Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Sonoma Compassionate Cannabis Policy

51 views

Published on

Sonoma compassionate cannabis policy

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Sonoma Compassionate Cannabis Policy

  1. 1. Sonoma Compassionate Cannabis Policy Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017
  2. 2. Community Concerns Lack of local access Crime Product accessible to children Teen Use Traffic Safety Odor Water use Chemicals and Pesticides Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20172
  3. 3. Why should we have a local dispensary? Patient Issues: • Prop 64 was supported by 62% of Sonoma voters, more than any other county city or the county itself. • Dispensaries provide essentials services that should be readily available within the community. • A rigid policy that bans medical cannabis dispensaries deprives patients of the medicine promised them by the Compassionate Use Act. • Banning dispensaries places unnecessary hardship on patients with limited mobility and financial security.Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20173
  4. 4. Why should we have a local dispensary? Regulated dispensaries are: • legal under California state law • helping to revitalize neighborhoods • bringing new customers to neighboring businesses • not a source of community complaints 1 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20174
  5. 5. Why should we have a local dispensary? Regulated dispensaries benefit the community by: • providing access for the most seriously ill and injured • offering a safer environment for patients than having to buy on the illicit market • improving the health of patients through education and social support • harm reduction for those dependent on narcotics (opioids) and over the counter drugs 2 • having a greater than average customer satisfaction rating for health care Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20175
  6. 6. “Delivery Only” Not an Option Patients often require first hand experience at a physical, walk-in style dispensary that openly displays all options. Not only does a dispensary offer a personal first-hand view, it allows the patient to consult with knowledgeable staff who can provide recommendations as to which strain and dosing methodology may best suit a patient's needs. In the case of delivery, patients are unable to physically preview the medication and determine on their own which item on the menu is best for them until it arrives at the door. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20176
  7. 7. Why should we have a local dispensary? Creating dispensary regulations combats crime because: • dispensary security reduces crime in the vicinity • street sales tend to decrease • patients and operators are vigilant • any criminal activity gets reported to police Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20177
  8. 8. Other Benefits of a Dispensary Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 • Creates jobs • Generates tax revenue • Adding an adult use component offers additional revenue • A valuable source of charitable donations and direct community outreach 8
  9. 9. Crime and Medical Cannabis Dispensaries “Banks are more likely to get robbed than medical marijuana dispensaries.” - Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck 3 • An analysis of robbery and burglary rates at medical cannabis dispensaries conducted by the Denver Police Department found that the robbery and burglary rates at dispensaries were lower than area banks and liquor stores and on par with those of pharmacies.4 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 20179
  10. 10. Crime and Medical Cannabis Dispensaries • In 2015, Metro State University in Denver reported no significant increase in crime trends after retail cannabis outlets began operating in January of the previous year, and were unable to establish a link between legal cannabis operations and particular types of criminal activity.6 • In a 2016 study of 11 western medical cannabis states, researchers found medical cannabis laws to have no negative effect on violent or property crime, and in fact to be associated with significant drops in rates of violent crime.7 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 “I don’t think the data really supports [dispensaries] are more likely to be targeted at this point.” - Colorado Springs Sgt. Darrin Abbink 5 10
  11. 11. Crime and Cannabis Business (Regional) According to a recent city of Petaluma staff report: 8 • Law enforcement agencies in Lake, Marin, and Mendocino counties reported no definitive causal link between sanctioned cannabis-related businesses and increased violent or property crime. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201711
