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Start Making Sense O'Reilly Webcast December 2015

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Slides from O'Reilly webcast I did on 9th December 2015.

The full slides with audio will be on the O'Reilly webcast website soon

Published in: Design
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Start Making Sense O'Reilly Webcast December 2015

  1. 1. Start Making Sense FUNDAMENTALS OF SENSORY DESIGN
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. Introduction Who am I?
  4. 4. Alastair Somerville Sensory Design Consultant Museums, galleries and public spaces Speaking – SxSW, Generate Workshops – UXWeek, ConveyUX, UXLX
  5. 5. O’Reilly Design Conference San Francisco 19th-22nd January 2016 20th – Sense And Sensor Ability workshop
  6. 6. What do I care about?
  7. 7. Making stuff understandable so people can do the things they want to do
  8. 8. What’s the problem?
  9. 9. Tactile design
  10. 10. Look at your hand
  11. 11. Look at your finger
  12. 12. Look at your fingertip
  13. 13. Squeeze your fingertip between your thumb and finger
  14. 14. 3mm Rule
  15. 15. Constraint of designs
  16. 16. Map layout: Pete Stonehouse
  17. 17. Simplify designs
  18. 18. 3D design: Pete Stonehouse
  19. 19. Testing designs
  20. 20. Complexity is not the problem
  21. 21. Confusion is
  22. 22. Understand more about senses and how we make meaning
  23. 23. Organising this webcast FRAMING IDEAS
  24. 24. Organising this webcast 4 parts
  25. 25. Design for the mind
  26. 26. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses
  27. 27. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions
  28. 28. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions Making it personal
  29. 29. Design for the mind COGNITIVE ACCESSIBILITY AND UNDERSTANDING THE STRUCTURE OF MEANING MAKING FOR EVERYONE
  30. 30. Design for the mind is also called Cognitive Accessibility Design for the mind
  31. 31. Exhibition Road Shared Space, London Design for the mind
  32. 32. Design for the mind
  33. 33. Design for the mind
  34. 34. Design for the mind
  35. 35. The shared space is not cognitively accessible Why? Design for the mind
  36. 36. Cognitive Accessibility is Perceivable Intelligible Actionable Design for the mind
  37. 37. Cognitive Accessibility is Perceivable Open to an individual’s sensory capacities Design for the mind
  38. 38. Exhibition Road Shared Space is not Design for the mind
  39. 39. Cognitive Accessibility is Intelligible Open to comprehension by an individual’s intellect Design for the mind
  40. 40. Exhibition Road Shared Space is not Design for the mind
  41. 41. Cognitive Accessibility is Actionable Open to use by an individual Design for the mind
  42. 42. Exhibition Road Shared Space is not Design for the mind
  43. 43. Cognitive Accessibility is Perceivable Intelligible Actionable Design for the mind
  44. 44. Cognitive Accessibility is Perceivable Intelligible All 3 together Actionable Design for the mind
  45. 45. Sensory order and more senses RECOGNISE HOW SENSORY ORDER AFFECTS US AND HOW MANY SENSES WE HAVE
  46. 46. Sensory order and more senses
  47. 47. Sensory order and more senses
  48. 48. Sensory order Sensory order and more senses
  49. 49. Senses Sight Hearing Taste Smell Touch Sensory order and more senses
  50. 50. Senses Sight Hearing Taste Smell Touch Sensory order and more senses
  51. 51. Senses Sight Hearing Taste Smell Touch 4 1 2= 3 Sensory order and more senses
  52. 52. Cognitive Slop Time Sensory order and more senses
  53. 53. Chion Sensory order and more senses
  54. 54. Chion Sensory order and more senses
  55. 55. Chion Audio framing Sensory order and more senses
  56. 56. More senses Sensory order and more senses
  57. 57. More Senses Sight Vision Hearing Audition Taste Gustation Smell Olfaction Touch Somatosensory Balance & acceleration Equilibrioception Temperature Thermoception Kinaesthetic sense Proprioception Pain Nociception Time Chronoception Other internal senses Interoception Sensory order and more senses
  58. 58. More Senses Sight Vision Hearing Audition Taste Gustation Smell Olfaction Touch Somatosensory Balance & acceleration Equilibrioception Temperature Thermoception Kinaesthetic sense Proprioception Pain Nociception Time Chronoception Other internal senses Interoception Sensory order and more senses
  59. 59. Proprioception Sensory order and more senses
  60. 60. Proprioception Chronoception Sensory order and more senses
