Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Diabetes 2011, Spring Seminar

404 views

Published on

Diabetes, Spring Seminar 2011

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Diabetes 2011, Spring Seminar

  1. 1. <ul><li>Diabetes </li></ul>
  2. 2. What is diabetes? <ul><li>Diabetes is a metabolic abnormality affecting all nutrients, especially the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose), your main source of energy. </li></ul><ul><li>Insulin and glucagon , two hormones produced by your pancreas, regulate the amount of glucose in your bloodstream. When a person has diabetes, this process does not function properly. </li></ul>“ Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004.
  3. 3. Once, there were two types of diabetes; children mainly got one type and adults mostly got the other. Today, we know that younger people can get type 2 and that type 1 often appears in adulthood. During pregnancy, women can get gestational diabetes , which resembles type 2 and usually disappears after childbirth. Diabetes
  4. 4. Gestational <ul><li>During pregnancy, women can get gestational diabetes , which resembles type 2 and usually disappears after childbirth. </li></ul><ul><li>And scientists have identified several other diabetes subtypes beyond types 1 and 2. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Latent autoimmune diabetes <ul><li>The National Institutes of Health (NIDDK) defines LADA as “a condition in which Type 1 diabetes develops in adults.” </li></ul><ul><li>LADA is a genetically-linked, hereditary autoimmune disorder that results in the body mistaking the pancreas as foreign and responding by attacking and destroying the insulin-producing beta islet cells of the pancreas. Simply stated, autoimmune disorders, including LADA, are an &quot;allergy to self.” </li></ul>
  6. 6. LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) <ul><li>The most common of these is called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), and it accounts for roughly 10 percent of people with diabetes, making it probably more widespread than type 1. </li></ul>
  7. 7. U.S. statistics <ul><li>In 2000, 17,702,000 people in the U.S. had diabetes </li></ul><ul><li>In 2030, it is projected that 30,312,000 people in the U.S. will have diabetes </li></ul><ul><li>More than 20% of Americans 65 and older have diabetes </li></ul><ul><li>An estimated 6 million Americans with diabetes do not even know they have it </li></ul>“ Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004. Diabetes: Country and regional data . World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/diabetes/facts/world_figures/en/index3.html Accessed 9/5/2006
  8. 8. Diabetes Trends* Among Adults in the U.S., (Includes Gestational Diabetes) BRFSS, 1990,1995 and 2001 Source: Mokdad, et al. Diabetes Care 2000;23:1278-83; J Am Med Assoc 2001;286:10. 1990 1995 2001 No Data <4% 4%-6% 6%-8% 8%-10% >10%
  9. 9. Does diabetes affect you ? <ul><li>Or does it affect someone you know? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you want to know more about it? </li></ul><ul><li>Can it be prevented - or treated? </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s take a look! </li></ul>
  10. 10. Complications <ul><li>Type I diabetes can affect almost every major organ of your body, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Heart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood vessels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nerves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eyes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kidneys </li></ul></ul>Type I diabetes. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/type-1-diabetes/DS00329/DSECTION=4 Accessed 9/5/2006
  11. 11. Health problems: Cardiovascular <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Heart attacks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2-4 times the risk of dying from heart disease </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strokes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2-4 times the risk of stroke </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High blood pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase risk several fold </li></ul></ul></ul>Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006 “ Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004.
  12. 12. Health problems: Kidneys <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kidney damage (nephropathy) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Signs and symptoms include fatigue, high blood pressure, swollen ankles, feet or hands, shortness of breath, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), and leakage of albumin (a blood protein) into the urine </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kidney failure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>40% of people needing dialysis have kidney failure from diabetes </li></ul></ul></ul>“ Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004. Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006
  13. 13. Health problems: Eyes <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eye Damage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More than 60% of people with Type II diabetes develop deterioration in the blood vessels of the retina </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diabetes increases the risk of developing cataracts and glaucoma </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blindness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diabetes is the most common cause of blindness that starts between ages 20 and 74 </li></ul></ul></ul>“ Medical essay: Diabetes.” Supplement to Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Mayo Clinic. February 2004. Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006
  14. 14. Health problems: Nerves <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Peripheral neuropathy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feet and legs can develop tingling, pain, or a loss of feeling </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Amputations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly 86,000 amputations are performed every year in the U.S. on diabetics, which accounts for 50% of all amputations in the U.S. </li></ul></ul></ul>Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006
  15. 15. Health problems <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sexual-function problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Impotence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Localized nerve failures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Single muscle can lose its function </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Problems that may result: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Eye movement problems with double vision </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Drooping of the cheek or one side of the head (Bell’s palsy) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006
  16. 16. Health problems <ul><li>Type II diabetes can cause: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stomach and bowel problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nausea, constipation, or diarrhea </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dizziness when standing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Poor circulation causing low blood pressure and dizziness when standing </li></ul></ul></ul>Health problems that diabetes can cause. Harvard Medical School’s Consumer Health Information. http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/35072/35073/360341.html?d=dmtContent Accessed 10/3/2006
  17. 17. Controllable risks: LDL <ul><li>Reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the blood </li></ul><ul><ul><li>LDL promotes accumulation of fats in the arteries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diet should not include any animal products of any kind </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid free fats (mayonnaise, oils, margarine, etc.) </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42
  18. 18. Controllable risks: HDL <ul><li>Increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in the blood </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HDL removes fats from blood and tissues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased by: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exercise </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Weight reduction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stopping smoking </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42