  12. 12. Crime and Cannabis Business (County) • Crime rates in Sonoma County are generally down, vary city by city, and have no discernable connection to cannabis-related businesses. • The Sonoma County Public Safety Consortium' s crime analyst group did not include cannabis-related crime in its top–five priority projects list, which suggests cannabis-related crime has not been significant enough to merit special attention and tracking relative to other crimes. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201712
  13. 13. Crime and Cannabis (Local) • Crime in Santa Rosa, where dispensaries and manufacturing of medical cannabis is permitted, is down in both the violent and property categories. • Cotati currently allows one dispensary. The Cotati Police Department reports a negligible impact on calls for service or crime connected to the city’s dispensary. • Sebastopol currently allows two dispensaries and reports no violent crime directly related to the cannabis industry. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201713
  14. 14. Security and Medical Cannabis Dispensaries A robust security plan is a crime deterrent. It includes, but is not limited to: • Strict documentation and verification of patients, mandated by state law • Multiple camera surveillance system • Exterior lighting system • Professionally monitored robbery alarm system • Secure storage and waste to prevent diversion, theft and loss • Building Code compliant, commercial-grade door and window locks Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201714
  15. 15. Dispensary Recommendations Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 • Allow a storefront medicinal dispensary/recreational retailer, with delivery, within the city limits. • Allow a storefront medicinal dispensary with delivery service within the city limits. 15
  16. 16. Banking Solutions Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 This issue is on the road to resolution: • The Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act of 2017 would allow banks to accept money for cannabis-related businesses. It is currently in US Senate committee.9 • The US Department of the Treasury's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) released written guidance stating that it would not charge a bank with federal crimes for accepting cannabis money if the financial institution made sure that the business was following all state laws.10 16
  17. 17. Banking Solutions Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 • The California State Treasurer is currently leading the Cannabis Banking Working Group to develop recommendations that will open access for cannabis-related businesses to the banking system.11 • San Francisco, Oakland, and Los Angeles are exploring proposals to open a public bank to handle cannabis money without restrictions of federal law.12 • As of September of 2016, the number of banking institutions working with the cannabis industry nationwide was 368 and growing.13 17
  18. 18. Banking Solutions Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 • Several banks and credit unions are accepting cannabis-related deposits in the State of Washington.14 • Some cannabis-based companies convert their cash to money orders to pay taxes and other expenses.15 • Other companies hire armored car services to take cash directly to a Federal Reserve Bank branch for shifting to a friendly bank or credit union.16 18
  19. 19. Law Enforcement • A Pew Research Center survey of nearly 8,000 police officers finds that more than two-thirds of them say that cannabis use should be legal for either personal or medical use.17 • Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), a group of police, judges, prosecutors and other criminal justice professionals that advocated for cannabis legalization endorsed Proposition 64. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201719
  20. 20. Traffic Safety According to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health : • “Medical cannabis laws were associated with immediate reductions in traffic fatalities in those aged 15 to 24 and 25 to 44 years, and with additional yearly gradual reductions in those aged 25 to 44 years.” 18 • “Dispensaries were also associated with traffic fatality reductions in those aged 25 to 44 years.” 19 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201720
  21. 21. Traffic Safety Another study published in the American Journal of Public Health concludes : • “We found no significant association between recreational marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado and subsequent changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates in the first 3 years after recreational marijuana legalization.” 20 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201721
  22. 22. Traffic Safety A recent analysis conducted by the Cato Institute states: • “… [In Colorado] no obvious jump occurs after either legalization in 2012 or the opening of stores in 2014. Likewise, neither marijuana milestone in Washington State appears to have substantially affected the fatal crash or fatality rate.” 21 Another study of data from 19 states published in The Journal of Law and Economics shows: • an 8 to 11 percent decrease in traffic fatalities during the first full year after legalization of medical cannabis. 22 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201722
