Bike Share Program Investigation Best Practices, GTHA Context Analysis and Legal Review
Outline <ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 1: Best Practices Investigation </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 2: GTHA Context An...
Context PARIS NEWMARKET TORONTO
Phase 1: Best Practices Investigation <ul><li>Evolution of bike share programs </li></ul><ul><li>Types of bike share progr...
Evolution of Bike Share Programs <ul><li>1 st  generation </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd  generation </li></ul>
Evolution of Bike Share (cont.) <ul><li>3 rd  generation </li></ul>
Benefits of Bike Share Programs
Potential Risks of Bike Share <ul><li>Safety of cyclists </li></ul><ul><li>Vandalism and theft </li></ul><ul><li>Financial...
Types of Bike Share Programs <ul><li>“ SmartBike” third generation bike share </li></ul><ul><li>“ Call-a-Bike” third gener...
Operational Models <ul><li>1. “Public” Bike Share </li></ul><ul><li>2. “Private” Bike Share </li></ul>
Case Studies Examined <ul><li>V é lib (Paris, France) </li></ul><ul><li>SmartBike DC (Washington, DC) </li></ul><ul><li>Ac...
Case Study: V élib <ul><li>Launched July 2007 with 12,250 bikes at 450 stations </li></ul><ul><li>A year later 1,450 stati...
Case Study: SmartBike DC <ul><li>North American “Smart Bike” program </li></ul><ul><li>August 2008 launch, 60 bikes, 7 sta...
Case Study: Acc ès Vélo   <ul><li>Employer bike share program </li></ul><ul><li>Montr é al TMAs </li></ul><ul><li>TMAs pur...
Phase 2: GTHA Context Analysis <ul><li>Environmental scan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community profiles and travel patterns </l...
Environmental Scan <ul><li>Nine candidate urban growth centres (UGCs) </li></ul>
Environmental Scan (cont.)
Cycling Policies, Programs and Infrastructure and Partners
Integration Strategies <ul><li>Transit, carpool lots, pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>Land use: mobility hubs and UGCs </li>...
Legal Review and Risk Management <ul><li>Five bike share models reviewed </li></ul><ul><li>Main risks outlined and risk ma...
Implementation Strategies <ul><li>Fee for use “public system” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large urban centres – 200,000 + </li><...
Implementation Strategies (cont.) <ul><li>Community-based public or private system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attract potential...
Key Factors for Successful Implementation <ul><li>Thorough planning to minimize operating costs and maximize revenues </li...
Plans for Bike Share Programs  in Canada
Next Steps <ul><li>Consultation with municipalities and key stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 3: Newmarket pilot feasib...
What are your thoughts  about the potential for bike sharing in your communities?
Thank You <ul><li>Questions or comments? </li></ul><ul><li>Catherine Habel, Metrolinx </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Bike Share Program Investigation: Best Practices, GTHA Context Analysis and Legal Review

2,218 views

Published on

Presented by: Catherine Habel, BSC, MES
Presented at: ACT Canada TDM Summit, Toronto, November 2009

