the management of public lands (including parks, nature areas, and recreational facilities, wet growth policies also include the creation of green infrastructure on private lands.  Community officials and stakeholders should analyze their local codes and ordinances to determine whether they:   allow green infrastructure as part of new or existing land uses;   encourage green infrastructure as part of new or existing land  uses; and   require green infrastructure as part of new or existing land uses.    First, a community’s land development codes and ordinances might directly or indirectly prohibit landowners and developers from using green infrastructure and therefore need to be changed.  Examples might include: 1) minimum lot sizes or setback requirements that prevent clustering of structures and preservation of existing natural features of development sites; 2) barriers to shared ownership and management of swales, wetlands, and other green infrastructure; 3) requirements that structures connect downspouts directly to the stormwater sewer system; 4) roof design or structural requirements that do not allow for green roofs; or 5) parking requirements that prevent green parking lot design, among other regulatory requirements.  These provisions should be analyzed and amended to allow green infrastructure.    Second, a community’s land development codes and ordinances can actually facilitate decisions by landowners and developers to use green infrastructure.  These might include density bonuses or other development bonuses (e.g., parking bonuses, height bonuses, streamlined/fast‐track permitting processes) for certain especially valuable or extensive green infrastructure features of a development project beyond normal requirements.  They might include rebates of or reductions in stormwater or sewer service or hook‐up fees for certain green infrastructure features that minimize runoff.  They might include relief from landscaping  155
  16. 16. requirements if existing mature trees and other existing natural landscape features are retained.  Local communities should analyze their codes and ordinances for opportunities to add incentives that encourage green infrastructure.    Third, communities should consider requiring landowners and developers to use green infrastructure features, especially for new development.  Examples include 1) tree preservation ordinances; 2) minimum tree canopy and/or landscaping requirements; 3) prohibitions on development of wetlands, riparian buffer zones, natural forests, native grasslands, or similar watershed‐supporting lands; 4) maximum site coverage ratios; and 5) requirements that developers select from a menu of green‐infrastructure best management practices (BMPs) in designing and developing sites, among other possible regulatory requirements.  Protecting or requiring green infrastructure by regulation can be necessary, because developed sites without adequate stormwater management are imposing the costs and harms of their land uses onto neighbors, other property owners, businesses, government agencies, taxpayers, and the public.  Private property rights, even from highly libertarian or free‐market perspectives, have never allowed landowners to use their land in ways that harm others or transfer the costs of their land uses to others (i.e., known by economists as “negative externalities”), which is what is happening when developed land has high quantities, velocities, and/or pollution‐levels of runoff flow.  However, protections of existing green infrastructure and regulations requiring harm‐preventing green infrastructure – especially when landowners can choose among a variety of green infrastructure methods – are cheaper, more efficient, and more effective at preventing harms (and externalized costs) for all relevant parties than the alternative ways of remedying these harms: litigation or fines.  Regulatory methods and examples are discussed further in Chapter 12.  In addition, Chapter 5 explores how green infrastructure might be incorporated into low impact development standards.    Sources:  Center for Neighborhood Technology.  Green Infrastructure.  Available at http://greenvalues.cnt.org/green‐infrastructure.  City of Burnsville, Minnesota.  2006.  Burnsville Stormwater Retrofit Study.  Available at http://www.ci.burnsville.mn.us/DocumentView.asp?DID=449.    City of Portland, Oregon.  2004.  2004 Stormwater Management Manual, Chapter 2, Stormwater Management Facility Design.  Available at http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=55791&#page=49.   City of Toronto.  2007.  Design Guidelines for “Greening” Surface Parking Lots.  Available at  156
  17. 17. http://www.toronto.ca/planning/urbdesign/greening_parking_lots.htm#greenguidelines.   National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals et al. (NALGEP et al.).  2003.  Smart Growth for Clean Water: Helping Communities Address the Water Quality Impacts of Sprawl.  Available at http://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/CustomO93C337F42157.pdf.   Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).  2006.  Rooftops to Rivers: Green Strategies for Controlling Stormwater and Combined Sewer Overflows.  Available at http://www.nrdc.org/water/pollution/rooftops/rooftops.pdf.   Southeast Watershed Forum.  The Value of Community Forests.  Stoner, Nancy and Alexandra Dapolito Dunn.  2008.  “From Rooftops to Rivers: Green Infrastructure Yields Economic and Environmental Benefits.”  American Public Works Association Reporter.  February: 1‐5.  Available at www.apwa.net.   Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center.  2006.  Land Conservation Fact Sheet: Urban Watershed Reforestation.  State Environmental Resource Center.  Green Infrastructure Policy Issues Package.  Available at http://www.serconline.org/grInfrastructure/index.html.  United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA).  2009.  Managing Wet Weather with Green Infrastructure.  Available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes/home.cfm?program_id=298.  Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF).  2007.  When Does Green Infrastructure Make Sense.  Available at http://www.werf.org/livablecommunities/pdf/greenpay.pdf.  Water Environment Research Foundation.  Livable Communities.  Available at http://www.werf.org/livablecommunities.    157

×