  23. 23. Traffic Safety ARIDE: Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement • The Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement (ARIDE) program was developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) with input from a number of Chiefs of Police Associations. • The CHP is holding classes to train law enforcement officers to observe, identify, and articulate the signs of impairment related to drugs, alcohol or a combination of both, in order to reduce the number of impaired drivers and impaired driving related traffic collisions. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201723
  24. 24. Traffic Safety • $3,000,000 will go to the Department of Highway Patrol Beginning in FY 2018-19 through FY 2022-23 to establish and adopt protocols to address DUI issues Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201724
  25. 25. Teen Crime Change in crime rate, 2014 (latest year) vs. 2010 (year before marijuana decriminalized for all ages). Source: California Criminal Justice Statistics Center (2015). Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201725 The trends in crime and drug problems in California from 2010 through 2014 in the three years of essentially legal marijuana have been striking. As teenage arrests for marijuana offenses (misdemeanor and felony) fell by 73%, other teenage crime has plunged as never before (down 26% for drugs other than marijuana, down 33% for violent crime, down 38% for all felonies, down 45% for all offenses). Violent deaths and deaths attributed to drug abuse also fell, the latter sharply, among teens. 23
  26. 26. • The results of a recent nationwide study showed no evidence for an increase in adolescent marijuana use after passage of state laws permitting use of marijuana for medical purposes. 24 • Medicinal Cannabis legalization has actually led to a significant decline in teen use rates. A drop of 2% among 8th graders alone was witnessed, and in total, a 1.8% drop among all high schoolers. 25 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 Teen Use 26
  27. 27. Teen Alcohol vs Cannabis Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201727 • According to the California Healthy Kids Survey of 2016, 58% of Sonoma Unified District’s 11th graders have admitted to using alcohol at least once in their lifetime. By contrast, 43% of 11th graders have admitted to using cannabis for the same period. 26 • Data exhibits a discernable decline in the use of cannabis among Sonoma Unified District’s 11th graders from 2011 – 2016. 27
  28. 28. Sonoma Unified 11th Grade Alcohol/Cannabis Use (at least once in their lifetime) © EdgewireMedia 2017 28 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 2009 - 2010 2011 - 2012 2013 - 2014 2015 - 2016 Cannabis Alcohol Data: California Healthy Kids Survey 2015-2016 EdgewireMedia.com
  29. 29. Protects Teens Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group With the passage of SB 94 (MAUCRSA), hardcore advertising and packaging restrictions are now in play 28: • No advertising or marketing cannabis or cannabis products in a manner intended to encourage persons under 21 years of age to consume cannabis or cannabis products • packages and labels shall not be made to be attractive to children • edible cannabis products shall not be designed to be appealing to children or easily confused with commercially sold candy or foods that do not contain cannabis. © EdgewireMedia 201729
  30. 30. Protecting Children • Packaging shall be designed or constructed to be significantly difficult for children under five years of age to open • All product labels and inserts shall include the government warning in large, bold font. • No publishing or disseminating advertising or marketing that is attractive to children. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 30
  31. 31. Protects Children • No free giveaways of cannabis or cannabis accessories as part of a business promotion. • No advertising or marketing on a billboard or similar advertising device located on an Interstate Highway or on a State Highway which crosses the California border • No advertising or marketing cannabis or cannabis products on an advertising sign within 1,000 feet of a day care center, school providing instruction in kindergarten or any grades 1 through 12, playground, or youth center. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 31
  32. 32. Public Health/Emergency Room Visits • Discussions with Emergency Room (ER) nurse supervisors at Sutter, Santa Rosa Memorial, and Petaluma Valley hospitals suggest local hospitals are not experiencing a notable increase in emergency room visits specifically or primarily related to cannabis use. 29 • Methamphetamine and opioid abuse are a far more significant problem with regard to use of ER resources and immediate, threatening risks to ER patients. 30 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201732
