Lexical approach

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Lexical approach

  1. 1. Lexical Approach
  2. 2. Lexical chunk Lexical chunk is an umbrella term which includes all the other terms. We define a lexical chunk as any pair or group of words which is commonly found together, or in close proximity.
  3. 3. Collocation Collocation is also included in the term lexical chunk, but we refer to it separately from time to time, so we define it as a pair of lexical content words commonly found together. Following this definition, basic + principles is a collocation, but look + at is not because it combines a lexical content word and a grammar function word. Identifying chunks and collocations is often a question of intuition, unless you have access to a corpus.
  4. 4. Lexical Chunks (that are not collocations) by the way up to now upside down If I were you a long way off out of my mind
  5. 5. Lexical Chunks (that are collocations) totally convinced strong accent terrible accident sense of humour sounds exciting brings good luck
  6. 6. A theory of learning According to Lewis (1997, 2000) native speakers carry a pool of hundreds of thousands, and possibly millions, of lexical chunks in their heads ready to draw upon in order to produce fluent, accurate and meaningful language. How then are the learners going to learn the lexical items they need?
  7. 7. Criticism : One of the criticisms levelled at the Lexical Approach is its lack of a detailed learning theory. It is worth noting, however, that Lewis (1993) argues the Lexical Approach is not a break with the Communicative Approach, but a development of it.
  8. 8. According to Lewis: Language is not learnt by learning individual sounds and structures and then combining them, but by an increasing ability to break down wholes into parts. Grammar is acquired by a process of observation, hypothesis and experiment. We can use whole phrases without understanding their constituent parts. Acquisition is accelerated by contact with a sympathetic interlocutor with a higher level of competence in the target language.

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