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Brian DesRoches - The Magellan Factor 2018

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Brian DesRoches gave a talk at the WSAPD Annual Meeting about The Magellan Factor. This talk discussed what a 16th century explorer and 21st century neuroscience can teach us about focus, intention and leadership.

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Brian DesRoches - The Magellan Factor 2018

  1. 1. Washington State Academy of Pediatric Dentists Annual Meeting October 6, 2018 The Magellan Factor What a 16th Century Explorer and 21st Century Neuroscience Can Teach Us about Focus, Intention and Leadership
  2. 2. The Magellan Factor What a 16th Century Explorer and 21st Century Neuroscience Can Teach Us about Focus, Intention and Leadership
  3. 3. Flow of this Presentation 1. Brief History of Magellan’s Journey 2. The Magellan Factor 3. Emotional Entanglement 4. A Mind-set for Increasing the Probability of Creating Intended Outcomes 5. Applying this Mind-set to the Challenges of Managing and Leading a Pediatric Dental Practice
  4. 4. What was the real cause of Magellan’s Death?
  5. 5. The Magellan Factor The tendency for individuals to become emotionally entangled in interactions and relationships that distract, hamper or derail them from: • achieving their goals and intended outcomes and/or • following their personal values and principles in communicating and relating with others
  6. 6. 2. Emotional Entanglement Emotional entanglement is the process of taking on or feeling responsible for the emotional state of another person
  7. 7. The Dilemma of Emotional Entanglement Emotional entanglement is based on the principles of: • quantum entanglement • emotional influence As emotional entanglement increases, the capacity to focus on one’s intended outcomes and think clearly is impaired. Individuals use relief-seeking behaviors* to deal with the distress of the emotional entanglement
  8. 8. The strange behavior of elementary particles when they become linked (create a relationship). In this case, when something happens to one, something happens to the other, no matter how far apart they are. They influence each other. • Quantum Entanglement How NIST Detected “spooky actions at a distance” www.nist.gov
  9. 9. An interpersonal psychoneurobiological process in which the internal state/experience of an individual influences the internal state/experience of other individuals and vice- versa • Emotional Influence The Influential Mind – What the Brain Reveals about Our Power to Change Others Tali Sharot
  10. 10. The 5 Universal Relief-seeking Behaviors • Conflict • Withdrawal and avoidance • Overfunctioning • Underfunctioning • Triangulation
  11. 11. • blame • criticize • sarcasm • fault-finding • airing negative feelings • physical violence Conflict
  12. 12. • withdraw • avoid • humor • diversion • spacing out • pretending things are okay • placating • denial Withdraw/avoid
  13. 13. • doing for others what they can reasonably be for themselves • doing giving unsolicited advice or constantly giving solicited advice (to the same person) • taking responsibility for other’s lives • talking more then listening Overfunctioning
  14. 14. Underfunctioning • playing the victim role • constantly seeking reassurance or advice without acting on it • using guilt to get sympathy • constant complaining • unwilling to risk in order to learn
  15. 15. Triangulating At this time in human evolution, triangulating is deeply embedded in the emotional process of human beings Avoiding/reducing negative internal experiences with one person by involving (an)others in the issue being avoided - forming emotional alliances
  16. 16. Emotional Entanglement in a Pediatric Dental Practice
  17. 17. Level 1 - external human behavior - observable, quantifiable, describable, objective Level 2 - internal human experience - invisible, describable to some degree, not quantifiable, subjective, emotional process 2 1 Two Levels of Human Systems
  18. 18. Level 1 Practice Infrastructure, Management Systems, Procedures and Protocols Level 1 Marketing, teamwork, patient communication, etc. Business systems/procedures, scheduling system, etc. Treatment infrastructure and resources, skills and technology, protocols, etc.