  33. 33. Personal Cultivation of Medicinal and Recreational Cannabis Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 The State of California and Sonoma County both allow for personal indoor and outdoor cultivation of not more than 6 plants. 33
  34. 34. Indoor Cultivation Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 Cities must allow indoor cultivation for personal use, up to six plants per residence. 34
  35. 35. Outdoor Cultivation • The voters of the State of California, and the County of Sonoma agree that medical patients can cultivate for their personal use, up to 100 square feet, and that adult users over 21 can cultivate up to 6 plants. • Sun-grown medicine, is the most natural, affordable, medical quality medicine for patients to produce for themselves. • It is not affordable for low-income patients to purchase equipment for indoor cultivation, pay high electric bills, or to build a structure that may require City Permits. We need to keep affordable options available for medical cannabis patients. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 2017 35
  36. 36. Outdoor Cultivation • Compared to indoor grown cannabis, sungrown plants typically require less soil amendments, fertilizers, pesticides and fungicides, making the outdoor method much more environmentally friendly. • The City of Sonoma prides itself in being green, sustainable, and environmentally conscious. By forcing cannabis cultivation indoors, it does not meet these goals, and increases our county’s Carbon footprint. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201736
  37. 37. Outdoor Cultivation • In-home cultivation can pose a bigger threat to public safety because lighting and ventilation systems can pose fire risks and other problems, like flooding, mold or other common by-products of agricultural activity inside a residence. According to Press Democrat search results, there have been at least 7 house fires associated with cannabis grows in the County in the last 4 years, two of which occurred in the greater Sonoma area. • If the city develops reasonable guidelines, a ban would not be necessary and the much larger issues of fire and safety would be resolved. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201737 Firefighters control cannabis related house fire on Alaska Drive, Santa Rosa – John Burgess/ PD
  38. 38. Outdoor Cultivation • Violent crime not an issue, as no large amounts of money are involved in 6 plant personal gardens. • According to Prop 64, any outdoor ban will likely become invalid when the California Attorney General determines that non- medical marijuana has become legal under federal law. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201738
  39. 39. Outdoor Cultivation • Revenues will be generated statewide through taxes on cannabis sales and funds will be distributed “for making grants to local governments to assist with law enforcement, fire protection, or other local programs addressing public health and safety associated with the implementation of the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act.” However, the Board won’t make grants to local governments which have banned the cultivation, including personal cultivation under Section 11362.2(b)(3) of the Health and Safety Code [outdoors upon the grounds of a private residence], or retail sale of marijuana or marijuana products.Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201739
  40. 40. Odor We live in a world of smells that aren’t always appealing to some. Breweries, coffee roasteries, auto exhausts are just a few. We are subjected to the vinegary smell of grapes clipped from their vines and dropped in the vineyards along with hay and the lees from fermentation that are put back into the vineyards as compost. And of course, there is the infamous “Sonoma Aroma”. A couple of times each year, local dairy farmers pump out their holding ponds to spread cow manure on their fields. The odor can range from Petaluma to Sonoma in the east and all the way north to Healdsburg. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201740
  41. 41. Odor • Odor can be mitigated through companion planting of lavender, jasmine, rosemary, basil and many other pleasant smelling flowers and herbs. • Consider that San Luis Obispo has resolved this issue through an ordinance that assumes that any odor (whether cannabis or not) is “offensive to individuals of normal sensitivity” if the city receives three or more complaints within a month from separate households or businesses about a single source of odor. 31 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201741
  42. 42. Water Use, Chemicals & Pesticides • Small personal grows inconsequential • Larger commercial cultivation subject to strict regulations Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201742