  19. 19. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><li>Religious experience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a daily program of Bible study and prayer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn to control thoughts and to dwell on heavenly themes </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 160-163
  20. 20. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><ul><li>Control talking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not too much, not too little </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Talk only about cheerful subjects </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do not talk about yourself </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do not talk about a single subject </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 160-163
  21. 21. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><ul><li>Exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Start with a graduated exercise program </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Take a brisk walk </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hold your head up </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Breathe deeply </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain good posture </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Walk in nature an hour or more each day </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do deep breathing exercises </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 160-163
  22. 22. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><ul><li>Observe strict regularity for meals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Omit all evening food </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guard against overeating or undereating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stress increases after too much food </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eliminate sugar, honey, coconut, dried or very sweet fruits and vegetables during periods when you are feeling stressed </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 160-163
  23. 23. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><ul><li>Avoid nerve stimulating or irritating foods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: hot pepper, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, vinegar, anything made with vinegar (pickles, mayonnaise, catsup, mustard, etc.) </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 157-160
  24. 24. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><li>Avoid foods having a fermenting, putrefying or rotting phase of processing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: sauerkraut, cheese, soy sauce and similar products </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eliminate all concentrated foods such as wheat germ, margarine, dried skim milk and all animal products </li></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 157-160
  25. 25. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><li>Abstain from baking soda and baking powder products, caffeine and other methyl xanthines such as theophylline and theobromine which are found in coffee, tea, colas, chocolate and nicotine </li></ul><ul><li>Eat freely of foods high in B-vitamins such as greens, legumes and whole grains </li></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 157-160
  26. 26. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><li>Take a sunbath daily, weather permitting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Early in the morning (<10:00 a.m.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Late in the afternoon (>3:00 p.m.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take a neutral bath daily </li></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 157-160
  27. 27. Controllable risks: Stress & Hypertension <ul><li>Herbal teas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diuretics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Watermelon seed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Buchu </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Burdock </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dandelion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cornsilk </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hawthorn berry and Dandelion together </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42, 157-160
  28. 28. Diabetes management: Controllable risks <ul><li>Stop the smoking habit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Smoking intensifies all risks in diabetes and must not be a part of the diabetic’s lifestyle </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid being overweight </li></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 42
  29. 29. In almost all cases of Type II diabetes, control of the disease is completely determined by control of appetite, weight and exercise. Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 151
  30. 30. Control of appetite <ul><li>General guidelines: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eat at set times </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do not snack! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chew thoroughly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eat slowly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fasting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Along with other benefits, fasting helps people learn how to manage their appetites and lose weight </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 156, 50
  31. 31. Weight control
  32. 32. Weight control <ul><li>Rule of thumb for average weight: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Give yourself 100 pounds for your first five feet in height. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Women: add 5 pounds per inch thereafter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Men: add 6-7 pounds per inch thereafter (depending on how muscular you are) </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 156
  33. 33. Weight control: Obesity <ul><li>Definition: having a very high amount of body fat in relation to lean body mass, or Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher </li></ul><ul><li>BMI = a measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height </li></ul>Obesity trends among U.S. adults between 1985 an d 2004. CDC http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/trend/maps/obesity_trends_2004.pdf
  34. 34. Weight Control: Body Mass Index <ul><li>Examples </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Height: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Normal (19-24): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overweight (25-29): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Obese (30-39): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extreme obesity (>40): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>72” (6’) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>136-172 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>184-213 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>221-287 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>>294 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>64” (5’4”) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>110-140 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>145-169 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>174-227 lbs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>> 232 lbs </li></ul></ul>National Institutes of Health. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/bmi_tbl.pdf Accessed 8/29/2006
  35. 35. 1996 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991, 1996, 2004 (*BMI  30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 2004 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. 1991
  36. 36. Weight control: Factors that affect weight <ul><li>Positive effect: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regular, moderate exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Green, leafy vegetables and salads </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Negative effect: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The amount and type of dietary fats </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sedentary lifestyle </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 153
  37. 37. Weight control: Factors that affect weight <ul><li>Negative effect: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Irregular meal times </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eating sweets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Loss of sleep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Late and heavy suppers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eating many varieties at one meal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protein of animal origin </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 153
