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Public
Information
Session
Coyotes
skedaddlewildlife.com
Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control
Who Are We?
o Canada’s largest provider of humane removal and
exclusion of raccoons, squ...
o Partnerships with Municipalities,
SPCA/Humane Societies, wildlife agencies
Conflict with Urban Wildlife
“With 80 percent of the population
living in urban or suburban areas,
the average person is n...
o Wary of humans and avoid people whenever
possible.
o Adapted well to living near humans and
development.
o Nocturnal, ro...
o No fear of humans or exhibiting aggressive
behaviours = habituated to people through
feeding. (direct or indirect)
o Pop...
Why Are They Here?
o Created habitat for coyotes by expanding urban
areas.
o Large rodent populations- poisons not sold
ef...
o Plenty of green spaces
Why Co-Exist?
o Adapted to urban lifestyles because city environments
support them.
o Feed primarily on the millions of mi...
Why Co-Exist?
o Trapping/poisoning does not discriminate between coyotes,
children, pets and other wildlife - exposing all...
Trapping Consequences
o Spreading of disease to non-target animals
o MNR policies restricting relocation and/or euthanasia...
Solutions
o Aggressive road kill clean up program.
o Public Education
o fact sheet
o website
o public Information sessions...
Coyote Sightings
• Do not run – triggers a hunt or play instinct.
• Raise your arms above your head and act
aggressively.
...
Never Feed Coyotes
• Bad for the health and safety of both the
coyote and community.
• Lose their natural fear of people a...
Eliminate Food Sources
• Coyotes are scavengers.
• Eliminate food sources.
• Garbage – keep a secure lid on all your
garba...
Eliminate Food Sources
• Compost or leaves – keep compost covered
and reduce food odours by adding newspaper.
Eliminate Food Sources
• Pet food – do not feed pets or store food
outside.
Eliminate Food Sources
• Fruit Tree – coyotes don’t mind a tasty fruity
snack. Pick your tree fruit before it falls.
Eliminate Food Sources
• Rodents – clean up anything (including bird
feeder seed) that can attract rodents to your
yard.
•...
Pet Safety
Cats
• Keep indoors.
• Remove attractants from your yard – neighbourhood will
reduce the probability of a coyot...
Pet Safety
Small Dogs
• Keep your dog on a short leave while outside.
• Avoid extension leashes.
• Supervisor your dog whe...
Pet Safety
Large Dogs
• Coyotes pose very little risk to medium to large sized
dogs.
• Discourage your dog from feeling co...
Solutions
o Habitat modification – prevent potential dens in high risk
areas:
o brush piles in recently cleared fields
o r...
Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control provides:
o Public Education campaigns
o Pigeon Control
o Road kill removal
o Trap progr...
Summary
o Coyotes found in every city across North America
o Stanley Park in Vancouver, NYC Central Park, Los Angeles, Chi...
o Top predator, prey on a pest that most people
hate: rodents.
o Compete with other animals, like raccoons,
for food.
o He...
• Call 9-1-1 in case of emergency
Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control
297 Brucedale Ave.E
Hamilton, ON
905-574-7777
Summary
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Hamilton, Ontario Coyote Presentation

Information on coyotes in Hamilton, ON presented by Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control.

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Hamilton, Ontario Coyote Presentation