  43. 43. Outdoor Cultivation Recommendation • Allow for personal cultivation of 100 square feet, and no more than 6 plants, both outdoors and in greenhouses without a cannabis cultivation permit in accordance with State medical cannabis laws. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201743
  44. 44. State vs. Federal Law • There has been no evidence that other cities have been held liable under federal law for permitting cannabis activates otherwise legal under state law. 32 • Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment blocks the Department of Justice from spending money on medical marijuana prosecutions. A U.S. District Court judge recently cited the amendment as the basis for blocking federal prosecutions of cannabis growers in California. 33 Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201744
  45. 45. State vs. Federal Law • The Cole memo precluded the use of federal resources against states, cities and individuals who are in clear compliance with existing laws providing for the medical use of cannabis. The current administration has assured it will abandon Justice Department efforts to target recreational marijuana in states that have legalized adult use.34 • In City of Palm Springs v. Luna Crest, Inc. (Cal. Ct. App. March 17, 2016) 2016 WL 1056700, the court of appeal concluded the Controlled Substance Act did not preempt a local ordinance that allowed a certain number of dispensaries to operate subject to a local permit. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201745
  46. 46. Tax Revenue • Cities that want a cannabis-related revenue stream should enact a tax in compliance with Propositions 26 and 218 (Sales tax on medical cannabis prohibited). • Advantages: • Locals will have exclusive control over this revenue • Revenue from local tax measures will not sunset, but state grants will • Allowing both means more revenue • Marijuana taxes boost the economy and help school funding Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201746
  47. 47. Tax Revenue The Board of State and Community Corrections will make grants to local governments to assist with law enforcement, fire protection, or other local programs addressing public health and safety associated with the implementation of the Control, Regulate and Tax Adult Use of Marijuana Act. The board shall not make any grants to local governments which have banned the cultivation, including personal cultivation under paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) of Section 11362.2 of the Health and Safety Code, or retail sale of cannabis or cannabis products pursuant to Section 26200 of the Business and Professions Code or as otherwise provided by law. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201747
  48. 48. Loss of Grant Funds Section 34019 (f) C of the Revenue and Taxation Code authorizes state grants to local governments to assist with law enforcement, fire protections, or other public health and safety programs associated with implementing Prop 64. However, local governments stand to lose grant funding under Section 34019 (f) 3(C) if they prohibit retail sales or cultivation, including outdoor personal use cultivation. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201748
  49. 49. Manufacturing Edibles • manufacturing, distribution, labs are tax revenue creators and have little impact on the community Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201749
  50. 50. Reference List Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group 1 “Medical Cannabis Dispensing Collectives and Local Regulations,” Americans For Safe Access, 2011. http://www.safeaccessnow.org/asa_ca_dispensary_report 2 Powell, D., et al. (2015), “Do Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Addictions and Deaths Related to Pain Killers?,” National Bureau of Economic Research. http://www.nber.org/papers/w21345 3 “LAPD Chief: Pot clinics not plagued by crime,” Los Angeles Daily News, January 17, 2010. http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_14206441 4 Ibid. 5 “Marijuana shops not magnets for crime, police say,” Fort Collins Gazette, September 14, 2010. http://www.gazette.com/articles/wall-104598-marijuanabrassfield.html 6 Community Impact Research, Metro State University. “Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado,” presented June 2015. https://www.crcr.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Cannabis-Business-and-Neigborhood-Crime_080616.pdf 7 E. M. Shepard, P. R. Blackley. “Medical Marijuana and Crime: Further Evidence From the Western States,” Journal of Drug Issues. Forthcoming April 2016. https://www.crcr.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Cannabis-Business-and-Neigborhood-Crime_041216.pdf © EdgewireMedia 201750
