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Electric Vehicle 101

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An SGCC Guide Connecting the Smart Car to the Smart Grid

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Electric Vehicle 101

  1. 1. Electric Vehicle 101 An SGCC Guide Connecting the Smart Car to the Smart Grid
  2. 2. Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative SGCC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose threefold objective is to listen to consumers via primary consumer research, to collaborate with stakeholders via hosted events and shared best practices, and to educate consumers via outreach and messaging toolkits. Additionally, SGCC serves as a trusted source of information for industry stakeholders seeking a broad understanding of consumers’ views about grid modernization, electricity delivery, and energy usage, and for consumers seeking an understanding of the value and experience of a modern electrical grid.
  3. 3. HISTORY OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES
  4. 4. The First Ever Electric Vehicle Contrary to popular belief, the first-ever electric vehicle made its debut in the 1800s – around the same time that batteries and electric motors were introduced. In 1890, an Iowan chemist named William Morrison, constructed a six passenger car with a maximum speed of 14mph –making it the first successful electric car in the U.S. Although in today’s world, 14 mph is laughably slow, such a speed mirrored the average pace of horse-drawn carriages that were the popular mode of transportation at the time. Shortly after, in 1898, Ferdinand Porsche introduced his version of an electric car called the P1.
  5. 5. Gradual Obsolescence of the EV Following the debut of Henry Ford’s iconic Model T, sales of EVs began to plummet. Consumers preferred the $675 price tag of the Model T, instead of the hefty $1,750 of the standard EV. The discovery of crude oil in Texas, and the sudden prevalence of gas stations across the nation, made gas readily accessible. By 1935, electric cars had become obsolete.
  6. 6. THE RESURGENCE OF EVS
  7. 7. EVENTS THAT HELPED TO REVIVE THE EV INDUSTRY Passing of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976 Passing of the 190 Clean Air Act Amendment and the 1992 Energy Policy Act The release of the Toyota Prius – the first- ever mass produced hybrid EV – in 2000. The 2006 startup of Tesla Motors out of Silicon Valley.
  8. 8. TO BUY OR NOT TO BUY?
  9. 9. PROS CONS 4.) Lower maintenance (no oil changes, no emissions checks, and no tune-ups) 1.) No tailpipe emissions 2.) Reduced dependency on oil 3.) Extremely convenient (you can simply charge your battery at home instead of having to constantly fill up at the gas station) 1.) Limited Range (EV automakers are continuously increasing the range of their newer models) 2.) Long Refueling Time (owners are advised to charge their vehicles during the night)
  10. 10. POPULAR MODELS
  11. 11. 2016 CHEVY VOLT Hybrid SedanEstimated Range Total of 420 Guaranteed 50 miles of electric range before gas engine kicks in Accelerates from 0 to 60 in 7.8 seconds! Ability to increase electric mile range by manually increasing regenerative braking
  12. 12. 2016 NISSAN LEAF ALL ELECTRIC HATCHBACK SEDAN Accelerates from 0 to 60 in 10.2 seconds! Takes as little as four hours to fully charge! Two battery-pack options 24-kWh: offers 87 electric miles on a single charge 30-kWh: offers 107 electric miles on a single charge Energy efficient LED lights significantly reduces wind noise and drag by redirecting airflow
  13. 13. 2016 TESLA MODEL S ALL ELECTRIC SEDANAccelerates from 0 to 60 in 5.5 seconds! Advanced versions are equipped with an autopilot feature that allows for the car to park itself in the garage Powertrains: Base level S70: 234 electric mile range; 89 MPGe 70D: 240 electric mile range; 101 MPGe Powertrains: 90D: 294 electric mile range; 103 MPGe P90D: 270 electric mile range; 95 MPGe
  14. 14. EV SMART GRID INTERACTION
  15. 15. EVs are the perfect storage unit because… They Have Ample Amount of Energy Storage They can store as much as three days’ worth of the average home’s daily consumption They Have Easy Access for Control Signals Direct communication with the grid allows for them to be able to readily store and discharge energy when needed They are Geographically Dispersed Instead of being in a permanent location like wind turbines or solar panels EVs can change location at any given timeThey act as an emergency power source They ease congestion during peak demand hours
  16. 16. CHARGING YOUR ELECTRIC VEHICLE
  17. 17. HOME CHARGING PUBLIC CHARGING • Pay-as-you-go • Depending on the charging station, the cost per kWh may vary. • Monthly Subscriptions • Free • The most convenient and practical option that illustrates the cost efficiency of EVs. Through the use of Electric Vehicle Service Equipment (EVSE), EV owners are able to conveniently charge their vehicles throughout the night during off-peak hours. • EVSEs allow for EV owners to connect (charge) their vehicles to a 240-volt electric outlet. • It is important to install the EVSE in a convenient location that is easily accessible. • It is recommended that the EVSE outlet be portable instead of permanently mounted to a wall.
  18. 18. U.S. DOE’S EV CHARGING STATION LOCATION MAP
  19. 19. EV UTILITY RATE PLANS
  20. 20. FIVE STEPS TO GETTING THE BEST UTILITY RATES 1. Consult your local utility company to get advice on which rate plan is the best fit (They will advise that the EV be charged during times that are the most efficient for the grid). 2. To ensure the lowest rate possible, consider getting a time-of-use (TOU) plan and charge during off-peak hours (throughout the night). 3. Double check to make sure that the EV is not charging during peak demand hours. Utility companies increase the rates considerably during the day when they know the demand will be at its highest. 4. TOU plans are generally always the best plan for EV drivers/owners. 5. Think twice about installing a separate meter unit that monitors charging. Estimates show that an EV will add about 350 kWh of energy usage to one’s account in a typical month – potentially doubling or even tripling your rate. The cost for charging an EV depends on when it’s charged, where it’s charged, and the rate plan the owner has chosen.
  21. 21. FUTURE OF EV INDUSTRY
  22. 22. There are currently more than 23 plug-in electric and 36 hybrid vehicle options in the U.S. There are currently more than 234,000 plug in EVs and 3.3 million hybrids on U.S. roads today. We could potentially reduce our dependence on foreign oil by 30%- 60%. We could lower the carbon pollution from the transportation sector by more than 20%.
  23. 23. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SMART GRID, VISIT THESE SGCC RESOURCES: Consumer Benefits of the Smart Grid http://www.whatissmartgrid.org/smart-grid-101/consumer-benefits Smart Grid FAQs http://smartgridcc.org/research/smart-grid-faq/ Smart Grid Glossary http://www.whatissmartgrid.org/smart-grid-101/smart-grid-glossary

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