  1. 1. Public Information Session Coyotes skedaddlewildlife.com
  2. 2. Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control Who Are We? o Canada’s largest provider of humane removal and exclusion of raccoons, squirrels, skunks, birds, bats, mice and other wildlife. o Founded in 1989 in Hamilton, ON o Service over 75 municipalities throughout Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. o Expanding throughout North America via franchising
  3. 3. o Partnerships with Municipalities, SPCA/Humane Societies, wildlife agencies
  4. 4. Conflict with Urban Wildlife “With 80 percent of the population living in urban or suburban areas, the average person is now more likely to encounter wildlife in their backyard or local park than on a hunting or sightseeing excursion” - The Humane Society of the United States
  5. 5. o Wary of humans and avoid people whenever possible. o Adapted well to living near humans and development. o Nocturnal, roaming at night looking for food. o Daylight hours bedded in bushy or wooded areas. o Unusual for coyotes to show no fear of humans. Coyote Facts From:
  6. 6. o No fear of humans or exhibiting aggressive behaviours = habituated to people through feeding. (direct or indirect) o Populations fluctuate based on abundance or scarcity of food. o Low food = higher mortality rate and lower reproduction rates. o Coyote deaths through humans- hunting, trapping, motor-vehicle accidents.
  7. 7. Why Are They Here? o Created habitat for coyotes by expanding urban areas. o Large rodent populations- poisons not sold effective January 1, 2014. o Accessible garbage
  8. 8. o Plenty of green spaces
  9. 9. Why Co-Exist? o Adapted to urban lifestyles because city environments support them. o Feed primarily on the millions of mice and rats in Hamilton o One part of our diverse ecosystem. o Eradication programs in North American cities are expensive failures. o Radication may remove (kill) coyotes habitat remains. o Trapping and poisoning programs are not practical.
  10. 10. Why Co-Exist? o Trapping/poisoning does not discriminate between coyotes, children, pets and other wildlife - exposing all of them to the same risk. o Coexistence is not an option if an individual coyote has threatened a person. o Aggressive coyote should be removed from the area. o The environment and human behaviour that led to the coyote’s actions remain. If people continue to feed coyotes and allow them to feel comfortable around their homes, people and pets, problem coyotes will occur again and again
  11. 11. Trapping Consequences o Spreading of disease to non-target animals o MNR policies restricting relocation and/or euthanasia o High potential for tampering/vandalism/liability o Removing individuals from a population will cause rebound
  12. 12. Solutions o Aggressive road kill clean up program. o Public Education o fact sheet o website o public Information sessions o road kill reporting o Pigeon Control. o Rodent control – rodenticides not being sold to the public.
  13. 13. Coyote Sightings • Do not run – triggers a hunt or play instinct. • Raise your arms above your head and act aggressively. • Yell – the sound will scare it and alert others that a coyote is near. • Wave sticks or throw objects. • If the coyote does not run away or acts aggressively towards you: – retain eye contact and stay facing the coyote – pick-up small pets and young children – move toward an area of increased activity
  14. 14. Never Feed Coyotes • Bad for the health and safety of both the coyote and community. • Lose their natural fear of people and will become aggressive.
  15. 15. Eliminate Food Sources • Coyotes are scavengers. • Eliminate food sources. • Garbage – keep a secure lid on all your garbage and don’t litter
  16. 16. Eliminate Food Sources • Compost or leaves – keep compost covered and reduce food odours by adding newspaper.
  17. 17. Eliminate Food Sources • Pet food – do not feed pets or store food outside.
  18. 18. Eliminate Food Sources • Fruit Tree – coyotes don’t mind a tasty fruity snack. Pick your tree fruit before it falls.
  19. 19. Eliminate Food Sources • Rodents – clean up anything (including bird feeder seed) that can attract rodents to your yard. • Rodents make up 75% of a coyote diet.
  20. 20. Pet Safety Cats • Keep indoors. • Remove attractants from your yard – neighbourhood will reduce the probability of a coyote visiting your home. • Build outdoor cat runs. • Outdoor cats face potential death from cars, diseases, parasites, raccoons and dogs in addition to coyotes. • Keep cats indoors, especially at night.
  21. 21. Pet Safety Small Dogs • Keep your dog on a short leave while outside. • Avoid extension leashes. • Supervisor your dog when it’s off leash in the yard. • Walk your dog at times and places that coincide with high pedestrian traffic. • Keep your dog in front of you. If your dog stops, keep an eye on it. • Dog walk with a friend or relative. • Pick your dog up if you see a coyote.
  22. 22. Pet Safety Large Dogs • Coyotes pose very little risk to medium to large sized dogs. • Discourage your dog from feeling comfortable with coyotes by preventing it from “playing” with them. • Leash and supervisor your dog closely. • Never let your dog interact with coyotes.
  23. 23. Solutions o Habitat modification – prevent potential dens in high risk areas: o brush piles in recently cleared fields o railway corridors o Abandoned buildings – good maintenance o Enforce cat-at-large by-law.
  24. 24. Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control provides: o Public Education campaigns o Pigeon Control o Road kill removal o Trap program sick/injured animals o Response to citizen complaints o Search and identify food source and den site locations o Assist with habitat modification o Rodent control programs
  25. 25. Summary o Coyotes found in every city across North America o Stanley Park in Vancouver, NYC Central Park, Los Angeles, Chicago and Boston o Growing presence of these top predators might not be such a bad thing.
  26. 26. o Top predator, prey on a pest that most people hate: rodents. o Compete with other animals, like raccoons, for food. o Help dampen an overpopulation of raccoons.
  27. 27. • Call 9-1-1 in case of emergency Skedaddle Humane Wildlife Control 297 Brucedale Ave.E Hamilton, ON 905-574-7777 Summary

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