  38. 38. Weight control: Guidelines <ul><li>Cut out all free fats </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes: butter, margarine, mayonnaise, fried foods, cooking fats, salad oils, peanut butter and all other nut or seed butters </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consider becoming a total vegetarian </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Animal products predispose us to many ailments, and are not needed to get essential nutrients </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 153
  39. 39. Weight control: Guidelines <ul><li>Eat nothing after 3:00 p.m. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Metabolism changes about that time, so eating increases your likelihood of gaining weight </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do not eat between meals </li></ul><ul><li>Eat more raw foods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Could include juices or purees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Home-made is best </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 154-6
  40. 40. Weight control: Guidelines <ul><li>Eat a small variety of food at one meal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lower weight gain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beneficial for digestion and health of insulin receptors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exercise immediately after meals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>About 25 minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-strenuous, but brisk </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Walking or bicycling will suffice </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 154-6
  41. 41. Exercise
  42. 42. Exercise: DPP study <ul><li>The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) performed a 3-year, federally funded, study of 3,234 people at high risk for diabetes. </li></ul><ul><li>The goal of the study was to find out if moderate diet changes and exercise will delay and prevent Type II diabetes. </li></ul><ul><li>The answer was yes: diet and exercise sharply reduced the chances that a person with impaired glucose tolerance would develop diabetes </li></ul>Am I at risk for Type II diabetes? Taking steps to lower your risk of getting diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, NIH. Diabetes Prevention Program. NIH NDIC. http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/preventionprogram/index.htm Accessed 10/23/2006
  43. 43. Exercise: DPP study <ul><li>The participants were divided into two groups: the lifestyle change group, and the group that took the diabetes drug metforim. </li></ul><ul><li>Those in the lifestyle change group exercised ~30 minutes a day 5 days a week, usually by walking, and lowered their intake of fat and calories. </li></ul><ul><li>The lifestyle change group reduced their risk of getting diabetes by 58% (71% for those over 60.) The metforim group only reduced their risk by 31% </li></ul>Am I at risk for Type II diabetes? Taking steps to lower your risk of getting diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, NIH.
  44. 44. Exercise: multiple benefits <ul><li>The National Institutes of Health recommend that you should “be physically active every day.” </li></ul><ul><li>Regular exercise benefits in several ways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps you lose weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep your cholesterol and blood pressure under control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps your body use insulin </li></ul></ul>Am I at risk for Type II diabetes? Taking steps to lower your risk of getting diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, NIH.
  45. 45. Exercise: How? <ul><li>If you are not very active, start slowly </li></ul><ul><li>Work up to 30 minutes a day most days of the week </li></ul><ul><li>Choose activities you enjoy </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate it into your daily life </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: take the stairs instead of the elevator; park at the far end of the parking lot and walk; get off the bus a few stops early and walk the rest of the way </li></ul></ul>Am I at risk for Type II diabetes? Taking steps to lower your risk of getting diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, NIH.
  46. 46. Case history 1: 58 year-old female <ul><li>History: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gained ~30 pounds over the past year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sugar level = 350 mg/dl </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Diagnostics before starting program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Weight = 160 lbs, Height = 5’5’’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood pressure = 160/90 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fasting blood sugar = 368 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Serum cholesterol = 348 </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
  47. 47. Case history 1: 58 year-old female <ul><li>Treatment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Predominately vegetarian </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Very low in fats </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High in unrefined carbohydrates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Plenty of raw foods </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weight control </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
  48. 48. Case history 1: 58 year-old female <ul><li>Result </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lost 6 pounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fasting blood sugar was down to 190 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fasting blood sugar dropped to 124 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cholesterol dropped to 220 </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
  49. 49. Case history 1: 58 year-old female <ul><li>Result </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 months </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lost 30 pounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blood sugar was normal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Blood pressure continued to drop slowly </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cholesterol reached 190 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dropped to 118 pounds </li></ul></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 111-2
  50. 50. Case history 2: 68 year-old male <ul><li>History: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Taking 65 units of NPH insulin daily </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On medication for hypertension </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Had a heart attack several years before </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continued to have severe angina </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Had osteoarthritis in many joints </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Had chronic phlebitis in both lower legs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weight: 215 pounds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood sugar: 265; serum cholesterol: 258 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood pressure: 176/100 </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 112-3
  51. 51. Case history 2: 68 year-old male <ul><li>Treatment, part 1: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stopped the insulin immediately </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Went on a two day fast </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Result </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood pressure dropped to 150/90 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blood sugar dropped to 200 </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 112-3
  52. 52. Case history 2: 68 year-old male <ul><li>Treatment, part 2: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mildly heated whirlpool to lower extremities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Massage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mild exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diet: total vegetarian, oil-free, high in unrefined carbohydrates </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Within 3 days, his blood sugar had dropped within the normal range </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 3 weeks, his serum cholesterol came down to 186 </li></ul></ul>Thrash, Agatha and Calvin, M.D. Diabetes & the hypoglycemic syndrome: facts, findings and natural treatments. Seale, AL: NewLifestyle Books, 1993. p. 112-3

×