  19. 19. Level 2 in a Dental Practice Level 2 Emotional Process
  20. 20. Level 1 Level 2 The “Field” of Emotional Influence at Level 2 Emotional influence creates “fields” of emotional energy
  21. 21. The Complex Human System that is a Dental Practice Level 1 Level 2
  22. 22. Level 2 Emotional Entanglement Emotional entanglement is the outcome of emotional influence
  23. 23. As the degree of emotional influence increases, the potential for emotional entanglement increases
  24. 24. Level 2 Although individuals cannot avoid or bypass the process of emotional influence, they can manage it to reduce the degree to which they are emotionally entangled with others
  25. 25. The Magellan Factor The tendency for individuals to become emotionally entangled in interactions and relationships that distract, hamper or derail them from: • achieving their goals and intended outcomes and/or • following their personal values and principles in communicating and relating with others
  26. 26. Lapu Lapu of Mactan Magellan Rajah Humabon of Cebu
  27. 27. Personal Reflection and Brief Discussion in Triads Think about a recent experience of The Magellan Factor: • Who was involved? • What default behavior did you use? • What did you want to did that you were emotionally inhibited from doing?
  28. 28. Flow of this Presentation 1. Brief History of Magellan’s Journey and Demise 2. The Magellan Factor and Emotional Entanglement -------------------------------------------------------------------- 3. A Mind-set for Increasing the Probability of Creating Intended Outcomes 4. Applying this Mind-set to the Challenges of Managing and Leading a Pediatric Dental Practice
  29. 29. A Mind-set for Increasing the Probability of Creating Intended Outcomes (and Managing Emotional Influence) Intended Outcomes P(IO) = 𝒇{(C + M) x (F + E)}
  30. 30. P(IO) = 𝒇{(C + M) x (F + E)} C = Clarity = degree of clarity, specificity and precision of the IO M = Motivation = strength of the emotional energy associated with the IO F = Focus = degree of attention directed toward the IO E = Effort = expenditure of physical, emotional and mental energy directed toward creating the IO
  31. 31. C = Clarity = degree of clarity, specificity and precision of the intended outcome Intended outcomes are clear, specific and precise using positive words and descriptors.
  32. 32. Some of the challenges of creating intended outcomes: 1. The mental effort required to define IO’s which are clear, specific and precise 2. The tendency to create IO’s for others 3. The tendency to neglect creating IO’s for one’s self 4. The tendency to define an IO as the absence of negatives versus the presence of positives
  33. 33. • based on the absence of a negative outcomes  outcomes defined as what I don’t want • do not align with one’s values and principles • created for someone else (other-referenced)  focused on what you want someone else to feel or do Some characteristics of devitalizing intended outcomes: • based on general thoughts or ideas with no outcome measurability  I want to be “happy”, “successful”, “a good leader”, “ a good communicator”
  34. 34. • stimulate curiosity to acquire and apply knowledge and skills • are experienced internally (subjective) and can be measured externally (objective) Some characteristics of vitalizing intended outcomes: • are created for one’s self (self-referenced) • are based on an external and an internal outcome • induce a creative tension and enhance focus • based on positive outcomes
  35. 35. My intended outcomes for you today: My intended outcomes for myself today:
  36. 36. M = Motivation = strength of the emotional energy associated with an intended outcome Motivation is a “measure” of the emotional energy that is stirred up when we become aware of a difference between what is (current outcome) and what one wants to create (intended outcome)
  37. 37. The challenge of motivation is maintaining it when • one depends on others to achieve the intended outcome and they are not motivated to the same degree • the inevitable resistances and distractions that emerge with the application of effort
  38. 38. F = Focus = degree of attention directed toward the intended outcome The challenge of focus is maintaining it when the inevitable resistances and distractions emerge with the application of effort
  39. 39. The Quantum Zeno Effect The QZE is related to the established observer effect in quantum physics: The behavior and position of any atom-sized entity, such as an atom, an electron, or an ion, appears to stabilize when that entity is observed. (Copenhagen Interpretation) The Mind and the Brain - Neuroplasticity and the Power of Mental Force Richard M. Schwartz, MD
  40. 40. The Quantum Zeno Effect and the Human Brain Applied to neuroscience, the QZE states that the mental act of focusing attention stabilizes the associated brain circuits. Concentrating attention on . . . a thought, an insight, a picture in your mind’s eye, or a feeling/emotion, maintains the brain state arising in association with that experience. Over time, . . . . these circuits can then eventually become not just chemical links but stable, physical changes in the brain’s structure. ?