  61. 61. Don’t add multimodal confusion to Cognitive Slop Time Sensory order and more senses
  62. 62. Emotions and actions A FEEDBACK LOOP ADAPTING TO GROWING COMPLEXITY
  63. 63. Emotions and actions
  64. 64. Simple things can have emotional meanings Emotions and actions
  65. 65. A simple structure of sensing & meaning Sense Take action Emotions and actions
  66. 66. A simple structure of sensing & meaning Sense Make meaning Take action Emotions and actions
  67. 67. A simple structure of sensing & meaning Senses Emotions Make meaning Take action Emotions and actions
  68. 68. A simple structure of sensing & meaning Senses Emotions Make meanings Conscious Decision Take action Emotions and actions
  69. 69. Emotions and consciousness are ways of enabling action Emotions and actions
  70. 70. We adapt Emotions and actions
  71. 71. We imagine Emotions and actions
  72. 72. Emotions and actions
  73. 73. Emotions and actions
  74. 74. Emotions and actions
  75. 75. Imagination is adaption Emotions and actions
  76. 76. Complexity is not the problem Emotions and actions
  77. 77. Confusion is Emotions and actions
  78. 78. Understand how people make meaning iteratively with emotion Emotions and actions
  79. 79. Making it personal FOLLOWING THE SENSORY JOURNEY AND ENABLING HYPERPERSONALISATION
  80. 80. A sensory design framework Making it personal
  81. 81. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Making it personal
  82. 82. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Senses Making it personal
  83. 83. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Sensor Avoider Seeker Bystander Senses Making it personal
  84. 84. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Sensor Avoider Seeker Bystander Senses Emotions Making it personal
  85. 85. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Sensor Avoider Seeker Bystander Arousal Non-arousal Pleasure Displeasure Senses Emotions Making it personal
  86. 86. Sensory & emotional framework Attention Action Sensor Avoider Seeker Bystander Arousal Non-arousal Pleasure Displeasure Senses Emotions Making it personal
  87. 87. 4 ways of enabling understanding Making it personal
  88. 88. Timing Making it personal
  89. 89. Mistimed sensory events cause confusion Making it personal
  90. 90. Timing Volume Making it personal
  91. 91. Overloud/quiet sensory events cause confusion Making it personal
  92. 92. Timing Volume Meaning Making it personal
  93. 93. Metaphors cause confusion Making it personal
  94. 94. Timing Volume Meaning Load Making it personal
  95. 95. Too much information causes confusion Making it personal
  96. 96. Imperial War Museum, London Making it personal
  97. 97. Casson Mann Making it personal
  98. 98. Graphic design: Pete Stonehouse Making it personal
  99. 99. IN OUT Making it personal
  100. 100. IN OUT A map of gaps Making it personal
  101. 101. IN OUT A map of gaps A map to enable personal agency Making it personal
  102. 102. Designing for the future Making it personal
  103. 103. Hyperpersonalisation Making it personal
  104. 104. You can do it now… Making it personal
  105. 105. …but we don’t have time Making it personal
  106. 106. Hyperpersonalisation is… Making it personal
  107. 107. Hyperpersonalisation is… Accessibility Making it personal
  108. 108. Sensory design is recognising the need for accessibility for all of us Making it personal
  109. 109. Use accessibility as framework Listen to users Making it personal
  110. 110. Ending this webcast IDEAS
  111. 111. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions Making it personal
  112. 112. Design for the mind
  113. 113. Perceivable Intelligible Actionable
  114. 114. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions Making it personal
  115. 115. Sensory order and more senses
  116. 116. Don’t add multimodal confusion to Cognitive Slop Time
  117. 117. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions Making it personal
  118. 118. Emotions and actions
  119. 119. Understand how people make meaning iteratively with emotion
  120. 120. Design for the mind Sensory order and more senses Emotions and actions Making it personal
  121. 121. Making it personal
  122. 122. Use accessibility as framework Listen to users
  123. 123. Complexity is not the problem Confusion is
  124. 124. Design with senses Design with emotions Design for individuals
  125. 125. Thank you
  126. 126. Questions?

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