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Activate Students While Exploring ELA & ELD in Tandem

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This presentation considers new curriculum and practices that activate students' desires to read like a detective and write like an investigative reporter. New research tells us that curriculums must prioritize content knowledge development, and be guided by complex text.
English Language Development lessons must work in tandem with English Language Arts when students are learning in a language other than their own. The learning environment where English Language Arts and English Language Development are vertically aligned, backwards-mapped and information is released gradually are fundamental for students future.
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Activate Students While Exploring ELA & ELD in Tandem

  1. 1. Do students want to be Normal or Amazing ? Activate a Student’s Desire to Learn!
  2. 2. TURN TALK
  3. 3. ELA and ELD WORKING in TANDEM
  4. 4. Whole Group Small Group TRANSFER YOU ELDELA
  5. 5. RIGOR VIGOR
  6. 6. Instructional Panning & Support
  7. 7. Close Reading is important because it is the building block for larger analysis. Thoughts evolve not from someone else's truth about the reading, but from individual observations as part of a carefully constructed curriculum.
  8. 8. The core idea is that annotation should help the reader during and after reading.
  9. 9. By anthropologist and naturalist Loren Eiseley Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. Immediately there was a response. The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be thoroughly entrapped.
  10. 10. How Can I Locate the Main Idea? Once you can find the topic, you are ready to find the main idea. The main idea is the point of the paragraph. It is the most important thought about the topic. To figure out the main idea, ask yourself this question: What is being said about the person, thing, or idea (the topic)?
  11. 11. By anthropologist and naturalist Loren Eiseley Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. Immediately there was a response. The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be thoroughly entrapped.
  12. 12. Productive Struggle to experience difficulty and make a very great effort in order to do something long-lasting.
  13. 13. Instead of another safety net, teach them how to JUMP!
  14. 14. Whole Group Model/Access Grade-Level Complexity Small Group Differentiated Practice/Application
  15. 15. BITE S INCREME NTS MINI- LESSONS BITE S BITE S
  16. 16. E L D C U L T U R E
  17. 17. Amplify! not Simplify
  18. 18. Agency!
  19. 19. Student agency refers to learning through activities that are meaningful and relevant to learners, driven by their interests, and often self-initiated with appropriate guidance from teachers.
  20. 20. Self- Direction or Control? “Control might lead to compliance but it doesn't inspire us to do our best” Bob Sullo
  21. 21. Led by the Teacher, Owned by the Students! Apply Share Model Guide Transfer
  22. 22. Teaching for Transfer Transfer is “the practice of applying knowledge or meaning from a familiar context to an unfamiliar context.”
  23. 23. Close Reading is important because it is the building block for larger analysis. Thoughts evolve not from someone else's truth about the reading, but from individual observations as part of a carefully constructed curriculum.
  24. 24. DESTINATION = GOALS ELA ELD
  25. 25. By anthropologist and naturalist Loren Eiseley Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. Immediately there was a response. The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be thoroughly entrapped.
  26. 26. STUDENT The idea here is that I’m writing these things in the margins — these purposeful annotations — not simply for a grade or because the teacher said, “Do a close reading.” I’m doing it to help me dominate: A_the task of understanding and learning from the text while reading (this is one of my ultimate goals for my students — that they’ll read the texts I assign with self-kindled, habituated, cultivated curiosity, engaging with it for learning’s sake) B_the task of doing a thing with that text after reading (if my head is on straight as a teacher, there’s going to be a piece of writing or a piece of speaking that every student will do with any given text).
  27. 27. Reciprocal Reading and Writing “…students are expected to read carefully to make meaning and identify evidence.” “Teaching students to annotate text (mark text and make notes) for specific elements…”
  28. 28. Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. Immediately there was a response. The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be thoroughly entrapped.
  29. 29. curious strand web plucked menacing occupant vibrate blur brushed claw wing snare thoroughly entrapped
  30. 30. curious strand web plucked menacing occupant vibrate blur brushed claw wing snare thoroughly entrapped
  31. 31. strand web menacing occupant vibrate thoroughly entrapped
  32. 32. menacing occupant thoroughly entrapped
  33. 33. By anthropologist and naturalist Loren Eiseley 1 Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. 2 Immediately there was a response. 3 The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. 4 Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be
  34. 34. Picture Walks A picture walk allows readers to explore and interpret visual images across all content areas. Connect visual images to their personal experiences and activate prior knowledge while expressing themselves at their own oral language level. Details Count!
  35. 35. If you see it? You’ll talk about it! If you talk about it? You’ll be able write about it!
  36. 36. A Culture of Thinking!
  37. 37. READ LIKE A DETECTIVE, WRITE LIKE AN INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER
  38. 38. READ LIKE A DETECTIVE, WRITE LIKE AN INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER
  39. 39. Productiv e Struggle
  40. 40. Productiv e Struggle
  41. 41. Productiv e Struggle
  42. 42. Backwards Mapping To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you're going so that you better understand where you are now so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.
  43. 43. Essential Question Well-crafted questions ground intellectual pursuits giving students some sense of direction, purpose, and relevance as they are engaged in the work of the subject. Good questions direct students to dig deeper into content and processes, and delve deeper into a subject or the content.
  44. 44. Transforming Parents, Administrators, Teachers and Students!

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