  41. 41. E = Effort = the expenditure of physical, emotional and mental energy directed toward creating the IO
  42. 42. The challenge of effort: 1. Sustaining the effort by managing its velocity and direction 2. Managing the external resistance and internal distractions generated by emotional influence* 3. Managing external distractions 4. Openness and willingness to change the intended outcome and/or the velocity and direction of the effort based on feedback
  43. 43. Managing the external resistance and internal distractions generated by emotional influence Intended Outcome?
  44. 44. Within your practice, your effort can be optimized with: 1. Documented, efficient systems, procedures and protocols 2. An appropriate and supportive infrastructure – equipment and facilities; marketing; financial management 3. A clear, specific and precise statement of the values that guide and channel the effort of your team* 4. A feedback system to measure progress toward the IO and a process for making changes to the IO or the effort being expended 5. Outcome-oriented positive communication 6. A clear, self-referential intended outcome for interacting and communicating with others*
  45. 45. Example – video of learning to ride a bike
  46. 46. A Spectrum of Human Behavior and Communication Instinctual Learned Intentional
  47. 47. Instinctual physical survival is key able to assess the internal state of others (neuroception)
  48. 48. Learned adaptive patterns of behavior that enable us to fit in and belong based in societal, cultural and familial patterns
  49. 49. Intentional often involves some "discomfort" in the "doing" of new behavior involves significant frontal cortex activation for thinking, planning, creating, choosing, focusing, regulating emotions
  50. 50. Human Behavior and Communication Instinctual Learned Intentional 95 - 99% 1- 5%
  51. 51. 1-5% 95-99% intentional learned and instinctual Human Behavior and Communication
  52. 52. Intentional often involves some "discomfort" in the "doing" of creating new patterns involves prefrontal cortex planning, clarity and focus practice and motivation are the key elements of changing patterns
  53. 53. The Magellan Factor in Action The tendency for individuals to become emotionally entangled in interactions and relationships that distract, hamper and derail them from: 1. achieving their goals and intended outcomes and/or 2. following their personal values and principles in communicating and relating with others
  54. 54. Hi Brian, (first email) This is . . . . I have been speaking with . . . about a situation that I find myself in, and he suggested that I set up a time with you to talk about it. It involves my associate dentist in my office. She is driven by likability, which is nice, and patients like her...however her level of competency is at times very questionable. She believes she is quite competent, and therefore does not greatly strive for learning. I am driven by competency, and based on everything I've learned, we have grown in different ways, and my patients are now clearly getting two different levels of care. It is clear to me what I should do, however I once went through a traumatic experience after firing an employee over competency issues, and therefore I have a mental block about how to handle the situation. That has caused me to look the other way a lot of times versus confronting her about her level of competency in the way that I really want to (a much more direct way). In lieu of that, I have tried influencing her in gentle ways, going one down, etc., but have not been successful because apparently, she doesn't get hints or is not self-aware. I know that her lack of development is partially my fault as well for not guiding her as well as I should have, and letting her practice mostly on her own accord. . . . To be clear, I don't want to let her go...but at some point, I have to do what's best for the practice. So I'd like to try and find a way to keep her, that would be my first choice.
  55. 55. Values A clear, specific and precise statement of the values that guide and channel the effort of your team
  56. 56. Value – from Latin “valere”, meaning to be of worth The attitudes, beliefs and principles that guide the behavior (and the emotional process) of individuals and groups
  57. 57. The Power of Words as Emotional-thought Symbols
  58. 58. Values What are two values that inform how you practice today?