Published in: Automotive
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,218
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
65
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • - Thank you - very happy to be here this morning on the last day of a very interesting and productive conference to present about Innovation in TDM and Active Transportation - the projects that we are presenting on this morning are pushing the boundaries of traditional TDM strategies. I’m very happy to be synthesizing work that has been underway for many months and to share the results of our study with you I’m also very interested in hearing your thoughts because bike sharing certainly is an innovation that has sparked the interest of many of us
  • Why conduct this study? Bike share programs growing in popularity in North America and Canada We wanted to know what all the buzz was about and at the same time conduct our due diligence in terms of understanding various aspects of bike sharing and more specifically understanding them in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area context Metrolinx, is the Greater Toronto Transportation Authority charged with coordinating transportation Last year, Metrolinx released The Big Move: Regional Transportation Plan that was developed within a highly consultative framework In the plan, Big Move #4: Complete walking and cycling networks with bike-sharing programs Strategy #4: Create an ambitious transportation demand management program This particular study was undertaken in response to local initiatives and proposals for bike sharing including the Newmarket Bike Library proposal and also the Toronto Public Bicycle Project, which the City of Toronto is leading The study was initiated in partnership with Smart Commute Central York, who wanted to conduct a feasibility study for a bike library. Metrolinx facilitated the procurement process for the TMA and at the same time, we took the opportunity to conduct the background research that we needed SUM UP: what does the experience of Paris and other places that have bike share programs tell us about the potential for bikesharing in our communities, in downtown Toronto, in Newmarket or Mississauga or Hamilton for that matter? MMM Group with TCAT, Dale and Lessman and Stationnement de Montreal retained through an RFP process – thanks to them, I’m happy to be presenting on behalf of the team today, many of them are in the room… I’d also like to acknowledge the City of Toronto staff who are here…who we consulted with through all phases of the study. The input we got from all of our partners has certainly been invaluable.
  • Outline of Phase 1, the Best Practices investigation
  • Bikesharing is both an old and new concept. Bike share programs their roots in the 1960s with what are called “first generation” bike share programs like Amsterdam’s white bicycle program, launched in 1964. The bike share concept evolved from there to what can be considered second generation, e.g. BikeShare “Yellow Bike” program (Toronto), e.g. University of Toronto bike share program, which is more structure in terms of the tracking of bike and memberships
  • But in recent years have really seen a dramatic change due to technological advances first piloted in 1998 – V é lo à la carte (Rennes, FR) and eventually taken up by other areas like V é lib (Paris) and Bixi (Montreal), where they have caught the attention of many.
  • - More successful programs have shown that bike share programs can: - Promote cycling by increasing access to bicycles, raising the profile of cycling and acceptance of cycling as a normal travel behaviour - Give cities the ability to “brand” cycling which might be more effective than other marketing initiatives - Can be implemented relatively quickly and at little cost compared to other transportation systems SUM UP: These bikes are a visible part of the urban fabric and their critical mass mean that they not only provide a new mobility option but they can become part of a city’s identity
  • At the same time, bike share programs don’t come without their share of risk
  • One main advantage of the study is that it allows us to frame the discussion about bike sharing in our region by defining the concepts we use to describe it to make sure that we are all on the same page.
  • 1. “Public” Bike Share Smart Bike or Call-a-Bike (is a fee for use system that is run usually by a public-private partnership or with public funding) It is very much an extension of public transit 2. “Private” Bike Share describes community-based bike shares, who serve members, often with voluteers and are usually free or or cost very little to use. Employer bike shares are included in this category.
  • I will go over three of them, which illustrate the different models that were identified
  • Launched July 2007 with 12,250 bikes at 450 stations Full implementation a year later 1,450 stations and 20,600 bikes and 100,000 annual memberships City with JC Decaux $1,650 per bike and $28,000 per station Operating costs and revenues from advertising are unknown Cycling increased by 70% within three weeks
  • North American “Smart Bike” program August 2008 launch, 60 bikes, 7 stations Operated by Clear Channel through bus shelter advertising contract with DOT Same system as Barcelona $40 annual membership and free use 150 daily users SUM UP: A much smaller scale system than in Paris, but nonetheless, an attempt at testing bike sharing in the North American market
  • Employer bike share program Coordinated by Montr é al TMAs, we looked specifically at the downtown TMA, Voyagez Fute’s, program TMA purchases fleet, designs the program, and promotes the program to employees Owned and operated by the employer, promoted by TMA In 2008, the downtown TMA, Voyagez Fute’s employer program had 2,100 rentals at 13 employers Usage is mostly for personal purposes (82%) SUM UP: Bernadette, Claude and other Montreal CGDs could speak in more detail about this
  • Overview of phase 2 of the study, which looked more specifically at the GTHA and explored the potential for bike sharing in different local markets. Again, as the regional transportation authority, we have a mandate to consider various communities, including downtown Toronto, which is an obvious potential market, but also other areas and what are the opportunities and challenges in them.
  • Province’s growth plan identifies a number of Urban Growth Centres. Of the list of likely candidates, we chose nine to examine in detail. This isn’t to predetermine potential markets, but rather to hone in on a couple of places that we could use as guinea pigs to develop an evaluation framework, which could later be applied to any area.
  • The nine potential markets we examined are identified here. This is a map from the Big Move, which began to explore potential for cycling and active transportation in the GTHA by looking at the density of short trips (less than 5 kilometres)
  • In the evaluation framework, we included a number of indicators including: - Bicycle master plan status - Community bicycle facilities - Bicycle promotion and safety programs - Transit service - Cycling and transit integration - Cycling attitudes - Partners: governments, TMAs, transit agencies and these may be different depending on the community and the type of system being contemplated. Take Newmarket for example, the regional municipality, chamber of commerce and their Library System formed a Bike Library Task Force to develop a proposal for a bike library
  • We also looked at - Integration strategies with transit and other modes, land use and TDM programs - As well as potential funding sources like grants and sponsorships, membership/user fees and advertising
  • Another key piece to the study was a legal review that provides us with a number of strategies for mitigating inherent risks associated with bike share programs
  • Conclusions…implementation strategies
  • Newmarket Bike Library (2010) City of Toronto Public Bike Project (2010) National Capital Commission (Ottawa-Gatineau) (2010, trial 2009) TransLink (Vancouver) (2009-2010) Implemented: Bixi (Montreal) (June 2009) and I’m happy to hear about others It will be interesting to see how these initiatives progress – it seems like there is so much going on right now
  • Bike Share Program Investigation: Best Practices, GTHA Context Analysis and Legal Review