  51. 51. Reference List, cont. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201751 8 City of Petaluma (Brown) ,”Policy Direction on Local Cannabis Regulation,” Page 3-4, October 2, 2017. http://petaluma.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=31&clip_id=2402&meta_id=381773 9 Wallace, Alicia (2017, Apr 27), “New federal bill would allow banking for marijuana businesses,” The Cannabist. http://www.thecannabist.co/2017/04/27/federal-marijuana-banking-bill-congress-perlmutter/78531/ 10 Black, L. ( 2017, April 19). “The Credit Unions and Small Banks That Solved the Cannabis Cash Crisis,” The Stranger. http://www.thestranger.com/green-guide-spring-2017/2017/04/19/25083313/the-credit-unions-and-small-banks-that-solved-the-cannabis-cash-crisis 11 Ayinehsazian, Sahar (Oct 24,2017). “Could A Public Bank Solve California’s Cannabis Cash Conundrum?” mgRetailer. https://mgretailer.com/could-a-public-bank-solve-californias-cannabis-cash-conundrum/ 12 Koren, James Rufus (July 27,2017). “Should California start its own bank to serve marijuana companies?” Los Angeles Times. http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-public-bank-marijuana-20170727-htmlstory.html 13 Koren, James Rufus (July 7, 2017). “Why some pot businesses hide their cash — and others truck it straight to a federal vault.” Los Angeles Times. http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-cannabis-banking-20170707-story.html
  52. 52. Reference List, cont. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201752 14 Black, L. ( 2017, April 19). “The Credit Unions and Small Banks That Solved the Cannabis Cash Crisis,” The Stranger. http://www.thestranger.com/green-guide-spring-2017/2017/04/19/25083313/the-credit-unions-and-small-banks-that-solved-the-cannabis-cash-crisis 15 Ibid. 16 Koren, James Rufus (July 7, 2017). “Why some pot businesses hide their cash — and others truck it straight to a federal vault.” Los Angeles Times. http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-cannabis-banking-20170707-story.html 17 Ingraham, Christopher (January 11, 2017). “Survey: Two-thirds of cops say marijuana laws should be relaxed,” The Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/01/11/survey-two-thirds-of-cops-say-marijuana-laws-should-be-relaxed/?utm_term=.a06b5ceee9a6 18 Santaella-Tenorio, J, et al. “US Traffic Fatalities, 1985-2014, and Their Relationship to Medical Marijuana Laws,” Am J Public Health. February 2017. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303577?journalCode=ajph 19 Ibid. 20 Aydelotte, Jayson D., etal. “Crash Fatality Rates After Recreational Marijuana Legalization in Washington and Colorado,” Am J Public Health. February 2017. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303848
  53. 53. Reference List, cont. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201753 21 Dills, Angela, et al., “Dose of Reality: The Effect of State Marijuana Legalizations,” Cato Institute, September 16, 2016. https://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/dose-reality-effect-state-marijuana-legalizations 22 Anderson, D. Mark , et al., “Medical Marijuana Laws, Traffic Fatalities, and Alcohol Consumption,” The Journal of Law & Economics, May 2013. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/668812 23 California Criminal Justice Statistics Center (2015), YouthFacts, July 2015. https://www.youthfacts.org/?page_id=75500 24 Hasin, D., et al., “Medical marijuana laws and adolescent marijuana use in the USA from 1991 to 2014: results from annual, repeated cross-sectional surveys,” Lancet , July 2015. http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(15)00217-5/abstract 25 Ibid. 26 California Healthy Kids Survey, “Sonoma Valley Unified Secondary 2015-2016 Main Report”, Page 26, prepared by WestEd, 2016. http://surveydata.wested.org/resources/Sonoma_Valley_Unified_1516_Sec_CHKS.pdf 27 Ibid.
  54. 54. Reference List, cont. Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group © EdgewireMedia 201754 28 “SB-94 Cannabis: medicinal and adult use,” California State Legislature, June 27, 2017. https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB94 29 City of Petaluma (Brown), “Policy Direction on Local Cannabis Regulation,” Page 8, October 2, 2017. http://petaluma.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=31&clip_id=2402&meta_id=381773 30 Ibid. 31 San Luis Obispo Municipal Code, Chapter 8.22, OFFENSIVE ODORS, 2015. http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/SanLuisObispo/html/SanLuisObispo08/SanLuisObispo0822.html 32 City of Petaluma (Brown) ,”Policy Direction on Local Cannabis Regulation,” Page 7, October 2, 2017. http://petaluma.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=31&clip_id=2402&meta_id=381773 33 Ibid. 34 “Trump, Gardner strike deal on legalized marijuana, ending standoff over Justice nominees”, April 13, 2018. https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-gardner-strike-deal-on-legalized-marijuana-ending-standoff-over-justice-nominees/2018/04/13/2ac3b35a-3f3a- 11e8-912d-16c9e9b37800_story.html?utm_term=.53da380d7842
  55. 55. Contact Information Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group Ken Brown Bear Flag Social Club Ken@BearFlagSocialClub.com Cell 707-938-8623 Gil Latimer EdgewireMedia/Sonoma Valley Cannabis Group Gil@EdgewireMedia.com © EdgewireMedia 201755

×