  59. 59. Self-referential IO A clear, self-referential intended outcome for interacting and communicating with others
  60. 60. Template for Creating a Self-referential Intended Outcome Level 1 - External Outcomes Level 2 Internal Outcomes
  61. 61. Level 1 Outcomes Level 2 Outcomes 1. What do I want to communicate about my thinking and observations? 2. What is my responsibility in the situation and relationship? 1. What do I want to remember about myself during the interaction? 2. What emotional state will support me in conveying my message? Creating a Self-referential IO
  62. 62. Level 1 External Outcome 1. To experience myself as caring and non-anxious and remember that it is her choice to decide what she wants and my choice to focus on the importance of competency in my practice 2. To be open to her ideas and concerns about developing her competency and what her priorities are 3. To remember that I am caring person who seeks the best for my patients, my associate and myself 1. To present my thinking about the importance of competency and clarify its meaning to me, and take responsibility for how I have not communicated that clearly 2. To invite the associate’s thinking and discussion about competency and its meaning to her 3. To request clarification about what my associate wants professionally and in the practice Level 2 Internal Outcome
  63. 63. Outcome after Clarifying Values and Applying the Self- referential IO template to the Situation and Relationship
  64. 64. Hi Brian, (second email) I met with my associate today, and I wanted to let you know how it went. I started off by asking permission to talk about goals. I then showed her my mission statement, and then defined what competency means to me, and why that's important for the practice and for our patients. I told her that I didn't do a good job of communicating it previously because if I had, I would be seeing different things from her. (self-referential) She tried to derail, talking about how the staff needs to get better as well, and how she's had to step in and make temporaries for them, etc. I refocused and said that this meeting was going to be about her, not the staff. (managing emotional influence) I asked her what goals she has for herself, what does she want out of her career, this job? (curiosity) She stated that she wants to do bigger cases, better things, but is not sure how to get there. She says she learns by doing it, maybe failing, and then trying it a different way the next time. I told her that if I were clear about my goals for the practice, then she would be asking me more questions, going to study clubs, attending more practical courses, etc. She agreed that she has not done those things, and admitted that she has been using her family as an excuse because she feels intimidated, feeling like everybody else is on a different level, and not wanting to get looked down upon.
  65. 65. Think about a recent experience of The Magellan Factor: • Who was involved? • What default behavior did you use? • What did you want to did that you were emotionally inhibited from doing? 1. What do I want to communicate about my thinking and observations? 2. What is my responsibility in the situation and relationship? Reflection 1. What do I want to remember about myself during the interaction? 2. What emotional state will support me in conveying my message?
  66. 66. The Magellan Factor The tendency for individuals to become emotionally entangled in interactions and relationships that distract, hamper or derail them from: • achieving their goals and intended outcomes and/or • following their personal values and principles in communicating and relating with others
  67. 67. Emotional Entanglement Emotional entanglement is the process of taking on or feeling responsible for the emotional state of another person Emotional entanglement is the outcome of emotional influence
  68. 68. You cannot escape, avoid or ignore the process of emotional influence. You can reduce the degree of emotional entanglement you experience. You can leverage and optimize emotional influence and increase the probability of creating intended outcomes by reducing the degree of emotional entanglement you experience If you want to reduce the degree of emotional entanglement in your life and relationships, consider the following process:
  69. 69. 1. Identify when you default to your relief-seeking behaviors 2. Identify the internal dilemma associated with the situation (example – I want my associate to perform at a higher level of competence but I don’t want to make her feel criticized or judged when I talk with her about this) 3. Use the Template for Creating a Self-referential IO to define the outcomes you seek at Level 1 and Level 2 4. Apply the necessary effort to communicate your concerns and observations while being aware that you may be uncomfortable with doing so
  70. 70. If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or objects Albert Einstein The secret to change is to focus all your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new Socrates We choose our joys and sorrows long before we experience them Kahlil Gibran

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