    1. 1. Bike Share Program Investigation Best Practices, GTHA Context Analysis and Legal Review
    2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 1: Best Practices Investigation </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 2: GTHA Context Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Next Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>
    3. 3. Context PARIS NEWMARKET TORONTO
    4. 4. Phase 1: Best Practices Investigation <ul><li>Evolution of bike share programs </li></ul><ul><li>Types of bike share programs </li></ul><ul><li>Operational models </li></ul><ul><li>Six case studies </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits and Risks </li></ul><ul><li>Best practices </li></ul>
    5. 5. Evolution of Bike Share Programs <ul><li>1 st generation </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd generation </li></ul>
    6. 6. Evolution of Bike Share (cont.) <ul><li>3 rd generation </li></ul>
    7. 7. Benefits of Bike Share Programs
    8. 8. Potential Risks of Bike Share <ul><li>Safety of cyclists </li></ul><ul><li>Vandalism and theft </li></ul><ul><li>Financial and reputational risks of implementing an unsuccessful program </li></ul>
    9. 9. Types of Bike Share Programs <ul><li>“ SmartBike” third generation bike share </li></ul><ul><li>“ Call-a-Bike” third generation bike share </li></ul><ul><li>Community bike share/lending libraries </li></ul><ul><li>University campus bike share </li></ul><ul><li>Employer bicycle fleets/bike share </li></ul>
    10. 10. Operational Models <ul><li>1. “Public” Bike Share </li></ul><ul><li>2. “Private” Bike Share </li></ul>
    11. 11. Case Studies Examined <ul><li>V é lib (Paris, France) </li></ul><ul><li>SmartBike DC (Washington, DC) </li></ul><ul><li>Acc ès Vélo (Montréal, QC) </li></ul><ul><li>U of T Bikechain (Toronto, ON) </li></ul><ul><li>Buffalo Blue Bicycle Program (Buffalo, NY) </li></ul><ul><li>Blue Urban Bike Program (Carrboro, NC) </li></ul>
    12. 12. Case Study: V élib <ul><li>Launched July 2007 with 12,250 bikes at 450 stations </li></ul><ul><li>A year later 1,450 stations and 20,600 bikes and 100,000 annual memberships </li></ul><ul><li>City with JC Decaux </li></ul><ul><li>$1,650 per bike and $28,000 per station </li></ul><ul><li>Cycling increased by 70% within three weeks </li></ul>
    13. 13. Case Study: SmartBike DC <ul><li>North American “Smart Bike” program </li></ul><ul><li>August 2008 launch, 60 bikes, 7 stations </li></ul><ul><li>Clear Channel through bus shelter advertising contract with DOT </li></ul><ul><li>$40 annual membership </li></ul><ul><li>and free use </li></ul><ul><li>150 daily users </li></ul>
    14. 14. Case Study: Acc ès Vélo <ul><li>Employer bike share program </li></ul><ul><li>Montr é al TMAs </li></ul><ul><li>TMAs purchase fleet, designs the program, and promotes the program to employees </li></ul><ul><li>Owned and operated by the employer, promoted by TMA </li></ul><ul><li>2,100 rentals at 13 employers </li></ul><ul><li>Usage is mostly for personal purposes (82%) </li></ul>
    15. 15. Phase 2: GTHA Context Analysis <ul><li>Environmental scan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community profiles and travel patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plans for bike share programs in Canada </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders and potential partners </li></ul><ul><li>Integration strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Potential funding sources </li></ul><ul><li>Recommended implementation strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Key factors for successful implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying pilot markets </li></ul><ul><li>Critical path for implementation and future research </li></ul>
    16. 16. Environmental Scan <ul><li>Nine candidate urban growth centres (UGCs) </li></ul>
    17. 17. Environmental Scan (cont.)
    18. 18. Cycling Policies, Programs and Infrastructure and Partners
    19. 19. Integration Strategies <ul><li>Transit, carpool lots, pedestrians </li></ul><ul><li>Land use: mobility hubs and UGCs </li></ul><ul><li>Workplace and school-based TDM programs </li></ul>
    20. 20. Legal Review and Risk Management <ul><li>Five bike share models reviewed </li></ul><ul><li>Main risks outlined and risk management strategies provided </li></ul>
    21. 21. Implementation Strategies <ul><li>Fee for use “public system” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large urban centres – 200,000 + </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Centred on higher-order transit stations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on short trips </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phased roll out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage cycling as daily form of travel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential for GTHA-wide coordination (e.g. branding, technology, etc.) </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Implementation Strategies (cont.) <ul><li>Community-based public or private system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attract potential cyclists and introduce them to benefits of cycling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Convert limited number of trips to bike trips </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less tangible benefits of jump-starting a cycling culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide option for integration with transit, carpooling and walking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Centred around a major institution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Longer lending periods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Free to use or nominal membership charge </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Key Factors for Successful Implementation <ul><li>Thorough planning to minimize operating costs and maximize revenues </li></ul><ul><li>Strong domestic target market </li></ul><ul><li>Some tourist volumes </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate logistics and technology </li></ul><ul><li>Sustained funding </li></ul><ul><li>Risk management strategies </li></ul>
    24. 24. Plans for Bike Share Programs in Canada
    25. 25. Next Steps <ul><li>Consultation with municipalities and key stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 3: Newmarket pilot feasibility study (underway) </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 4: Newmarket pilot implementation plan (underway) </li></ul><ul><li>City of Toronto Bike Share Project </li></ul><ul><li>Employer-based bike share programs </li></ul>
    26. 26. What are your thoughts about the potential for bike sharing in your communities?
    27. 27. Thank You <ul><li>Questions or comments? </li></ul><ul><li>Catherine Habel, Metrolinx </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>(416) 874-5934 </li></ul>

    ×